Monika Bauerlein


Since taking the helm at Mother Jones in 2006, Monika and editor-in-chief Clara Jeffery have won two National Magazine Awards, launched a nine-person Washington bureau, relaunched the website, given birth, and forgotten what it’s like to sleep.

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Monika Bauerlein is CEO of Mother Jones. Previously, she served as co-editor with Clara Jeffery, who is now editor-in-chief. Together, they spearheaded an era of editorial growth and innovation, marked by two National Magazine Awards for general excellence, the addition of a 12-person Washington Bureau, and an overhaul of the organization’s digital strategy that grew's traffic more than tenfold. She has also worked as Mother Jones' investigative editor, focusing on long-form projects marrying in-depth reportage, document sleuthing, and narrative appeal, and as an alternative-weekly editor, a correspondent for US and European publications in Washington, D.C. and at the United Nations, an AP stringer, corporate trainer, translator, sausage slinger and fishing-line packager. She lives in Oakland.

MoJo or Latte? You Decide.

| Wed Dec. 30, 2009 5:33 AM EST

We'll keep this short. It takes a lot of things to do investigative journalism, but none of them are worth a damn without you, our readers. Your support is our biggest source of revenue—we're like public radio that way, only we can't hold your programming hostage until you pitch in. And yet many of you do pitch in, giving $5, $10, whatever you can. You understand that at a time when our political system seems dominated by behind-the-scenes dealmaking, we need independent reporting to keep democracy alive. And you understand that such muckraking never has paid for itself, and certainly doesn't now at a time of media and economic crisis. You, and a lot of frugal budgeting, kept us going through a year when other publications fired reporters left and right, or just shut down altogether. But the year is not over yet, and we haven't been able to quite close the shortfall left by the implosion of advertising and other commercial revenue. Your help will allow us to keep going in 2010—and we promise we'll put it to good use, especially in keeping tabs on those who got all of us into this mess to start with. It's easy—you can give any amount that works for you, in seconds, via credit card or PayPal. Thank you. 

And if you're not yet convinced that you, our readers, are amazing, consider this letter we got a few days ago. 

I'm sorry that I am only managing to donate $5, at this time. My Husband and I work for Ford, we build the Mustang.  We just returned from a 3 week layoff, it was to readjust inventory.  In 2 weeks we will be laid off again, in fact 14 weeks are scheduled for 2010. I wish Americans would buy American.  We're damn good workers, Our Car is quality built...our sweat and lives go into every vehicle.

I LOVE Your articles. I love that I can hear a truth. I owe You something, even if it's only $5....still, please forgive me that I'm not allowed to send more. I will when I can.  

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Copenhagen: Time To Get Over Ourselves

| Mon Dec. 7, 2009 3:16 AM EST

A few hours ago, the United Nations agency that is organizing the Copenhagen climate conference sent out a beleaguered-sounding email saying that the conference venue fits 15,000, but 34,000 people—delegates from around the world, journalists, NGO representatives—are trying to attend, so they're implementing a "quota system." Does that mean Al and Leo will have to wait in line?

For updates on that and many other pressing questions, bookmark the Blue Marble, MoJo's environmental blog, which will be covering the climate talks 24/7. Our Washington bureau chief, David Corn, is headed there as we write, as is blogger Kate Sheppard, and essayist Bill McKibben. And because climate change is the biggest story of our lifetimes, we've also joined forces with a group of other journalism shops, including the Nation, Grist, Treehugger, the Center for Investigative Reporting/Frontline World, the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting, and The Uptake—together, we have several dozen reporters on the ground, and we'll be using a nifty by-journalists-for-journalists technology called Publish2 to pull together all of their posts and stories. (Check the right-hand column of the Blue Marble for the feed, and also this page.)

Hey, if any group of people is harder to get to collaborate than politicians, it's probably journalists. If the latter can get over our myriad hangups and work together, maybe there's hope for the former. (P.S.—while you're thinking about it, why not put a picture of your kid--or your pet, favorite celebrity, or self—on our climate cover? It's a fun way to let your friends, or your representatives, know where you stand.)

Watch: How GM is displacing indigenous Brazilians to create offsets for its SUVs

| Wed Nov. 4, 2009 11:42 AM EST

Mark Schapiro's story from our November/December issue, "GM's Money Trees," on a controversial carbon-offset in Brazil, has just gone live online. Traveling with Mark in the Amazon was a team from Frontline/World, the PBS investigative series, which has a multimedia companion piece to this story up on its new site, CarbonWatch. Here's a sample of what they found.


Make Your Own MoJo Climate Cover!

| Fri Oct. 23, 2009 6:25 AM EDT

Impatient? Skip this post, start playing with the app!
Still here? Okay. If you're sick of the political inaction (or worse) on the most important issue of our time; if you think your kid or your cat is the cutest ever; if you really need to one-up those relatives who always send out those perfect family greeting cards; or if you're frustrated by stick-figure cover models made possible only via the magic of Photoshop; well, Mother Jones is here to help.
We've made an app that lets you put your kid/cat/aunt/whatever on the cover of our issue devoted to the political and economic changes that climate change will bring. Send it to your friends, your members of Congress, even President Obama. We'll feature some on our site (if you give us permission, of course).
This is just one (fun) part of our efforts on this topic. We're also pulling together a broad collaborative effort between many prominent news organizations to cover this topic better than any of us could on our own. (Read an interview on this initiative here.) In a few weeks we're sending founder and MoJo contributor Bill McKibben, MoJo DC bureau chief David Corn and reporter Kate Sheppard to Copenhagen to cover the global climate talks. There, they'll team up with other news organizations, and even comedian Eugene Mirman, to give the conference the kind of fearless coverage it deserves.
We need your help to support our coverage. To send Bill, David, and Kate to Cophenhagen and keep the heat on. Imagine what it would mean if we hadn't exposed how ExxonMobil has been funding climate change denialists. Or how the US Chamber of Commerce inflated its membership numbers as part of its anti-climate initiative (reporting that's been hailed by the Washington Post Rachel Maddow, and the New Yorker, among others). Or why seemingly disparate weather issues have scientists so worried.
So please consider donating to Mother Jones. As a nonprofit, we depend on you to respect and support the kind of work we do. And when it comes to the climate, all of our futures hang in the balance.
Oh, and... go make your cover! And if you like it, tell your friends.

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