Stephanie Mencimer

Stephanie Mencimer

Reporter

Stephanie works in Mother Jones' Washington bureau. A Utah native and graduate of a crappy public university not worth mentioning, she has spent several years hanging out with angry white people who occasionally don tricorne hats and come to lunch meetings heavily armed.

Full Bio | Get my RSS |

Stephanie covers legal affairs and domestic policy in Mother Jones' Washington bureau. She is the author of Blocking the Courthouse Door: How the Republican Party and Its Corporate Allies Are Taking Away Your Right to Sue. A contributing editor of the Washington Monthly, a former investigative reporter at the Washington Post, and a senior writer at the Washington City Paper, she was nominated for a National Magazine Award in 2004 for a Washington Monthly article about myths surrounding the medical malpractice system. In 2000, she won the Harry Chapin Media award for reporting on poverty and hunger, and her 2010 story in Mother Jones of the collapse of the welfare system in Georgia and elsewhere won a Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism.

The Birthers' Next Target: Marco Rubio

| Thu Oct. 20, 2011 11:56 AM EDT
US Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)

For the past several years, conspiracy-pushing activists have been alleging that President Obama is not qualified to be president because, they claim, he was born in Kenya or that he's not really a "natural born citizen." The birthers have filed lawsuits, bought billboards reading, "Where's the birth certificate?", and sought legislation that would require presidential candidates to prove their American citizenship before gaining access to state ballots. None of this has gone anywhere. Most of the bills have failed. And, in a fit of exasperation in April prompted by Donald Trump's embrace of the issue, Obama defused much of the birther campaign by posting his long-form birth certificate online.

But the birthers haven't gone away. They've simply found a new target: up-and-coming GOP political star Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.). Rubio's name has been floated as a potential vice presidential candidate for 2012 and a future GOP presidential candidate. But the birthers are already arguing that, like Obama, he is ineligible to hold either office.

Birther Charles Kerchner has a blog that was once devoted mostly to Obama, but lately he's been on a campaign to illustrate that Rubio is not a natural born citizen, and thus, ineligible to enter the White House. Kerchner's logic is convoluted—something of a trend among the birther set. He claims that Rubio is actually a Cuban citizen, even though Rubio was born on American soil, in Miami, in 1971. But Rubio's parents were Cubans, who didn't become US citizens until 1975. (Kerchner went so far as to obtain Rubio's parents' naturalization papers from the National Archives to prove his point.) Thus, Kerchner posits, Rubio doesn't meet the "natural born" requirement set out in the Constitution, because his parents weren't American citizens. Birthers have tried this argument on Obama as well, because his father was Kenyan. But the argument didn't have much success then, and it's not likely to have much success now.

Kerchner isn't the the only one in his camp who believes Rubio can't be president. The queen of the birther movement, Orly Taitz, also agrees. Taitz, who has spent years in court suing Obama over his eligibility, told the St. Petersburg Times this week, "We need the court to finally adjudicate this issue, who is a natural born citizen." Rubio, for his part, was nonchalant about becoming the birthers' newest target. "The price of our freedom and our liberty is that people can go out and spend a lot of time on stuff like this," he told the paper. "For us, the more important thing is to focus on our job."

The birthers clearly need more to work on, given the extent to which they've exhausted most avenues for challenging Obama. Rubio will certainly help fill the bill, and just in time, too, for the upcoming "birther summit" in March. Kerchner and others who've been undaunted by Obama's efforts to take the steam out of their movement are planning a "massive" rally and summit in DC, where they intend to protest Washington's "continued cover up of the fraud that has been perpetrated upon us."

Advertise on MotherJones.com

The Tea Party's Hatfield and McCoys

| Tue Oct. 18, 2011 2:42 PM EDT

Amy Kremer is the co-chair of the Tea Party Express, a fairly successful tea party enterprise created by a couple of California GOP political consultants. Jenny Beth Martin is a co-coordinator of Tea Party Patriots, a large tea party umbrella group which Kremer helped found. Both women are from Georgia. They were once friends. Today, though, it's safe to say that they basically hate each other.

The Tea Party's Debt Commission

| Tue Oct. 18, 2011 10:38 AM EDT

The congressional "supercommittee" is due to produce a report next month recommending ways to reduce the federal budget deficit by at least $1.5 trillion over the next decade. But the tea party movement looks like it's going to try to preempt the committee by not only releasing its own report of budget cutting recommendations, but by having Congress hold hearings on its plan a week earlier.

The tea party-associated group Freedomworks, which is headed up by former House Minority Leader Dick Armey, has created its own "Tea Party Debt Commission," the New York Times reports. Freedomworks' commission held a series of hearings around the country and also crowd-sourced some ideas through a web site. None of its ideas, of course, involve actually raising revenue.

Rupert Murdoch Compares US Education System to Third World Country's

| Fri Oct. 14, 2011 12:48 PM EDT
Rupert Murdoch

News Corp. boss Rupert Murdoch has spent the last six months or so battling a rash of bad press over allegations that his UK-based News of the World tabloid engaged in phone-hacking and other unseemly journalistic practices that resulted in his closing the paper all together. His most public appearances have been before the British Parliament, defending his company from a high-level investigation. But on Friday, Murdoch made an altogether different sort of appearance in the US, headlining an education summit hosted by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

Murdoch has taken a sudden interest in the plight of poor American school children languishing in substandard schools, which he says have lower standards than "American Idol." Of course, Murdoch's interest in public schools seems mostly because of the money to be made there. He's said that he sees the American education sector as a $500 billion market that's largely been untapped by companies like his. News Corp. ventured into this world last year by purchasing the ed tech company Wireless Generation and hiring former New York City schools chancellor Joel Klein.

Tue Jul. 21, 2015 1:15 PM EDT
Wed Jul. 9, 2014 11:44 AM EDT
Wed Apr. 30, 2014 11:07 AM EDT
Tue Dec. 3, 2013 6:55 AM EST