Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

Reporter

Tim Murphy is a reporter in MoJo's DC bureau. Last summer he logged 22,000 miles while blogging about his cross-country road trip for Mother Jones. His writing has been featured in Slate and the Washington Monthly. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy [at] motherjones [dot] com.

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Bryan Fischer, Basketball Analyst

| Wed Jan. 26, 2011 2:00 PM EST

American Family Association issues director Bryan Fischer is what we in the blogging business like to call a "generalist." In just the last year, he's called for the public stoning of a killer whale, labeled grizzly bears an existential threat to America, warned that the Congressional Medal of Honor has been "feminized," and suggested that all Muslims be deported. Take any topic, no matter how remote, and Fischer will manage to find a hidden message of impending doom.

Now, in what amounts to a stay of execution for America's wildlife, Fischer has broken his lengthy silence on the subject of Utah high school girls basketball. Last week, Christian Heritage Academy edged West Ridge (a school for at-risk youth), 108-3, prompting some folks to suggest, somewhat delicately, that a 105-point victory might be a little much. Bryan Fischer is not one of those people, and he has dedicated an entire column to making his case.

As Fischer explained, "If it's a choice between grizzlies and humans, the grizzlies have got to go" running up the score is the Christian thing to do. "[I]t's an insult to an opponent not to give your best effort just because you're sitting on a huge lead. Your opponents deserve the respect of facing the best you have to offer, and it's up to them to rise to the challenge." Christian Heritage, Fischer says, "should be praised not condemned."

So there you go: Bryan Fischer has weighed in. And now, back to your regularly scheduled programming about how anti-discrimination laws turn housing complexes into "hunting grounds" for gay people.

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Book Blogging: The States of Our Union Are Misspelled

| Tue Jan. 25, 2011 8:54 PM EST

Photo: Wikimedia CommonsPhoto: Wikimedia CommonsI recently picked up a copy of George R. Stewart's Names on the Land. It's a fascinating account of the naming of America: How we got places like Mugfuzzle Flats, Coeur d'Alene, and Fort Worth, and (to put it in unsufferable press release-ese) what that says about us.

Among other things, we learn that the Senate debate over the naming of West Virgina briefly devolved into a discussion of whether Queen Elizabeth was, in fact, a virgin. And that before Congress settled on "Nevada" (over the superior and geographically relevant "Washoe"), there was a proposal to name it "Bullion," after its only notable export.

The big revelation, though, is that despite all appearances to the contrary, "Oregon" is actually a misspelling of "Wisconsin." Or rather, it's a corruption of the original French corruption of the original Native American word. A somewhat erroneous 17th-century French explorer suggested that the Wisconsin River might lead all the way to the Pacific Ocean, so when the Americans finally got around to the Pacific Northwest, it seemed like a logical name. Here's the process, according to Stewart:

Wisconsin <— Ouisconsink —> Ouariconsint —> Ouaricon-sint —> Ouaricon —> Ourigan —> Ouragon —> Oregon

Simple enough, I guess. Anyways, this officially makes Oregon redundant. Perhaps Obama can address this in his State of the Union?*

*Update: No.

The Week in Sharia: Elvis Retreats, Texas Reloads

| Fri Jan. 21, 2011 6:37 PM EST

The new face of terror? (Photo: Governor's Office/Tim Larsen) The new face of terror? (Photo: Governor's Office/Tim Larsen)Let's get right to it:

  • New Jersey's sterling reputation is under attack! Republican Gov. Chris Christie, floated by some conservatives as a possible 2012 candidate, has become the unlikely target of the anti-Sharia fringe after appointing Sohail Mohammed, a known Muslim, to the state superior court. Right-wing blogger Pamela Geller summed things up nicely: "Governor Christie looked and sounded like he could be presidential. He's not. He's in bed with the enemy. All the other stuff doesn't matter if you don't have your freedom."
  • Also in bed with the enemy, apparently, is Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), whose upcoming hearings on the "radicalization" of the American Muslim community came under fire this week—from the right. Steve Emerson, of the totally legit-sounding Investigative Project on Terrorism, alleged that King had "caved in to the demands of radical Islamists" by neglecting to invite him to testify. I detailed King's own history of radicalism here.
  • Remember that whole to-do about the proposed Islamic community center in Manhattan? It turns out the entire anti-mosque advertising campaign was paid for by one (1) New York hedge-fund manager, Robert Mercer, possibly under the pretense of demonstrating to political power brokers that he was willing spend tons money if necessary, on the totally unrelated issue of high-frequency trading.
  • Texas is facing a $27 billion budget deficit, so naturally the state legislature is hard at working on the political equivalent of hitting "refresh" on your Facebook feed all day: State Rep. Leo Berman (author of his state's birther bill) has introduced legislation to ban Sharia law from being used in Texas courts. Far-right activists believe Sharia could subject citizens to extremely harsh punishments for dubious infractions—and isn't that what the state's criminal justice system is for?
  • Meanwhile, in Indiana, a similar proposal has been shelved—for the time being. State Rep. (and Elvis impersonator) Bruce Borders, who had previously floated the ban to send the message "that Indiana does not recognize Sharia law, or Muslim law," told the Terre Haute Tribune-Star, that he has not actually introduced any such legislation yet.
  • And finally, the Village Voice reports that the NYPD has been requiring its officers to watch a film called The Third Jihad as part of their counter-terrorism training. Per the Voice: "The favorite image in The Third Jihad—shown over and over—is an enormous black-and-white Islamic flag flying over the White House." At one point the narrator warns that "One of their primary tactics is deception." I mean, just look at Chris Christie.

Batman Submits to Sharia, Gotham Freaks Out

| Thu Jan. 6, 2011 2:20 PM EST

Image courtesy of DC ComicsImage courtesy of DC ComicsHelp us, Phoenix Jones! You're our only hope.

One day after conservative icon Grover Norquist was outed as a Jihadi stooge (the beard was a tipoff), AFP reports that the anti-sharia blogosphere is up in arms over the latest, greatest threat to Western Civilization: Bruce Wayne. Wait, what?

Per AFP:

In the December issues of DC Comics Detective Comics Annual and Batman Annual, the caped crusader has set up Batman Incorporated and wants to install a superhero in cities around the world to fight crime.*

The hero he picks in France is called Nightrunner, the alter ego of a 22-year-old from Clichy-sous-Bois, a tough Paris suburb where urban unrest sparked riots in immigrant districts across France in 2005.

Nightrunner, known to his family and tax collector as "Bilal Asselah," is an expert in parkour, which is awesome. He's also a Muslim who hails from Algeria, which seems to be what conservatives are really upset about. Big Hollywood's Warner Todd Huston, for instance, called the comic, "PCism at its worst." He added: "France is a proud nation. Yet DC Comics has made a foreigner the 'French savior.' This will not sit well with many Frenchmen, for sure."

For sure. Frenchmen (and Frenchwomen) would never embrace a Algerian Muslim as a national savior. But there's more:

US comic book creator Bosch Fawstin, who wrote on his blog that "DC Comics has submitted to Islam," is coming up with his own antidote.

"If you're as sick and tired of this IslamiCrap as I am, be on the lookout for my upcoming graphic novel, The Infidel, which features Pigman, an ex-Muslim superhero who is the jihadist's worst nightmare," he blogged.

Pigmen aside, I'd just add that Nightrunner's debut is actually the second Muslim superhero controversy in the last year: Last fall, the New York Post slammed President Obama for praising a cartoon featuring 99 Muslim  superheroes who each embody a virtue of Allah**. Looks like Captain Planet is finally off the hook.

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