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Writers' Strike Could Drive a Quarter of TV Watchers Away for Good

| Thu Dec. 27, 2007 3:09 PM PST

youtube100.jpgAs the writers' strike slogs on, TV pundits look to the past for answers—specifically, the last writers' strike in 1988. A blogger over at YouLicense has talked to a Writers' Guild official who claimed that after the last strike, 10 percent of TV watchers gave up the tube for good. There aren't many hard numbers to back up that claim, but some are saying that the decline in TV devotees will be even steeper this time around—and this time, there's a much more compelling reason—Internet TV:

Whichever way this strike plays out in the near future the real winner is the internet. There are hundreds of well funded online TV platforms like Joost , Babelgum, RayV, Knocka TV and many more ready to make their big move. Millions of viewers are emigrating to these newly launched platforms. Millions of viewers prefer watching 3 minute videos on YouTube and Metacafe over the traditional TV shows. The longer the strike continues, the more accustomed these viewers are to getting their fix online.

Some predict as many as 28 percent of viewers will switch to an Internet-only diet. We can only hope this means online TV will get better.

—Kiera Butler

Huxley's Brave New World Led to Bush's Stem Cell Decision

| Thu Dec. 27, 2007 2:29 PM PST

brave75.jpgA high school English class classic helped Bush make up his mind about stem cells, according to a former Bush adviser. From a Commentary Magazine piece called "Stem Cells and the President: An Inside Account" by Jay P. Lefkowitz, who worked as general counsel in the Office of Management and Budget under Bush:

A few days later, I brought into the Oval Office my copy of Brave New World, Aldous Huxley's 1932 anti-utopian novel, and as I read passages aloud imagining a future in which humans would be bred in hatcheries, a chill came over the room. "We're tinkering with the boundaries of life here," Bush said when I finished. "We're on the edge of a cliff. And if we take a step off the cliff, there's no going back. Perhaps we should only take one step at a time."

H/T Think Progress.

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Wal-Mart Sells Noncompliant Gas Cans...Again

| Thu Dec. 27, 2007 12:45 PM PST

walmart200.jpgWal-Mart's up to its old tricks. For the fourth time in the last few years, the company has been caught selling illegal gas cans in California. The cans, which leak hydrocarbons that create smog, have been outlawed for some time in the state. This time around, Wal-Mart paid about $250,000 for violating air quality laws.

Between 2003 and 2007, the company sold about 3,000 illegal cans. Funny, since it was during those same years that the biggest big box really pumped up the volume on its environmental PR efforts. So here's the question: How do we make sure that Wal-Mart walks its talk? Considering the fact that in 2005, the company reportedly made $20,000 a minute, it'll take a whole lot more than a $250,000 fine, that's for sure.

—Kiera Butler

Housewives Are Better Recyclers Than College Kids

| Thu Dec. 27, 2007 10:59 AM PST

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When one thinks about the demographics most likely to be great at recycling, college students spring immediately to mind. I mean, come on, they were made to separate out papers from plastics, what with their boundless reserves of idealism. And if they're not putting all that wide-eyed earnestness to good ecological use, what are they doing, anyway?

Lying around. According to a recent study, college students are actually less likely to recycle than housewives. The reason? Basically, sloth:

...the researcher points out that university students "have less control over glass recycling behaviour, given they perceive it as a series of barriers and limitations hard to overcome." The container being far from home and they having to make their way to it while carrying heavy bags full of glass, for example, is viewed as a difficulty for students, and not for housewives.

Okay, so the study was pretty small—only 525 students and 154 housewives participated. And the task on which participants were evaluated—separating glass from other trash—does not an ecologist make, to say the least. And maybe the fact that college students are lazy is not exactly a groundbreaking finding. But the main point that they researchers took away from this strange little study remains, nonetheless, an interesting one: Ecological awareness does not necessarily lead to action. In other words, just because someone considers herself an environmentalist, doesn't mean she's going to get off her butt and do something about it.

The next step: figuring out how to make environmental activism more compelling than, oh I don't know, stealing music off the Internet while pounding Bud Light. Or whatever.

—Kiera Butler