Political MoJo

Sisters Are Doin' It To Themselves

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 7:22 PM EST

It began when a DePauw University psychology professor distributed a survey, and students described one sorority as "Daddy's little princesses" and another, Delta Zeta, as "socially awkward." Speaking for myself, I would rather eat rocks than be part of a group of Daddy's little princesses, but apparently, not everyone feels that way. The Delta Zeta membership at DePauw had declined, so some important DZs from the national office in Ohio went to Indiana to help. They interviewed 35 members of the DePauw DZ chapter, and concluded that 23 of them were "insufficiently committed" to the sorority. Those women were asked to leave the sorority house.

Every one of the 23 women just happened to not pass the American standard of weight normalcy, i.e., they were considered overweight. The group also included the only Korean woman, the only black woman, and the only Vietnamese woman in the sorority.

And then there were twelve--all slender, all popular with frat men--and six of those were so angry about what had occurred that they quit Delta Zeta. Other students staged protests, parents wrote angry letters, and a faculty petition declared the house-cleansing "unethical."

The executive director of Delta Zeta denies that the 23 women were evicted from the sorority house. Here is the text of the letter those women received:

"The membership review team has recommended you for alumna status. Chapter members receiving alumnae status should plan to relocate from the chapter house no later than Jan. 29, 2007."

There really isn't much room for interpretation there. Nice having you, your time is up, get out. Delta Zeta at DePauw has a bit of a mixed record when it comes to diversity, but overall, seems to have done very well, and now is "paying for it" by having members who are not the average girl from your video. In September of 2006, the women were told that national representatives were coming to interview them about their "commitment," and that they should "look their best." Four women with especially good instincts withdrew from the chapter right away, bringing the total victim count to 33.

Debbie Raziano, national president of Delta Zeta, in a letter written yesterday, denies the occurence described in the "unfortunate New York Times article." "The article," she said, "is inaccurate and grossly mischaracterizes the situation." She said that the chapter was supposed to close at the end of the 2006-2007 school year because of declining membership, and reorganize later, but the reorganization request was denied by the university. The university asked the sorority to do a membership review, and only those women who were willing to do day-to-day recruiting were chosen to continue to be active members.

Raziano's version of events is even more outrageous than what a reading of the Times article would lead one to conclude: that the women who were not model-thin just weren't up to doing the recruiting, and all the slim white women enthusiastically jumped on the recruiting bandwagon. What a coincidence.

Jill, writing for Feministe, says:

It's easy to demonize the Delta Zeta leadership for their (obviously abhorrent) actions here. But even they were only reacting to a greater social consensus among other members of campus--that a "worthy" sorority is one which is made up of traditionally attractive women who will be attractive to fraternity men. This kind of stuff is par for the course when it comes to sorority and fraternity selection processes. And while it helps to call out the bad behavior of one sorority, that hardly solves the larger problem. Until women are valued for more than their physical appearance, and until attractiveness and social status are less dependent on perceived economic status, we won't be getting anywhere.

I have a suggestion for the 23 banished DZ members: Start a chapter of Sigma Rho. When I was in college, a number of women were kicked out of their sororities for the most absurd reasons (including passing pizza out of a dormitory window). They formed their own sorority, Sigma Rho (Sorority Rejects), threw their own parties and dances, and held their own fundraisers. Their sister group, Delta Mu (Discontented Members)--which would already have 10 members at DePauw--did the same thing, and enjoyed many joint activities with Sigma Rho. Being invited to a Sigma Rho/Delta Mu event was a hell of a lot more hip than being invited to a regular sorority bash, and also a hell of a lot more fun.

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Troop Readiness Comprised, Bush Cuts Corners Again

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 7:02 PM EST

USA Today reports that two brigades, headed to Baghdad as part of Bush's escalation to reinforce the security of the city, will forgo essential desert training in California. Instead the troops will finish their readiness training at their home bases. This should come as no surprise to anyone who has been watching the administration cut corners militarily for the past four years. But somehow the consistency of this trend makes it no less appalling. As Think Progress points out, Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, is screaming about this over at her blog, The Gavel:

"This unacceptable state of readiness affected our military long before President Bush ordered an escalation of the Iraq war in January, but the escalation is making it worse."

For more on how the Iraq war is "Breaking the Army" and how our troops are paying dearly for it, see Mother Jones' new report on Iraq.

Scientists Say Enough to Right-Wing Manipulation of Their Work

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 5:29 PM EST

The religious right defends its intolerance towards gays and lesbians by generating misleading statistics about them. For example, groups like Focus on the Family and the Family Research Council claim that gay men are more likely to be pedophiles than straight men simply by calling men who abuse boys "gay," rather than pedophiles. A greater proportion of child molesters choose victims of the same sex than consenting adults choose partners of the same sex, so there you have it: Gay men molest boys. (Confused? You should be.)

They also claim again and again that children do best with a mother and a father. That's not what the research says. Research says that kids do better with two parents than one, but parents' gender and orientation have no effect. (Slate's William Saletan exhaustively debunked the right's response to Mary Cheney's pregnancy if you want more details.) Just as their bogus studies (with such qualified authors as born again actor Kirk Cameron) make a mockery of science, so does their success getting their views reported by media outlets trying to be balanced make a mockery of that basic journalistic tenet.

Well, at long last, the scientists whose professional studies are being cherry-picked and distorted to bolster the religious right's claims have created a website to refute the misuse of their work. The site, RespectMyResearch.org, lists the studies that have been distorted and explains how. It also has a portal researchers can use to report misuse of their findings.

If only mainstream media outlets will check it before they publish bogus claims fed to them by right-wing think tanks, maybe some intelligent public dialogue about GLBT issues will follow.

Is It Getting Mean to Keep Making Fun of Cheney?

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 4:29 PM EST

Matthew Yglesias at The American Prospect has a funny analysis of the Cheney-Pelosi dust-up last week. (Recap: In an ABC interview Cheney said, "If we were to do what Speaker Pelosi and Congressman Murtha are suggesting, all we'll do is validate the al-Qaeda strategy." Pelosi accused him of questioning her patriotism and asked Bush to distance himself from the Veep's remarks. Cheney claimed he had questioned her judgment, not her patriotism.)

Here's Yglesias—the last bit is pretty smart:

The only element of Pelosi's judgment I would question at all was her initial response to Cheney's first attack…All Pelosi needed to do in response was note that if Dick Cheney thinks she and Murtha are badly wrong, they must be on the right track…She should have just smeared Cheney's remarks all over the White House and driven home the point that, in opposing Democratic efforts to change the course in Iraq, Bush is once again taking Cheney's advice -- a strategic approach that works exactly never.

If you're one of those for whom Cheney-bashing never gets old, check out the entire piece, entitled "Cheney Follies: Our vice president is both a national joke and a national nightmare."

Hillary Responds to Ethics Allegations: Whoopsie!

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 3:32 PM EST

hillary.jpg

Sen. Hillary Clinton has for five years running neglected to report her involvement with a Clinton family charity in her ethics disclosures. After Sen. Bill Frist and Rep. Nancy Pelosi attracted attention (though no penalties) for the same oversight, it seems bizarre at best that Hillary's professional army of advisers would have neglected to report the senator's role in the foundation. (The family foundation is separate from the better known William J. Clinton Foundation.)

More importantly, such pet charities generate temptations for additional ethics violations: An individual connected to a certain corporation can make a contribution to a particular charity as a way of currying favor with a politician. Notorious examples include the Ted Stevens Foundation, a charity whose mission is to "honor and recognize the career of Sen. Stevens." A 2004 foundation dinner was attended by executives whose corporations had business before the Senate Appropriations Committee, which Stevens led. Ethics violator extraordinaire Tom DeLay also established a charity whose major donors turned out to be major corporate players.

Finally, there's a personal ethics issue. Here's the Post:

The retired chief of the IRS branch that oversees tax-exempt nonprofits said family-run foundations are commonly created by wealthy Americans, allowing them to earn tax breaks by donating to a charity whose future good works they can control. Such charities need only to give 5 percent of proceeds each year to maintain a tax exemption.

The Post's numbers indicate that the Clintons have given away about 10 percent of what they have put into their private charity. In a sense, holding Hillary accountable for this is unfair since the tax code routinely hands out favors like this to the wealthy, but she is running for president—and as a Democrat—so maybe we can fairly ask a little more from her?

Romney Battle Plan Leaks to the Press

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 1:33 PM EST

Whoa boy. Somehow the Boston Globe got a hold of a 77-slide PowerPoint presentation created by the Romney campaign that analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of Romney, McCain, and Giuliani. Frankly, the thing is hilarious (the campaign is worried that Romney's helmet-like hair is "too perfect") but I won't be able to do any better chopping the thing up than Kos blogger BarbinMD already did. So enjoy.

Oh, and by the way, if this all sounds familiar, it's because the same thing happened to Giuliani just a little while back. Remember when the Democrats were the ones who ran sloppy campaigns and lacked party discipline?

Advertise on MotherJones.com

John Gibson of FOX Doesn't Consider Himself a "News Guy"

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 11:15 AM EST

 john_gibson130.jpg John Gibson is the big-haired FOX host that, amongst few other distinctions, pimps the "War on Christmas" meme more than the rest. Now he's finally got something to really hang his hat on: he's the one FOX guy who will stand up to CNN's "news guy snobbery." Covering the "real" news is for nerds -- elitist nerds! Like soulful, squinty, supernerd Anderson Cooper.

To explain. On his radio show the other day, Gibson defended FOX's non-stop coverage of Anna Nicole Smith's death. He said that the story supplies all the drama people love in TV and movies, except the facts are all real. He accused CNN's Cooper of exemplifying the "news guy snobbery" that leads news outlets to shrink from stories like the Smith saga and to instead bore their viewers with Iraq coverage (presumably stuff like global warming, the minimum wage, and the impending war with Iran would also fall in this category; I think it's safe to say John Gibson wouldn't approve of MoJoBlog).

At one point in the show Gibson mocks Cooper, saying, "Oh, 'There's a war on! There's a war on!' Maybe, just maybe, people are a little weary, Mr. Cooper, of your war coverage, and they'd like a little something else." But he doesn't limit his criticism to Anderson Cooper. Also guilty? Basically any self-respecting journalist. Gibson rails against the "high-minded view of a lot of news professionals, people who think, you know, their news program is just another part of Foreign Affairs Quarterly." He again evoked the s-word. "Those people are snobs." Edward Murrow, Dan Rather, David Brinkley, Walter Cronkite -- please exit history, stage left. John Gibson has dismissed you.

[Audio of all the blathering here.]

Well, Mr. Gibson, I propose a deal. If you agree to never consider me a sexmonger because I don't cover the Anna Nicole Smith story, I'll agree to never consider you a journalist. I think that's fair. I'm with ThinkProgress, who points out:

Since Smith's death on Feb. 8, 42 U.S. soldiers have died fighting in Iraq. Approximately 969 Iraqis have been killed. Americans aren't weary of the media's war coverage, they're weary of the war itself.

Iraqi Oil Agreement Reveals the True Winners in Iraq

| Tue Feb. 27, 2007 10:48 AM EST

The Iraqi oil deal, which now goes before the country's parliament, spells the end of the country as a nation state, and signals a great Bush victory in the war.

The Byzantine, nearly incomprehensible scheme for dividing up oil revenues on the basis of population is little more than a sick joke, a façade for the biggest rip off of resources since the British first barged into Mesopotamia over a century ago. The distribution of the money by population in reality provides a means why which the U.S. can pay for the arms and troops it hopes will control those populations.

This law sanctions contracts between regions and foreign oil companies. It effectively puts an end to a nationalized petroleum industry that provides most of the revenue to sustain the country. Oil revenue divvied up among three regions effectively ends Iraq's viability as a nation. Over time, the oil revenues might sustain some sort of Kurdistan, along with a Shia state, and a Sunni state, albeit a small one. The Sunnis don't have much oil — as of now.

While the deal, on its face, splits up control of Iraq's oil among Kurds, Shia and Sunnis, the real power of course is in the hands of the international companies that will strike contracts with one or another of the different entities, put up most or all of the money for exploration, development of infrastructure, and actual production through "device of production" agreements. These agreements, infrequently used in the business, mean that oil revenue will first go to the companies to recoup their expenses and exploration costs. They will be considerable since the industrial infrastructure will have to be rebuilt in many areas and because much of the country has not been mapped. Arguments among the parties will be settled in courts outside the country.

Iraq currently has the second or third largest known reserves in the world. It may well turn out to have the biggest reserves when the nation is completely mapped. These reserves will become more important over time because Saudi Arabia's vast pool of untapped oil is widely believed to be beginning a decline and anyway has been overstated by the Saudis. This deal presents a serious challenge to whatever control OPEC still has over prices and production.

Much of the Iraqi oil goes down through the Persian Gulf. During the war between Iraq and Iran, the U.S. was engaged in supporting Saddam with naval protection for Iraqi tankers, ready to reflag them if necessary, so they might appear to be our own. Now we don't have to reflag them. Our companies will own them.

As for Iran, our interests in the Persian Gulf, that is, the West's interests — the big oil companies are American and British — become ever more important. There is no question that, if challenged, we will fight Iran for that oil. After all, it will increasingly become the key source of supply for us and probably much of Europe.

People who say the U.S. lost the war are wrong. Bush and the oil companies won.

-- James Ridgeway

Bob Kuttner Has Tasted the Obama Kool-Aid, and it is Sweet

| Mon Feb. 26, 2007 1:13 PM EST

Kuttner is co-editor of the American Prospect, and we know who he's supporting in 2008.

I have followed politics far too long to fall in love, but I have to say that Barack Obama is like nothing we have seen since Bobby Kennedy and maybe since FDR. If you haven't read his first book, Dreams From My Father, you owe it to yourself.
Obama wrote the book when he was 33, having spent nearly three years as an organizer on Chicago's South Side, and then three years at Harvard Law School where he was elected president of the Law Review. From there he went to Kenya, to come to terms with the African side of his family.
Reading this work, you think: no 33-year-old has the right to such uncommon wisdom and humanity. The comparisons that come to mind are the young Martin Luther King, or Vaclav Havel, or maybe Jefferson.

I think a lot of hard-boiled politicos are softies at heart, just waiting to be inspired. The Obamania 2008 National Tour continues!

Debating the End of the Vilsack Era

| Mon Feb. 26, 2007 12:33 PM EST

There's a mini-debate going on over at the American Prospect blog TAPPED about the reasons Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack dropped out of the running for the Democratic nomination.

Ben Adler chimed in first with the conventional wisdom: Vilsack simply couldn't find any loose dollars hanging around Democratic circles, because high-powered candidates with fully-formed fundraising machines have already taken them all. This is really two explanations in one. First, the campaigns are starting earlier and earlier with only independently wealthy and/or celebrity candidates able to generate enough early buzz to stay in the race. Second, Vilsack didn't have the qualities needed to compete in a Democratic race in which the bar is set very, very, very high.

The blogosphere's best Klein responded with characteristic astuteness:

...the roster of candidates who've already dropped out is instructive. Mark Warner and Evan Bayh, two deeply credible, DLC-type moderates, exited early into the race, and not for lack of funds. Rather, they realized this wasn't a year that could support moderate technocrats. Democratic voters are looking for progressive vision and assertiveness, not small promises and managerial acumen. Vilsack, I'd bet, realized the same thing.

My only contribution here is this. It's not that this year is bad for governors; politics are changing in fundamental ways that make the future bad for governors. Matt Yglesias wrote an article for the Prospect online (that was kind of the inspiration for the debate) in which he decried the inability of Bill Richardson, New Mexico Gov. and second-tier presidential candidate, to get any traction. In the end Matt reasoned that today's political atmosphere only takes "famous" candidates seriously; if you aren't a celebrity, you aren't a contender. This is undoubtably true, and what no one has said yet is that this likely means the end of governor-presidents.

Everyone (including Richardson) says that Richardson's strongest characteristic is that he's a governor, and Americans love electing governors to the presidency. Not any more. If you're governor of California, New York, or Virginia, you can get famous. Otherwise, it'll be real tough. And if you can't get famous, you can't run. And besides, in an era of near constant campaigning, only senators have enough breaks in their work schedule to travel the country; governors have to actually, you know, run things.

The only thing that could resurrect governors' chances nationwide is if the primary schedule is completely redrawn -- which it likely will be -- and states that were previously off the map become extremely important. California, for example, is moving it's primary up to February 5, making the nation's biggest state much more relevant and the man or woman who runs it a much bigger figure.