Andy Kroll

Andy Kroll

Senior Reporter

Andy Kroll is Mother Jones' Dark Money reporter. He is based in the DC bureau. His work has also appeared at the Wall Street Journal, the Guardian, Men's Journal, the American Prospect, and TomDispatch.com, where he's an associate editor. Email him at akroll (at) motherjones (dot) com. He tweets at @AndyKroll.

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Greenspan: Dummy-proof Wall St. Reform

| Wed Apr. 7, 2010 9:56 AM EDT

Alan Greenspan, the dour former chairman of the Federal Reserve, joined the growing ranks of financial experts saying we can't rely on "fallible" human regulators to rein in Wall Street under the re-drawn lines of new financial regulation. (That is, if we get new financial regulations.) Greenspan's remarks came as part of his testimony today before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, a Congressionally-mandated panel investigating the root causes of the financial crisis.

A former regulator himself, Greenspan told the FCIC, led by former California state treasurer Phil Angelides, that new financial safeguards should require higher capital cushions to absorb losses and force banks to have more skin in the game on their trades. "Concretely, I argue that the primary imperatives going forward have to be on increased risk-based capital and liquidity requirements and significant increases in collateral requirements irrespective of the financial institutions making the trades," Greenspan said. "Sufficient capital eliminates the need to know in advance which financial products or innovations will succeed in assisting in effectively directing a nation's savings to productive physical investments and which will fail. He added, "In a sense, [capital requirements] solve every problem." Asked about what kind of capital requirements are needed, Greenspan didn't offer any specific figures but said only they needed to be "adequate."

Greenspan's views on financial regulation come, in part, as the former Fed chairman defends his record, despite widespread criticisms that he missed the housing bubble's genesis and failed to crack down on subprime lending. In his written testimony, Greenspan countered by saying he warned of the "housing boom" as early as 2002, and that the Fed took significant steps to crack down on a subprime market that, in the 2000s, spiraled out of control. However, Greenspan stressed, as he has before, that he himself, as well as any regulator, can never fully predict the next crisis, and that cold, hard capital restrictions are the key to preventing the next meltdown. 

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Reid, Struggling, Jabs Sarah Palin

| Tue Apr. 6, 2010 10:05 AM EDT

A week after Sarah Palin stood in his hometown and called for his ouster, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) let one fly at the former Miss Wasilla in a recent campaign speech. "I was going to give a few remarks on the people who were over here a week ago Saturday," said Reid in a clip posted by Fox News, "but I couldn't find it written all over my hands." (A reference, of course, to Palin's choice to write interview notes on her hand.) The veteran Nevada senator, appearing at what looks like an old-timey diner of sorts with cushy leather booths and kitschy Western wall art, also dropped a "You betcha" into his remarks by way of poking fun at Palin, the 2008 vice presidential candidate for the GOP.

Reid, to be fair, owed it to himself to fire back at Palin and the Tea Partiers who'd descended on dusty Searchlight, Nev., last weekend for, among other things, a Harry Reid Bash Fest 2010. As our own Tim Murphy, on the scene in Searchlight, wrote, "Nearly every single one of Harry Reid's potential GOP challengers were given five minutes to make they case for why they disliked Searchlight's native son the most." Hitting back at Palin was the least Reid could do. (To watch the video clip, click here.)

In all seriousness, though, Reid had better be ready to remove the kid gloves on the campaign trail. A Rasmussen poll released Monday shows that Reid trails by 15 percentage points in a potential Senate match-up with Sue Lowden, the former chair of the Nevada GOP. In the poll, Lowden claimed 54 percent of support (a 3 percent increase from early March), while Reid had a mere 39 percent (a 1 percent increase).

Of course, the midterm elections are eight months away; an entire race can be won, lost, then won again between now and November. But the last thing Harry Reid wants is to find himself in a hole against Lowden when Congress shifts from policymaking to full-blown campaigning mode later this summer.

Mission Impossible: Financial Bill Deadline

| Mon Apr. 5, 2010 11:44 AM EDT

Democrats locking horns on financial reform are in a pickle. As Politico reports today, some Dems with a hand in crafting the Senate's Wall Street overhaul have begun to doubt whether a Memorial Day deadline is at all realistic for delivering a bill to President Obama. And they're probably right: That would mean a majority in the Senate agreed to a politically palatable bill, passed it, then both the House and Senate reconciled their two pieces of legislation and sent the combined bill to the president. In a little under two months. When it took the Senate banking committee, led by Sen. Chris Dodd (D-CT), far longer just to get out of committee.

The fear among Democrats, the Politico story highlights, is that a May 31 deadline, which the administration put in place, will imbue financial reform talks with the same partisan flame-throwing that so marred the health care debate. Ditching the deadline, worried Dems say, could allow for improved negotiations and a better shot at a bipartisan financial reform bill. It might also blunt the public blowback seen with the health care bill's passage. A number of outsiders—lobbyists, former government officials—quoted in the Politico story say the deadline was more a rhetorical flourish than anything, an effort by Obama and Co. to keep Congress' talks moving at a rapid clip.

Not only that, but there's the fear that any major legislation considered after Memorial Day will be overtaken by campaigning for the looming fall elections. That's certainly true for vulnerable Dems—those who voted for health care, for instance—who'll be spending much of the second half of 2010 clawing to keep their seat and, inevitably, less concerned about systemic risk and capital restrictions and consumer protection agencies. It's sad, but a reality—especially in what's shaping up to be a tough midterm election for Democrats, among them those fighting for financial reform.

Of course, no one who's closely followed financial reform believes the Memorial Day deadline means anything. After all, Dodd said early last year that he expected a financial bill to be completed by year's end. Well, it's April 2010, and the full Senate hasn't even begun talks. What remains to be seen, and what really matters, is whether the Democratic leadership will be able to juggle writing new financial reforms and helping party members campaign to keep their seats. It's a balancing act that could land them what they want on both accounts.

Fred Karger's Fight for Gay Rights

| Mon Apr. 5, 2010 9:20 AM EDT

On Friday, Salt Lake City and its mayor, Ralph Becker, joined the growing list of cities nationwide to ramp up protections and rights for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender citizens, as the city's ban on discrimination in the workplace and in housing for the GLBT community took effect. Voicing support for Salt Lake City's new laws, in addition to gay-rights groups, was an unlikely organization: the Mormon Church. Indeed, the Mormon Church had pledged to support Salt Lake City's anti-discrimination laws as early as last fall, when a church spokesman said, "The church supports these ordinances because they are fair and reasonable and do not do violence to the institution of marriage."

The Church's support of gay rights is anything but typical. As MoJo's Stephanie Mencimer describes in her latest piece, "Game Changer," the Mormon Church has consistently, secretly battled gay marriage for several decades. And though Salt Lake City's laws have nothing to do with marriage, the Mormon Church as a gay rights ally is nonetheless startling.

Leading the effort to push back against the Mormon Church's gay marriage opposition, Mencimer writes, is a man named Fred Karger, a wily, creative, unrelenting thorn in the Mormon Church's side. A former TV actor and top GOP operative (remember Willie Horton? That was Fred), Karger is now taking his bag of political tricks into the gay marriage battle nationwide—and, in many ways, winning. The story of his transformation and battle against the Mormon Church is one you don't want to miss.

Doctor: Obama Voters Piss Off

| Fri Apr. 2, 2010 12:29 PM EDT

A Florida doctor has fired the latest shot across the bow in the battle over implementing President Obama's health care bill. The Orlando Sentinel reports that Dr. Jack Cassell, a urologist with an office near Orlando, made his disgust perfectly clear over "Obamacare," as its opponents deride it, by taping a sign to his front door that read:

"If you voted for Obama...seek urologic care elsewhere. Changes to your health care begin right now."

Cassell said that he wasn't necessarily rejecting care for patients, but merely voicing his opinion on Obama's health care overhaul. "I'm not turning anybody away—that would be unethical," Cassell, a Republican, told the Sentinel. "But if they read the sign and turn the other way, so be it."

Medical ethics experts interviewed by the Sentinel said that while Cassell wasn't blatantly discriminating against patients—political leanings aren't legally protected when it comes to discrimination law—the doctor was "trying to hold onto the nub of his ethical obligation," said the expert, William Allen, a University of Florida professor of bioethics. Cassell also papered his waiting room with GOP-produced fliers on the health care bill, the Sentinel reported, and featured a sign near those documents that said, "This is what the morons in Washington have done to your health care. Take one, read it, and vote out anyone who voted for it."

Cassell's office, it turns out, is located in the district of Rep. Alan Grayson (D-FL), the tenacious, outspoken lawmaker who once said the GOP's health care mantra was "If you get sick, America...die quickly." An outspoken urologist with a grudge against Democrats and Obamacare should give Grayson, known for his office's entertaining mailers and occasionally outrageous remarks, plenty of material to work with.

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