Kiera Butler

Kiera Butler

Senior Editor

A senior editor at Mother Jones, Kiera covers health, food, and the environment. She is the author of the new book Raise: What 4-H Teaches 7 Million Kids—and How Its Lessons Could Change Food and Farming Forever (University of California Press).

 

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RIP Archie Green

| Wed Mar. 25, 2009 12:40 PM EDT






Over the weekend, Archie Green, grandfather of labor history, passed away in his San Francisco home at the age of 91. Over at Daily Yonder, Julie Ardery has written Green a great eulogy chronicling his many and varied accomplishments:

Archie, as he was universally known, was a scholar of what he called “laborlore” – the expressive culture of working people. For five decades he studied hillbilly music and pile-drivers’ tales. He made inventories of  “tin men” – the showpieces of sheet metal workers -- and analyzed sailors’ slang.  He recorded songs by millworkers and miners’ wives. Working on until just months before his death, he wrote countless articles, both academic and popular, and five books, including Only a Miner, his landmark study of coal-mining music.

Born in Winnipeg to Russian Jewish parents in 1917, Green spent most of his childhood in LA. He attended UCLA and UC Berkeley for college, and spent the first part of his adult life building ships on the waterfront. But in 1959, he went back to school, and over the next few years earned degrees in both library science and folklore. He spent the better part of the '60s and '70s digging up and dusting off forgotten bits of what he called "laborlore"—legends, folksongs, and stories of individual workers. In 1976, he convinced Congress to pass the American Folklife Preservation Act and create the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. In recent years, he worked with the San Francisco based Fund for Labor Culture and History and helped organize  Laborlore Conversations, a series of conferences on workers' culture past and present that drew a crowd of historians, activists, union members, and many others.

Mother Jones is especially indebted to Green, since without him, our namesake, Mary "Mother Jones" Harris might have been forgotten—he recovered her legacy in 1960. Check out the folksong "The Death of Mother Jones" here. Sure wish I could hear it. If anyone knows where an MP3 lives, do tell.

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Iraqi Refugee Stories

| Tue Mar. 24, 2009 12:41 PM EDT
You've likely heard about the 2 million Iraqi refugees living in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, the Gulf States, Iran, Turkey, and Yemen, but Iraqi Refugee Stories brings those statistics to life with videos of displaced people describing the circumstances that forced them out out of their homeland.

The site has a bunch of interesting information, includine an interactive map showing where the refugees live now.

Some of the most moving stories:

Happy 50th, Barbie

| Mon Mar. 9, 2009 7:22 PM EDT
I never got into Barbies. I did once babysit for a little girl who liked to pretend her Barbies were going out on dates to a restaurant called the Sweetheart Date Residence, a dining experience that always ended the same way: Barbie and Ken tried to order something awesomely romantic, like steak or spaghetti, but all the waiter would bring them was a big bowl of dirt. Which he then poured over their heads. Poor Barbie and Ken could never catch a break.

Banal though my own Barbie memories may be, the famously disproportionate plastic princess holds a special place in most ladies' hearts. Yesterday was Barbie's 50th birthday (an event NY Times op-ed contributor Porochista Khakpour excellently refers to as "cougarrific"). To mark this milestone, the Times offered not one, but (at least) two Barbie-themed bits: the aforementioned Op-Ed, "Islamic Revolution Barbie," which is actually a really nice little memoir of how the dolls didn't help the writer transition from her childhood in Iran to adolescence in the States. The best part her description of Sara and Dara, the Muslim equivalents of Barbie and Ken:

Van Jones To Be Green Jobs Czar?

| Mon Mar. 9, 2009 6:18 PM EDT

Word has it that environmental advocate Van Jones is going to be offered a position in Obama's cabinet. Not sure yet exactly what it'll be; some say green jobs czar, but Grist's source says that's "an overstatement."

Title aside, Jones has the necessary chops: He founded the green jobs nonprofit Green for All, and what with all his recent speaking gigs, book tours, and buzz, he's got the connections. When we interviewed Jones last year, he talked about government's role in creating a green economy:

MJ: How do we get to the tipping point where the rules change. Does it have to come from the very highest levels?
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