Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

Reporter

Tim Murphy is a senior reporter in MoJo's DC bureau. His writing has been featured in Slate and the Washington Monthly. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy [at] motherjones [dot] com.

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#OccupyWallStreet—and Madison—Comes to Washington

| Thu Oct. 6, 2011 5:18 PM EDT
"To boost the economy, why not pay interns?" Why not? MoJo does it.

As Andy Kroll reported this morning, the three-week-old #OccupyWallStreet movement has risen out of many of the same grievances that sparked massive protests at the Wisconsin state capitol. In some cases, as I discovered on Thursday at a satellite demonstration in DC, it even includes the same group of people.

Chad Bucholtz drove to DC ("crammed in like sardine cans") along with 14 others from Wisconsin to attend the rally. A veteran of the union demonstrations in Madison last February, he sees the 99-percent movement as a direct continuation of those efforts. "I see a lot of similarities; in Madison it wasn't just Democrats, it was Democrats and Republicans—maybe former Republicans," said Bucholtz, a student at UW–Milwaukee. "It was both the left- and right-wing people that recognized that the corporate influence of Koch Industries was pretty much buying policies." He politely disagrees with skeptics who say the movement hasn't articulated any specific goals: "We need a constitutional amendment to clarify that money is not free speech," he says. "My opinion is that the root [of the problem] is money buying politics."

Carrie Scherpeltz of Madison, another veteran of the Wisconsin demonstrations, said she expected about 100 Wisconsinites were on there way to show their support. "We were a spark; I personally want to fan it." Her message: "De-rig our economy. They've been rigged in favor of corporatocracy and against the people."

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Chart of the Day: Crisis of Confidence

| Thu Oct. 6, 2011 9:35 AM EDT

Via Pew, this chart sort of speaks for itself. Support for the nation's biggest institutions (you can add in the media, if you want) have very steadily declined over the last four decades. When you add in a horrible economy, it's really no surprise why so many people have taken to the streets to protest over the last three years:

Courtesy of Pew ResearchCourtesy of Pew Research

Eric Cantor Aide Forms Super-PAC—Is He Angling for VP?

| Wed Oct. 5, 2011 1:25 PM EDT
Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) is getting his own super-PAC.

If you're a running for national office in 2012, there are a few things you need to do: 1.) Do not hire Mark Penn; 2.) Don't tell your base that they "don't have a heart" (they won't like it); 3.) Set up a nominally independent super-PAC—preferably with a longtime ally at the helm—dedicated to raising corporate cash and spending it on your behalf. Since 2009's Citizens United decision, independent super-PACs, which can raise unlimited sums and spend it as they please—provided they don't communicate with any candidate—are all but required for serious candidates. Rick Perry has two of them, for instance.

And now, National Journal's Chris Frates reports that House Majority Leader Eric Cantor has gotten in the game, too—paving the way for a spot on 2012 ticket:

The PAC will be run by Cantor's deputy chief of staff John Murray and would give Cantor a vehicle he could use to run for vice president, should the opportunity arise, said a source close to the majority leader's office, who asked not to be named because the source was not authorized to speak publicly. Murray's departure from Cantor's office is imminent, the source said.

Cantor was floated as a potential vice presidential pick in 2008, but one year later a McCain aide called those reports a "complete and total joke." He was briefly mentioned as 2012 presidential candidate (mainly because he was raising a lot of money), but shot down those rumors. He has not endorsed a candidate yet, although he had publicly urged Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) to run.

Cain on #OccupyWallStreet: Get a Job

| Wed Oct. 5, 2011 11:02 AM EDT
GOP Presidential candidate Herman Cain says poor people have only themselves to blame.

GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain was having a pretty good week. On Tuesday, three polls from Public Policy showed the businessman/gospel singer in the lead in North Carolina, Nebraska, and West Virginia. Another recent poll had Cain trailing only Mitt Romney in the key Florida primary. Then, on Wednesday, he put his foot squarely in his mouth in an interview with the Wall Street Journal. Here's what Cain said when asked about the #OccupyWallStreet movement:

I don't have facts to back this up, but I happen to believe that these demonstrations are planned and orchestrated to distract from the failed policies of the Obama administration. Don't blame Wall Street, don't blame the big banks, if you don't have a job and you're not rich, blame yourself! It is not someone’s fault if they succeeded.

Cain added that the banks "did have something to do with the crisis in 2008, but we're not in 2008, we're in 2011! Okay?"

To put it bluntly: Cain really doesn't have any facts to back him up. The protests were initially organized by Adbusters, which is hardly an organ of the Obama administration. As my colleague Andy Kroll reported this morning, organized labor has made a push to get behind the movement, but they're piggybacking on a movement that has already taken off.

This is not the first time Cain has found himself on the wrong side of facts. Citing debunked conspiracy theorists, he alleged that Islamic Sharia law was already being forced on American courts in Oklahoma and Texas (he meant Florida), and despite touting himself as a constitutionalist, argued that the First Amendment does not apply to the Muslims of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (Cain has since apologized, and then denied that he changed his position.)

Cain's not the only Republican candidate to weigh in on the #OccupyWallStreet: On Tuesday, Mitt Romney called the protests "dangerous" and "class warfare."

h/t Think Progress.

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