2007 - %3, October

Giuliani Says Innocent Until Proven Guilty - Keeps Accused Priest As Consultant

| Wed Oct. 24, 2007 9:53 AM EDT

Presidential candidate Rudy Giuliani, despite some protests from the community, is retaining his longtime friend, Monsignor Alan Placa, as a consultant for his 2008 campaign. Placa, who officiated at Giuliana's second wedding, has been accused of sexually abusing two former students and an altar boy. He has been told by the church to discontinue performing his duties as a priest.

One of the people objecting to Giuliani's decision, an alleged victim of Placa's, says that Place abused him repeatedly in 1975 when he was a student at a boys' school on Long Island.

The candidate said of Placa: "I know the man; I know who he is, so I support him. We give some of the worst people in our society the presumption of innocence and benefit of the doubt. And, of course, I'm going to give that to one of my closest friends."

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It's a Mad, Mad, Mad World

| Wed Oct. 24, 2007 9:51 AM EDT

At the risk of becoming a dreaded aggregator, here are a few choice tidbits I couldn't help shaking my head at:

Belgian cops being politely asked to stop hitting the bars and brothels while on duty.

Technology's response to gropers gone wild on Tokyo's subways.

And, my fave: these lucky bastards dancing women around the world vs. this doomed one who found a huge, honking diamond while with his fiance and actually believes it's going in his collection since she already has one. Smart money says she'll either be wearing it by Thanksgiving or dis-engaged.

Noose Nuisance

| Wed Oct. 24, 2007 7:29 AM EDT

tupac.jpg

So now a noose around a Tupac Shakur statue. Yawn.

Where's that Yankee exceptionalism and entrepreneurial spirit y'all believe exists only in you? Get fresh, white people 'cuz we're starting to suspect that this tired act is pure attention getting. I got five bucks that says these geniuses have black friends and listen to hip hop. And Tupac Shakur?

Exactly which Negroes do you think will get fired up about that; most my age will harrumph, "That boy with the head scarf on and all them tattoos, so called 'rapping' 'bout nothin' but bitches and hoes? Well, they shouldn't a done it but that boy shoulda pulled his pants up on his behind." Y'all don't even know how to strike fear in our hearts anymore, the kind that made us abandon entire regions and neighborhoods in our own hometowns after dark. How sad when the Great White Man, flailing in his growing impotence, finds a way to make blacks put the noose in perspective: Noose, defending hip hop? Noose. Hip hop. Hmmm. What else is in the paper today? There's a reason why I'm only receiving outraged emails from sites like Thug Life Army and Allhiphop.com. My, how the mighty have fallen.

The only fun we get to have with morons like this is picturing these knuckle-draggers (it takes at least four such simians to work up the courage of an actual human) hitting wikipedia to figure out how to get a noose right. Dude. Was it over then under, or, like, around?

The statue was on the site of the Tupac Amaru Shakur Center For the Arts. The Arts. How about taking the time to remix Don Imus's comments with this guy's and set up a few speakers? What are you—lazy? Not too bright?

Or maybe just pointless, too lame to leverage the only thing you had going for you—skin privilege—into the windfall that it still is. If only you weren't so lazy and stupid. Ah, oh yeah: cowards.

First Minority Governor in Louisiana Knows How to Play by the Rules

| Tue Oct. 23, 2007 9:22 PM EDT

Bobby Jindal, a "son of Indian immigrants," made history as the first non-white governor of Louisiana since Reconstruction and the first ever Indian American governor. Throughout his campaign, though, Jindal downplayed his ethnicity.

This is common practice among minority politicians, claiming that their ethnicity is not really an issue—that hard work will get you anywhere in America, regardless of race, gender, education, and income— as they tell their parents' immigration story in the same breath. Jindal's victory speech reminded Louisiana citizens that his parents came to this country to pursue the American Dream. He added, "My parents have seen what I have seen, that in America and specifically in Louisiana -- the only barrier to success is your willingness to work hard and play by the rules."

Those rules apparently mean appealing to the conservative, Christian, and white voting base in Louisiana. Jindal supports "intelligent design" over evolution in public school education, is anti-abortion, and is looking to revoke hate crime laws.

While it is hard to deny the significance of Jindal's victory as a non-white in a state known for its contentious racial politics, it is less so considering his views pander to the conservative voting bloc.

—Neha Inamdar

Tuesday? Ensues Music News Day

| Tue Oct. 23, 2007 6:10 PM EDT

mojo-photo-news1023.jpg

  • Police in England shut down today what they called "the primary source worldwide" for illegal, prerelease music downloads. The invitation-only "OiNK" site turned out to be run by a 24-year-old dude in Middlesbrough, northeast England. Look, they caught the kid in his bathrobe:

    OiNK's servers in Amsterdam were shut down as well, but here's an OiNK memorial site if you're feeling sad.
  • Def Jam chairman Antonio "L.A." Reid confirmed his support for Nas after the rapper announced his new album would be called Nigger, saying "Anything Nas wants to do, I stand beside him." The Rev. Al Sharpton, on the other hand, condemned the choice, saying "We do not need to be degrading ourselves… we get degraded enough."
  • Lance Bass describes life in the closet during his years in 'NSYNC to MTV News, saying he had people close to him sign non-disclosure agreements, and that the band's management and publicists didn't advise him against coming out, because, he says, even they didn't know. Huh.
  • The BBC has been criticized for allowing a racist remark by Iggy Pop to go uncensored and unacknowledged during the network's live broadcast from Glastonbury in June. Pop told a story about visiting "Paki shops" in Camden, using a term that the BBC said has now passed out of "polite usage."
  • The End of the Infinite Internet?

    | Tue Oct. 23, 2007 5:30 PM EDT

    Everyone's favorite cable monopoly has been caught dabbling in some interesting political waters of late. Last week, the Federation of American Scientists, a group of scientists, engineers, and other technical professionals who research and comment on national policy issues, published a company handbook revealing that for the bargain price of $1,000, Comcast would happily intercept any and all of its customers' communications that the government requests through FISA.

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    Hillary: "Pay Attention To Your Hair"

    | Tue Oct. 23, 2007 5:23 PM EDT

    Bill-Hillary-1970-New-Hav.jpg

    So I was walking past "Blow," a new salon in the MoJo hood, when I spotted this quote, attributed to Hillary Clinton, taped on the door:

    I have to say that in all the years since I've been at Yale, the most important thing that I have to say today-is that hair matters. This is a life lesson my family did not teach me, Wellesley and Yale failed to instill on me: the importance of your hair. Your hair will send very important messages to those around you. It will tell people who you are and what you stand for. What hopes and dreams you have for the world…and especially what hopes and dreams you have for your hair. Likewise, your shoes. But really, more your hair. So, to sum up. Pay attention to your hair. Because everyone else will.

    And I thought: That can't be real. But it is.

    This isn't meant to be a slight on Hillary, btw. More just a sad commentary on the state of politics in America. More on how Hillary is judged on her looks here.

    CDs Out Today and a Word From Critics

    | Tue Oct. 23, 2007 4:58 PM EDT

    CoheedCoheed and Cambria
    No World For Tomorrow
    (Sony)
    Rolling Stone: "Impressive" (3.5/5 stars)
    Blender: "Blazing" (3.5/5 stars)



    DaveDave Gahan
    Hourglass
    (Mute)
    The Guardian: "Magnificence" (4/5 stars)
    Rolling Stone: "Depeche-sounding" (3/5 stars)



    mojo-cover-carrie.jpgCarrie Underwood
    Carnival Ride
    (Arista)
    Slant: "Cliché-addled" (2/5 stars)
    NY Times: "Clever" (no grade)



    mojo-cover-serj.jpgSerj Tankian
    Elect the Dead
    (Reprise)
    Billboard: "Arty" (no grade)
    AllMusic Guide: "Ambitious" (4/5 stars)

    Mitt Romney is Fictionally Handsome

    | Tue Oct. 23, 2007 2:55 PM EDT

    Re-reading Sridhar Pappu's 2005 article on Mitt Romney ("The Holy Cow Candidate"), I'm reminded of some similarities...

    romney_and_superheroes.jpg

    Thankfully, that only took me two and a half hours to create.

    Weird Weather Watch: Southern California Fires

    | Tue Oct. 23, 2007 2:44 PM EDT

    By now, you've probably heard that there's a really big wildfire in the San Diego area, and it's being fueled by the Santa Ana winds. It's the worst fire in four years—which is saying something in Southern California. Fire season is especially bad this year due to the erratic weather that's the hallmark of climate change: First, record rainfall produces lots of brush; then, a record drought turned it into so much kindling. Add the Santa Ana winds, and you've got a conflagration. 170,000 acres, to be exact.

    Almost 300,000 people have been asked to evacuate, and about 10,000 of them spent the night in Qualcomm stadium (formerly San Diego Stadium). Seems that as climate change progresses, more and more of us are going to be camping out in behemoth football stadiums. Their corporate sponsors are probably stoked.