Stephanie Mencimer

Stephanie Mencimer

Reporter

Stephanie works in Mother Jones' Washington bureau. A Utah native and graduate of a crappy public university not worth mentioning, she has spent several years hanging out with angry white people who occasionally don tricorne hats and come to lunch meetings heavily armed.

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Stephanie covers legal affairs and domestic policy in Mother Jones' Washington bureau. She is the author of Blocking the Courthouse Door: How the Republican Party and Its Corporate Allies Are Taking Away Your Right to Sue. A contributing editor of the Washington Monthly, a former investigative reporter at the Washington Post, and a senior writer at the Washington City Paper, she was nominated for a National Magazine Award in 2004 for a Washington Monthly article about myths surrounding the medical malpractice system. In 2000, she won the Harry Chapin Media award for reporting on poverty and hunger, and her 2010 story in Mother Jones of the collapse of the welfare system in Georgia and elsewhere won a Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism.

Are Journalists Running the Obama Administration?

| Thu Mar. 5, 2009 2:00 PM EST
Right-wingers are always complaining that journalists are hopelessly biased liberals, but lately they seem to think they have new evidence to support the old beef. The latest edition of "Obama-Biden Watch," a newsletter published by the rabidly conservative group Citizens United, contains a short feature on all of the mainstream reporters who've recently joined the Obama administration.

Among those singled out by CU: Chicago Tribune reporter Jill Zuckerman, who's headed to the Transportation Department; former Time magazine Washington bureau chief Jay Carney, who's gone to work in Biden's office; Peter Gosselin, a former Los Angeles Times reporter, who's now a speechwriter for Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner; and former ABC News correspondent Linda Douglass, who worked on the Obama campaign and is rumored to be slated for a job at Health and Human Services. The newsletter came out before the news of Obama's appointment of Nancy Ann DeParle to a senior post at HHS, but no doubt her marriage to New York Times poverty reporter Jason DeParle might have rated a mention as well.
 
Of course plenty of journalists also went to work in the Bush administration (think Tony Snow and Karen Hughes), so the liberal bias connection is still, as always, pretty weak. But it's even weaker if you consider that this latest flight of reporters into government is happening at the same time the newspaper industry is imploding. It's not entirely surprising to find reporters from the bankrupt Tribune Company papers on the list of new Obama administration officials. In this economic climate, the government is one of the few places that's hiring!

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Supreme Court Puts Kabosh on Vibration Monument

| Wed Feb. 25, 2009 12:43 PM EST

Bad news this morning for Summum, the Utah religious group famous for its mummification practices. The Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, rejected the group's arguments that the First Amendment required the city of Pleasant Grove to install a Summum monument displaying its "Seven Aphorisms" (Number 3: Vibration) in a public park. Summum had argued that because the city had accepted a Ten Commandments monument for the park, rejecting the Summum monument violated the group's free speech rights. A lower federal court had agreed with the Summum, but the justices in Washington were clearly swayed by arguments that a favorable ruling for Summum would open the door to a "parade of horrors" in public space everywhere.

The Summum clearly had a sympathetic case, especially to stalwart believers in the separation of church and state. But they weren't helped by the very real example of Reverend Fred Phelps, the infamous head of the Westboro Baptist Church in Kansas. Phelps, who runs www.godhatesfags.com, wants to erect a public monument in Casper, Wyoming depicting Matthew Shepard, the gay University of Wyoming student who was murdered in 1998. The caption would read, "Matthew Shepard entered Hell October 12, 1998, in defiance of God's warning 'thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind; it is abomination.'" If the Summum had prevailed, Phelps might have, too. Justice Samuel Alito wrote that picking and choosing monuments for a public park was not the same thing as deciding who can and can't speak in a public place, as Summum had argued. Alito said "the display of a permanent monument in a public park" requires a different analysis.

My home state of Utah no doubt breathed a sigh of relief at the news, as Summum has spent years tormenting city officials across the state with its proposed monuments, largely as an effort to get rid of the many Ten Commandments monuments in public parks. Today's decision finally puts an end to the campaign, which really is too bad. As a journalist, you always have to root for the story, and this one, where a group that mummifies pets goes up against elected officials who are mostly members of a faith that once practiced polygamy, is pretty good.

Liberals Fight Gun Control To Win Abortion Rights

| Tue Feb. 24, 2009 1:13 PM EST
Last year, liberals in DC were furious with the US Supreme Court for striking down the city's strict gun-control law. In DC v Heller, the high court found that individuals have the right to bear arms, and not just within the 2nd Amendment's famous "well-armedregulated militia." Since then, gun-rights groups have used that decision to challenge gun-control statutes all across the country. Strangely enough, the National Rifle Association is getting some help in at least one of those case from liberal Yale law profs and other activists normally on the other side of such fights. Why?

Legal Times' Tony Mauro explains that the liberal lawyers see progressive benefits to the cases. Doug Kendall, founder of the Constitutional Accountability Center, tells Mauro that if successful, the lawsuits "would have a "lift-all-boats" effect, strengthening free speech, and possibly even abortion and gay rights, at the same time that it bolsters the right to bear arms." Of course, gun control groups aren't so happy about the new-found alliance. The legal director of the Brady Center to End Gun Violence tells Mauro, "It's unfortunate that they would choose to participate in a gun case to grind that particular ax." Still, given that most people think gun control laws don't work, maybe trading useless gun control measures for stronger legal protections for the rights of women, minorities and gays is actually a pretty inspired idea.

Supreme Court May Hear Mercury In Tuna Case

| Wed Feb. 18, 2009 2:02 PM EST
Last fall, we published a story about a woman named Deborah Fellner who had sued Chicken of the Sea alleging that she had gotten mercury poisoning from eating the company's canned albacore tuna. Tuna companies have known at least since the 1970s that canned tuna can contain high levels of mercury, which can cause neurological problems that resemble Parkinson's disease and other ailments. (Fellner's hair fell out, among other things.) Yet a New Jersey federal court initially threw out her case thanks to help from the Bush FDA. At the request of the tuna industry in another lawsuit, the FDA had claimed that such lawsuits were "preempted" by federal law because it was already doing such a good job of regulating tuna.  A judge agreed, and using that decision, Chicken of the Sea claimed that Fellner's lawsuit was likewise trumped by federal regulators, largely because they had posting a warning about eating mercury in fish on the FDA website. It was a pretty flimsy argument, and eventually, an appeals court reversed in favor of Fellner. Her lawsuit has been proceeding ever since. And now it looks like it might go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.
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Tue Sep. 9, 2014 6:30 AM EDT | Updated Tue Dec. 16, 2014 10:10 AM EDT