Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

Reporter

Tim Murphy is a senior reporter in MoJo's DC bureau. His writing has been featured in Slate and the Washington Monthly. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy [at] motherjones [dot] com.

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Behind Herman Cain's Smokin' Ad: His Big Tobacco Days

As a restaurant industry lobbyist in the 1990s, the GOP presidential candidate went to bat for R.J. Reynolds.

| Tue Oct. 25, 2011 6:00 AM EDT
Herman Cain's campaign manager, Mark Block, stars in the 2011 art house flick, "Now is the time for action!"

This Herman Cain campaign ad, which was released last night, has gotten a lot of people wondering what Cain's been smoking. The Daily Beast's Michelle Goldberg calls Cain's smile at the end "the creepiest fucking thing I've ever seen." MoJo alum Suzy Khimm says Cain must be "clearly a devotee of Ryan Gosling in Drive, with that slooow smile at the end." Long-shot presidential candidate Buddy Roemer, who like the rest of the field is probably wondering why he is is trailing in the polls to Herman Cain, immediately contemplated filming a spoof.*

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Herman Cain's Wild West Campaign Spot

Whatever Herman Cain is smoking, he's been doing it for a while now.

| Tue Oct. 25, 2011 12:51 AM EDT

Everyone's talking about Herman Cain's bizarre ad, in which his campaign manager lights a cigarette and Cain flashes a moderately evil grin at the very end. Yes, it's weird. But by any objective metric, this Cain online ad from August, when he was polling at at 5 percent, is actually much, much weirder:

For that matter, this spot, in which Cain announced his candidacy by wandering around someone else's farm, looking lost, is also kind of weird: 

 

Tennessee Hotel "Now Under Shariah Law," Anti-Shariah Activist Says

Says an organizer: "The Hutton Hotel is now under Sharia law."

| Mon Oct. 24, 2011 5:26 PM EDT

If you didn't buy your plane tickets yet to November's Preserving America Conference in Nashville, you might want to wait a little while. The Veterans Day conference is dedicated to combatting the very, very stealth threat posed by Islamic Shariah law in the United States. But on Thursday, the hotel that was scheduled to host the shindig announced that it was cancelling the contract and asking organizers to find a new location. That's too bad, because Central Tennessee—where local activists (with some help from GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain) have been pushing to halt the construction of a mosque they believe is a front for the Muslim Brotherhood—seemed like a natural place for the conference. Per the Tennessean:

Steve Eckley, senior vice president of hotels for Amerimar Enterprises, said he wasn't fully aware of the topic or the people involved when he booked the event in Nashville, and now he fears that resulting protests could turn violent. As well, the hotel's other clients that day expressed concerns.

William Murray, chairman of the Preserving Freedom conference, responded: "The Hutton Hotel is now under Sharia law."

Devastating. Given that these kinds of events go off without incident all the time in the United States, it's hard to see why the hotel was so concerned about violent protests. As the Murray's reaction suggests, the only real consequence of the cancellation will be to further the organizers' perception that their views under siege, and the Caliphate is one step closer to being realized. Anyway, according to the conference's website, the event will be headlined by Center for Security Policy's Frank Gaffney (who believes Grover Norquist's American Conservative Union has been infilitrated by the Muslim Brotherhood), blogger Pamela Geller, former congressional candidate Lou Ann Zelenik, and—not making this up—"Gopher" from Love Boat:

What Will Michele Bachmann Do Next?

The Minnesota congresswoman's top post-presidential race job prospects.

| Mon Oct. 24, 2011 9:52 AM EDT
High five! Michele Bachmann celebrates in happier times.

At this point, a combeback seems pretty nigh impossible for Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.). On Friday, the GOP presidential candidate was informed during a radio interview that her entire New Hampshire campaign staff had quit. That came at the end of a week in which her former campaign manager, Ed Rollins, told National Review Online he wished he'd Googled her before he took the job, and the latest polls in Iowa put her at 4 percent—33 points behind front-runner Herman Cain, who had not visited the state in two months before this weekend.

You can blame Rick Perry for taking away Bachmann's momentum after the Ames Straw Poll, and Cain for ensuring she never got it back. But most of the blame must lie with Bachmann herself, who has run a bizarre celebrity-style campaign and done little to convince conservatives she's best prepared for the most powerful job in the world. Her first book comes out in November, so she'll likely stick it out until then at least, but given her weak finances, Bachmann's a good candidate for an early exit from the presidential race. For the Minnesota congresswoman, it's time to start thinking about what comes next.

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