Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

Reporter

Tim Murphy is a reporter in MoJo's DC bureau. Last summer he logged 22,000 miles while blogging about his cross-country road trip for Mother Jones. His writing has been featured in Slate and the Washington Monthly. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy [at] motherjones [dot] com.

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GOP Rock: Rick Perry (Drums), Jon Huntsman (Keys), Mitt Romney (Vox), Thad McCotter (Ax)

| Mon Aug. 29, 2011 2:01 AM EDT
Jon Huntsman on the keyboard.

We're still months away from the first meaningful votes in the GOP presidential primary, and a full 14 months away from 2012 election. But it's never too early to start scrutinizing the field. We've written pretty extensively on the various candidates' views on gay marriage, civil liberties, foreign policy, and (most notably) the economy. But in our effort to leave no stone unturned, we got to thinking: Where do the presidential contenders stand on music?

Here's an incomplete guide to their musical careers, their tastes, and the bizarre music they've inspired:

Jon Huntsman, keyboard: When Jon Huntsman was 18 years old, he dropped out of high school to join a prog rock band called Wizard. It was only a matter of time; Politico talked to a former classmate who "recalled the long-haired, diffident Salt Lake City high schooler sitting next to him in history class 'hitting his desk as if it were a piano.'" Now, watching the former Utah governor and US ambassador to China slog through a Republican primary that doesn't seem to have a place for him, you almost get the impression he's secretly plotting to ditch the campaign thing entirely and get the band back together.

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Newt Gingrich Fundraising Machine Shuts Down

| Fri Aug. 26, 2011 2:50 PM EDT
Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich is running for president.

Newt Gingrich has officially lost the future. The former Speaker of the House raised $52 million over the last four years through his political action committee, American Solutions for Winning the Future—but now that Gingrich has jumped ship to run his own (floundering) presidential campaign, the 527 he founded and chaired has officially shut down. Per Peter Stone:

To make his bid for the GOP nomination, Gingrich had to sever his ties with the 527, as federal election law requires for candidates, and that proved to be a big blow to its growth and ongoing operations, [chairman Joe] Gaylord said...

The group was well known in conservative policy circles for promoting a "Drill Here, Drill Now," drive to increase the use of domestic energy resources and was invariably a sharp critic of government regulations. This year, the group created a website called noMoreObamaCare.com to spur GOP lawmakers to repeal the sweeping health care reforms that the administration signed into law in 2010.

One election-law expert wasn't surprised by the group's quick demise. "Some political organizations are like one man shows on Broadway," quipped lawyer Larry Noble of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom in an interview with iWatch News . "Once the stars leave, the shows often fold."

As Alex Burns notes, Gaylord had initially planned to keep the PAC afloat while Gingrich ran for president; instead, it's become yet another casualty of his disastrous campaign.

Rick Perry Pledges to Investigate Intimidation of Gay Marriage Foes

| Fri Aug. 26, 2011 1:47 PM EDT
Texas Gov. Rick Perry is a favorite to be the Republican presidential nominee.

On Wednesday, Texas Governor Rick Perry signed a pledge to defund Planned Parenthood if elected President. On Thursday, he promised never to vacation in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. On Friday, he kept the streak alive by signing another pledge—this one from the National Organization for Marriage (NOM)—to support a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage. But the pledge actually goes much further than that, committing signees to a "appoint a presidential commission to investigate harassment of traditional marriage supporters," among other things. Here's what's in it:

  • Support and send to the states a federal marriage amendment defining marriage as one man and one woman,
  • Defend DOMA [the Defense of Marriage Act] in court,
  • Appoint judges and an attorney general who will respect the original meaning of the Constitution,
  • Appoint a presidential commission to investigate harassment of traditional marriage supporters,
  • Support legislation that would return to the people of D.C. their right to vote for marriage.

Really sweet of Perry to keep Washington, D.C. in his thoughts, one day after he called the city "seedy." As I noted before, Perry's two top rivals, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, have alread signed the pledge. Perry has faced criticism from the right—notably from former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum—for initially calling gay marriage a Tenth Amendment issue that should be settled by the states, before quickly backtracking. Perry has also suggested gay people should live a life of celibacy, and supported a law that would make it a misdemeanor for gay couples to have sex. 

What the Washington Post Gets Wrong on Dominionism

| Fri Aug. 26, 2011 10:10 AM EDT

The world's largest straw man, if I had to guess, is most likely located in central North Dakota, somewhere near the world's largest Holstein cow and the world's largest sandhill crane. But this Washington Post column, from former George W. Bush speechwriter Michael Gerson, certainly has to be a part of the conversation. It's a few days old, but it presents an argument that I imagine we'll be hearing pretty frequently over the next year or so: liberals are totally paranoid when it comes to the religious views of GOP presidential candidates. (To wit: Here are Ralph Reed and Lisa Miller making that exact point.)

Gerson, who is generally credited with applying an Evangelical varnish to Bush's every uterrance, takes on the argument—promoted to various degrees by Ryan Lizza, Forrest Wilder, Michelle Goldberg, and myself—that Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann are part of a movement to turn the country into a Christian state. Here's how Gerson summarizes that argument:

Perry admittedly doesn't attend a Dominionist church or make Dominionist arguments, but he once allowed himself to be prayed for by some suspicious characters. Bachmann once attended a school that had a law review that said some disturbing things. She assisted a professor who once spoke at a convention that included some alarming people. Her belief that federal tax rates should not be higher than 10 percent, Goldberg explains, is "common in Reconstructionist circles."

The evidence that Bachmann may countenance the death penalty for adulterers? Support for low marginal tax rates.

Bachmann is prone to Tea Party overstatement and religious-right cliches. She opened herself to criticism by recommending a book that features Southern Civil War revisionism. But there is no evidence from the careers of Bachmann or Perry that they wish to turn America into a theocratic prison camp.

Map of the Day: The Anti-Sharia Panic

| Fri Aug. 26, 2011 9:48 AM EDT

The Center for American Progress released a very comprehensive report Friday morning that traces the origins, extent, organs, and funding sources of the Islamophobia movement. The thesis is that there's no "vast right-wing conspiracy behind the rise of Islamophobia in our nation but rather a small, tightly networked group of misinformation experts guiding an effort that reaches millions of Americans through effective advocates, media partners, and grassroots organizing." They pinpoint a handful of think-tanks and non-profits that are responsible for the intellectual (to put it generously) grist that's served as the basis for everything from mosque protests to lawsuits to legislation to hate crimes, and follow the money, revealing that a huge lump of the funding—$42 million over nine years—comes from just seven sources.

I'll be diving into this a bit more deeply later, but for now I just wanted to highlight this map, which is an updated/spiffier version of the one I created way back when:

Courtesy of CAPCourtesy of CAP

Given the deep-seated religious tensions at play here, I think the Islamophobia movement goes a bit deeper than the report necessarily gives it credit for—plenty of pastors would be talking about "Clash of Civilizations" regardless of whether Frank Gaffney gets his check from the Richard Mellon Scaife Foundation. But this map, charting the mushrooming of nearly-identical bills to ban Islamic law from being applied in American courts, shows the power that a small but dedicated network—led, in this case, by Arizona attorney David Yerushalmi—can have.

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