Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

Reporter

Tim Murphy is a reporter in MoJo's DC bureau. Last summer he logged 22,000 miles while blogging about his cross-country road trip for Mother Jones. His writing has been featured in Slate and the Washington Monthly. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy [at] motherjones [dot] com.

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Bachmann Summit With Anti-Gay Heavy-Metal Minister Cancelled

| Thu Jul. 14, 2011 10:02 AM EDT

One of Rep. Michele Bachmann's more controversial associations is her relationship with Bradlee Dean, a heavy-metal drummer who runs an anti-gay ministry in her district called You Can Run But You Cannot Hide International. As we reported in May, Dean has stated unequivocally that homosexuality is illegal. Not that it should be illegal, but that it is currently a crime, and that gays are legally barred from holding public office. (News of the landmark 2003 Supreme Court decision Lawrence v. Texas travels slowly.) Dean also believes that gay marriage is part of secret Muslim plot to impose Islamic Sharia law on the general populace, and that President Obama has cut the nation loose from its Constitutional moorings. This despite the fact that Dean was until recently a member of a sovereign citizen organization that requires supporters to renounce their American citizenship. Bachmann has raised money for Dean's organization and prayed for the group to turn Minnesota into a "burning incense." "Thank you now for this time," she said, "and pour a double blessing, Lord, a triple blessing onto this ministry."

The fact that Bachmann was scheduled to appear alongside Dean at the "Tea Party Jamboree" in Kansas City, Kansas, in September was, all things considered, kind of a big deal. The event's lineup was problematic as well: Jerome Corsi, author of the birther manifesto Where's the Birth Certificate?, was scheduled to attend, as was his boss at WorldNetDaily, Joseph Farah. With Bachmann, guided by chief strategist Ed Rollins, attempting to rebrand herself as a kinder, gentler conservative candidate, would she stay the course? Now, Andy Birkey reports, she won't have to make that choice; the entire event has been called off:

Organizers for the Freedom Jamboree, billed as the national tea party straw poll convention, announced on Wednesday that the event has been canceled due to low attendance. The conference had pulled in two of Minnesota most controversial figures, presidential candidate Michele Bachmann and rightwing preacher Bradlee Dean. It was also being organized by Iowa's Bob Vander Plaats, whose organization, The Family Leader, sparked an uproar in the state after it released a presidential pledge on marriage.

So Bachmann dodged a bullet. Meanwhile, this isn't going to do anything to quell suggestions that Vander Plaats, whose marriage pledge has been rebuked by GOP front-runner Mitt Romney and fellow contender Tim Pawlenty, has lost his mojo.

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Romney: Iowa Marriage Pledge is 'Undignified'

| Wed Jul. 13, 2011 10:24 AM EDT

Since being unveiled last Thursday, the Iowa Family Leader's "Marriage Vow" has caused a bit of controversy. The pledge, which the influential conservative group says is a prerequisite for an endorsement, included language—since removed—suggesting that black families were more stable during the days slavery than they are today. Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum were quick to sign on, but the rest of the GOP contenders took a more cautious approach. Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman issued a non-response, saying that he doesn't sign any pledges; former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty said he's still studying it. After remaining mum on the issue, though, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney has finally made up his mind:

Andrea Saul, a spokeswoman for Romney, told The Associated Press in a written statement Tuesday that Romney "strongly supports traditional marriage," but that the oath "contained references and provisions that were undignified and inappropriate for a presidential campaign."

It's unclear which parts of the pledge Team Romney found so undignified and inappropriate but there a bunch of contenders: the aforementioned slavery bit, the comparison of gay marriage to polygamy, the proposed ban on pornography, and the rejection of Sharia-compliant Islam (which is, essentially, all Islam). Given Romney's previous support for the rights of gay couples, his embrace of abortion rights, and his recent defense of the patriotism and religious freedom of American Muslims, the pledge would have marked an abrupt shift in tone even for Romney. His explicit rejection of the document is yet another sign the front-runner is swearing off social conservative red-meat this time around, after playing to the base (and failing) in 2008.

At least in this case, it was a smart move. By staying mum on the pledge for a few days, Romney allowed Bachmann to seize the initiative and fall flat, he gave the Family Leader time to acknowledge that its pledge was actually a bit extreme in parts, and he made Tim Pawlenty—who is still reading the pledge, apparently, so don't distract him—look awkward and dithering.

VIDEO: MoJo Presses Bachmann on Gay Therapy Stories

| Tue Jul. 12, 2011 1:17 PM EDT

Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) has been notoriously outspoken when it comes to her position on gays, contending that homosexuality is a "dysfunction," that it is a satanic evil to even use the word "gay" to describe homosexuals, and that gays and lesbians use public schools to recruit children to their sinful ranks. But when I caught up with Bachmann this afternoon on a Washington, DC, street and asked her about media reports by The Nation and ABC News' Nightline reporting that her family's counseling clinics practice controversial "reparative" therapy to turn gay people straight through the power of prayer, the Republican presidential candidate was uncharacteristically silent.

Statements from a former patient of Bachmann & Associates and undercover video made public by an LGBT activist who secretly filmed his therapy sessions both indicate that the clinic (which has received $130,000 in state and federal funding) does engage in reparative therapy—despite an unequivocal denial from Bachmann's husband, Marcus, in 2006. Reparative therapy, based on the premise that homosexuality is a deviant lifestyle caused by psychological troubles and sexual abuse, has been rejected by every major psychological and psychiatric association. Some studies have suggested it could have harmful effects on patients who undergo such treatment.

Bachmann, who touts her ownership of this small business in her stump speech, has not been keen on answering questions about what Bachmann & Associates actually does. The congresswoman declined to comment to The Nation; her presidential campaign, though, did issue a statement to ABC News: "Those matters are protected by patient-client confidentiality. The Bachmanns are in no position ethically, legally, or morally to discuss specific courses of treatment concerning the clinic's patients." Though it would breach a patient's privacy rights for the Bachmanns to discuss treatment provided to a specific person, they are certainly free to talk generally about their methods and services. Pressed by a local ABC affiliate at a Monday campaign stop in Iowa, Bachmann dodged the subject, saying, "We're very proud of our business, and we're proud of all job creators in the United States. That's what people really care about."

Today, I encountered Bachmann near MoJo's bureau in downtown DC. She was having lunch with an aide in a sandwich shop. After they departed the restaurant, I asked if she would respond to these recent reports. She said nothing—not a word—and would not even look in my direction. She kept walking at a brisk pace. I repeated the question a few times, as her aide tried to prevent me from getting too close to the congresswoman. The aide noted repeatedly that Bachmann was not taking questions. At no time did Bachmann break her stride. 

You can watch the exchange for yourself below. (Warning: My flip-cam skills need improvement.)

Rick Perry Ally: Statue of Liberty is a 'Demonic Idol'

| Tue Jul. 12, 2011 1:03 PM EDT

Texas Governor Rick Perry's August prayer festival, to be held in Houston's Reliant Stadium, has put him in the company of some pretty controversial folks. Organizers of the event have said that the purpose of the event is, in part, to convert non-Christians to Christianity. And as we noted last week, one pastor who's signed on as an official endorser of the rally has argued that Oprah Winfrey is a harbinger of the Antichrist.

So what's the latest? Via Right Wing Watch's Brian Tashman we learn that one of the event's latest endorsers has taken dead aim at Lady Liberty herself. Oklahoma City-based pastor John Benefiel, the head of the Heartland Apostlic Prayer Network, delivered a sermon last August arguing that America was being punished by God for filling its landscape with false idols. You know, like the Statue of Liberty:

Libertas is also called the Freedom Goddess, Lady Freedom, the Goddess of Liberty. You know there’s a statue in New York harbor called the Statue of Liberty. You know where we got it from? French Free Masons. Listen folks that is an idol, a demonic idol, right there in New York harbor. People say, 'well no it's patriotic.' What makes it patriotic? Why is it? It's a statue of a false goddess, the Queen of Heaven. We don't get liberty from a false goddess folks, we get our liberty from Jesus Christ.

Watch:

Students of American history will of course note that, in Ghostbusters II, the Statue of Liberty comes to life to defeat the demonic spirit of Vigo the Carpathian. How the mighty have fallen:

What Exactly Did Michele Bachmann Learn in Law School?

| Tue Jul. 12, 2011 11:16 AM EDT

Over at Religion Dispatches, Sarah Posner has an interesting look at Michele Bachmann's ideological roots, focusing on her law school years at Oral Roberts University. Oral Roberts, who famously built his school after receiving a direct order from God, isn't the story here; it's Herb Titus, a Christian attorney who helped found the law school and spent his career promoting an ideology known as Christian Reconstructionism—the idea that "Christianity is the basis of our law, that lawyers and judges should follow God's law, and that the failure to do so is evidence of a 'tyrannical,' leftist agenda." Here's Posner:

Bachmann's history of questioning Barack Obama's American-ness, or of espousing "normal people values," is rooted in the Reconstructionist conception of "American-ness." Not just Christian, but their kind of Christian; one who would obey God, exercise "dominion authority," and, most crucially, is one of their "brethren."

Titus, founder of Bachmann's law school, happens to be the architect of a legal theory—as far outside of the legal mainstream as his Establishment Clause theory—that Obama is not a "natural-born citizen," a designation that would render him ineligible to be president due to his "divided loyalties." Deuteronomy 17, he insists, demands that that the "king" be selected from one's own "brethren." As an outsider Obama isn't a "real" American, worthy—according to the bible or the Constitution—of being president.

Bachmann's not responsible for the views of everyone she associates with. But as folks begin to scrutinize her views more carefully, it's important to understand where she's actually coming from. As I've explained previously, her worldview might strike you as extreme (and at times conspiratorial), but there is a coherent method to it all.

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