Kiera Butler

Kiera Butler

Senior Editor

A senior editor at Mother Jones, Kiera covers health, food, and the environment. She is the author of the new book Raise: What 4-H Teaches 7 Million Kids—and How Its Lessons Could Change Food and Farming Forever (University of California Press).


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Tar Sands Bad for Caribou

| Thu Apr. 9, 2009 1:33 PM EDT

If health problems and polluted rivers weren't enough reason to worry aboout Canada's energy boom, here's another red flag: Declining caribou. According to a report scheduled to be released today by the Canadian government, herds of woodland caribou are struggling to survive in the boreal forests of southern Canada:

Parts of the highly technical, 300-page report show caribou herds are likeliest to decline in northern Alberta, northern Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories.

A boom in natural resources such as oil and gas has spurred industrial development in those parts of the country, disturbing the caribou's habitat.

Of 57 recognized herds, 29 are are "not self sustaining," says the report. If the current trend continues, woodland caribou could be gone by the end of the century. For a great visual, check out National Geographic's photo essay on the tar sands. Doesn't exactly look like caribou paradise.

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Boys Are Pilots. Girls Are Stewardesses.

| Wed Apr. 8, 2009 6:28 PM EDT

Back in the '70s everything was so much simpler. This collection of gender unbending images apparently exists in the nebulous space between satire and not satire.

Post Office Bailout?

| Thu Mar. 26, 2009 4:34 PM EDT
If you're like most people, you've probably given up a few extravagances in recent months. Vacations? Fancy dinners? Mailing a letter?

Yes, we're onto you. You've been cutting corners by denying your great aunt her birthday card. And because of your penny pinching ways, the USPS is about to run out of money. According to Postmaster General John Potter, the postal service is on track to be bankrupt before the end of the year.
Potter told a House subcommittee Wednesday the lingering question is: Which bills will get paid and which will not.
He said he will make sure that salaries are paid, but also said other bills might have to wait. Potter is seeking permission to reduce mail delivery to five days a week and wants to reduce other costs.
Nice one.

Will the Feds Spray the Border?

| Thu Mar. 26, 2009 1:58 PM EDT
The latest addition to the Border Patrol's most-wanted list isn't an illegal immigrant, but a plant.

Well, okay, a plant that could conceal illegal immigrants, the Patrol fears. The plant in question is Carrizo cane, an invasive weed that grows in dense thickets along the border. The Feds' plan (which, predictably, has drawn some Agent Orange comparisons) was to spray the cane with the herbicide Imazapyr, but not everyone is thrilled about that:
A lawsuit accused the Department of Homeland Security of violating the National Environmental Policy Act regarding the now-delayed U.S. Border Patrol plans to conduct aerial spraying of an herbicide on carrizo (kah-DEE'-zoh) cane near the Rio Grande.
Residents of two Laredo neighborhoods on Tuesday sued DHS in a lawsuit which alleged the public wasn't sufficiently notified about the spraying program, the Laredo Morning Times reported in a story for Wednesday's editions.


RIP Archie Green

| Wed Mar. 25, 2009 12:40 PM EDT

Over the weekend, Archie Green, grandfather of labor history, passed away in his San Francisco home at the age of 91. Over at Daily Yonder, Julie Ardery has written Green a great eulogy chronicling his many and varied accomplishments:

Archie, as he was universally known, was a scholar of what he called “laborlore” – the expressive culture of working people. For five decades he studied hillbilly music and pile-drivers’ tales. He made inventories of  “tin men” – the showpieces of sheet metal workers -- and analyzed sailors’ slang.  He recorded songs by millworkers and miners’ wives. Working on until just months before his death, he wrote countless articles, both academic and popular, and five books, including Only a Miner, his landmark study of coal-mining music.

Born in Winnipeg to Russian Jewish parents in 1917, Green spent most of his childhood in LA. He attended UCLA and UC Berkeley for college, and spent the first part of his adult life building ships on the waterfront. But in 1959, he went back to school, and over the next few years earned degrees in both library science and folklore. He spent the better part of the '60s and '70s digging up and dusting off forgotten bits of what he called "laborlore"—legends, folksongs, and stories of individual workers. In 1976, he convinced Congress to pass the American Folklife Preservation Act and create the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. In recent years, he worked with the San Francisco based Fund for Labor Culture and History and helped organize  Laborlore Conversations, a series of conferences on workers' culture past and present that drew a crowd of historians, activists, union members, and many others.

Mother Jones is especially indebted to Green, since without him, our namesake, Mary "Mother Jones" Harris might have been forgotten—he recovered her legacy in 1960. Check out the folksong "The Death of Mother Jones" here. Sure wish I could hear it. If anyone knows where an MP3 lives, do tell.
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