Daniel Schulman

Senior Editor

Based in DC, Dan covers politics and national security. His work has appeared in the Boston Globe Magazine, the Village Voice, the Columbia Journalism Review, and other publications. He is the author of the new Koch brothers biography, Sons of Wichita (Grand Central Publishing). Email him at dschulman (at) motherjones.com.

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Cowboys of Kabul Plead Guilty, But the Ride Ain't Over

| Wed Sep. 16, 2009 10:37 AM EDT

Less than two weeks before they were scheduled to stand trial, Del and Barbara Spier pleaded guilty to charges of defrauding the US government in connection with their company's security operation in Afghanistan. In July, I detailed how the Texas grandparents, bankrupt as of 2002, cashed in on the contracting bonanza with a little help from their friends at the Louis Berger Group. The construction firm, selected by USAID to rebuild crucial parts of Afghanistan's bombed-out infrastructure, handed the Spiers' company, US Protection and Investigations (USPI), a noncompete contract to protect its employees and subcontractors in the field. In the years that followed, the Justice Department charged, the Spiers proceeded to systematically bilk the government, billing for nonexistent expenses from fictitious companies and inflating the number of Afghan guards on their payroll.

USPI's shady business practices extended beyond fraud. The company cut deals with local militia commanders (one of them accused of a range of wrongdoing, including the attempted kidnapping of Afghanistan's then-attorney general), paying their men a per diem in exchange for performing guard duties. Many of these ragtag soldiers were ill-trained, their loyalties shaky. Some apparently used their authority to engage in criminal activity, including drug trafficking and petty shakedowns. Ex-USPI supervisors I spoke with had no illusion that these guards would hold their ground if the going got tough. "If it came down to a firefight, they would have bailed on us," one told me. 

Justice Dept.: Blackwater Contractor Saw Killing Iraqis as 9/11 Payback

| Tue Sep. 8, 2009 11:55 AM EDT

For sport, they rolled through the streets of Baghdad hurling frozen oranges and water bottles at civilians and nearby vehicles, trying to smash windshields and injure bystanders. Convoying through the city in armored vehicles, the contractors fired their weapons indiscriminately. One member of the Blackwater security team known as Raven 23 regularly bragged about his body count and viewed killing Iraqis as "payback for 9/11."

These allegations are contained in court records [PDF] filed on Monday by Justice Department lawyers prosecuting five Blackwater contractors for the September 2007 shooting frenzy in Baghdad's Nisour Square that killed 14 Iraqis and wounded 20 others. Anticipating that lawyers representing the contractors will argue that they were acting in self defense, the prosecution is seeking to introduce evidence that "several of the defendants had harbored a deep hostility toward Iraqi civilians which they demonstrated in words and deeds." The charges are similar to those that recently emerged in civil lawsuits against Blackwater, stemming from the Nisour Square episode.

According to the court filing:

In addition to verbal expressions of hatred towards Iraqi civilians, the defendants engaged in unprovoked and aggressive behavior toward unarmed Iraqi civilians in Baghdad. In so doing, the defendants routinely acted in disregard of the use of force policies that they were required to follow as a condition of their employment as Blackwater guards.

...

This evidence tends to establish that the defendants fired at innocent Iraqis not because they actually believed that they were in imminent danger of serious bodily injury and actually believed that they had no alternative to the use of deadly force, but rather that they fired at innocent Iraqi civilians because of their hostility toward Iraqis and their grave indifference to the harm that their actions would cause.

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