Blogs

McCain Camp Responds to "Houses" Situation... Hilariously

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 3:16 PM EDT

This is awesome or awful PR work. I'm not sure which. A collection of things McCain spokesman Brian Rogers told the Washington Post about the "How Many Houses?" scandal that is brewing:

On Obama's house:

"It's a frickin' mansion."

On the McCains' definitely-not-elitist housing habits:

"The reality is they have some investment properties and stuff. It's not as if he lives in ten houses. That's just not the case. The reality is they have four that actually could be considered houses they could use."

On how the McCain campaign apparently sees Obama:

"In terms of who's an elitist, I think people have made a judgment that John McCain is not an arugula-eating, pointy headed professor-type."

On something completely irrelevant:

"This is a guy who lived in one house for five and a half years — in prison."

A couple observations: (1) Isn't it weird how the McCain campaign simultaneously paints Obama as an effete nerd and a super-cool celebrity? (2) Noun-verb-POW!

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Howard Wolfson Contains Multitudes

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 3:00 PM EDT

Hillary Clinton's former top flack starts a music blog, of all things.

Of Suskind and Habbush

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 2:46 PM EDT

Earlier this month, journalist Ron Suskind published a book in which he explosively charged that the White House had directed the CIA to concoct a letter from former Iraqi intelligence chief Tahir Jalil Habbush alleging falsely that 9/11 lead hijacker Mohammad Atta had trained for his mission in Iraq. The bogus letter exists and was indeed passed by an Iraqi exile figure close to the CIA Ayad Allawi to journalist Con Coughlin who published it in the Sunday Telegraph; Newsweek quickly exposed the letter as phony. The White House described Suskind's claims as "absurd," and a CIA official quoted in Suskind's account, Rob Richer, has disputed Suskind's characterization of what happened, as has former CIA director George Tenet. Today, Dan Froomkin follows up at his washingtonpost.com column:

Someone is finally demanding some answers about author Ron Suskind's charge that the White House, seeking to justify its invasion of Iraq, ordered the CIA in late 2003 to forge documents linking Saddam Hussein to al Qaeda and nuclear imports from Niger.
It's not the press, however -- it's the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee.

Mia Farrow and Erik Prince Do Breakfast

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 1:27 PM EDT

2530892604_84639aa6e2.jpg

So, what do Mia Farrow and Erik Prince have in common? No, it's not a joke. The answer is nothing. Well, almost nothing. But according to ABC News, the aging starlet and the Blackwater founder breakfasted together in New York City last month. The subject of their discussion? Sending Blackwater operators to Darfur to train African Union soldiers and protect refugee camps. Farrow, a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and chair of Dream for Darfur, is (like everyone else) frustrated by the inability of African peacekeepers to protect refugees from the Janjaweed and believes Blackwater just might have what it takes to do the job right. "Blackwater has a much better idea of what an effective peace-keeping mission would look like than western governments," Farrow said.

Farrow has become an impassioned advocate for stopping the violence in Darfur at the same time that Blackwater, better known for its cowboy behavior in Iraq, appears to be attempting to reposition itself away from protecting diplomats and back to its original mission, the provision of military training. A reporter who knows both Prince and Farrow apparently put the odd couple in touch with each other by telephone, a contact that resulted in the New York breakfast.

More from ABC News after the break...

Obama Goes on the Air With McCain's Houses

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 12:36 PM EDT

The Obama campaign has the quickest video team on these here internets. It already has an ad up on what is quickly becoming my new favorite story.

I know they had to keep it simple, but I would have tried to work in this point. Take a look at the spending habits of the McCains ("Cindy McCain charged as much as $500,000 in a single month on one American Express card and $250,000 on another") and the fact that they have so many million-dollar homes that John McCain can't even remember them all. And then consider the fact that wasteful spending is supposedly John McCain's animating passion.

I view this as a more serious hypocrisy that John Edwards' zip code-sized house. And we all know how long that story hung around.

Update: Another point Obama's team could have made: how can someone oversee the housing crisis when he doesn't have any day-to-day concerns about his own mortgage? Or mortgages, as the case may be? How can this person set tax rates for the middle class? All of that is implied, I suppose...

Obvious Policy Suggestion for Barack Obama

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 12:18 PM EDT

Propose using John McCain's myriad properties to address the housing crisis.

How many Americans who have lost their homes to foreclosure can fit on a ranch with four addresses and six houses? I'm guessing a fair amount. We could make it a TV show! What happens when a bunch of pissed off voters stop being polite and start getting real?

Advertise on MotherJones.com

It's Easy to Get Confused By John McCain's Houses

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 11:50 AM EDT

Look, I can understand why John McCain has trouble counting his houses. Are we talking properties? Addresses? Homes? Because when you have a massive ranch with a half dozen homes and four addresses on it, things get confusing.

From a press report on the barbecue McCain threw for the members of the media (no, Mother Jones was not invited) in March:

McCain said... the Hidden Valley Ranch [in Arizona] got its name from the horseshoe shape of the creek that runs through the property.
He said he built the first house on his property 24 years ago and now there are six houses on his lot.

The addresses on the ranch are 11455 E Hidden Valley Road, 11445 E Hidden Valley Road, 11415 E Hidden Valley Road, and 11405 E Hidden Valley Road. I'm going to go ahead and assume that's a sizable ranch.

Here's the closest to a full account of the McCains' properties that I can find. It's from the Politico story that revealed exactly how extravagant the McCains' spending is ("Their credit card bills peaked between January 2007 and May 2008, during which time Cindy McCain charged as much as $500,000 in a single month on one American Express card and $250,000 on another"):

Clinton "Whip Team" Organized to Slay PUMAs

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 11:32 AM EDT

Clinton supporters hoping to agitate at the convention (starting Monday!) will face some friendly fire.

In an unusual move, Hillary Clinton's staff is creating a 40-member "whip team" at the Denver Democratic convention to ensure that her supporters don't engage in embarrassing anti-Obama demonstrations during the floor vote on her nomination, according to people familiar with the planning.
The team, which is being organized by longtime Clinton staffer Craig Smith, is working in conjunction with Obama's floor organizers to help foster the image of a unified front during a roll-call process Clinton herself has described as an emotional "catharsis" for her disappointed supporters.

This part isn't so helpful: "Clinton spokesperson Kathleen Strand emphasized the team would not seek to convince delegates to vote for the former first lady, but would hand out Clinton signs to supporters who requested them." [Emphasis mine.]

John McCain Does Not Know How Many Houses He Owns. This Is Not a Joke

| Thu Aug. 21, 2008 9:55 AM EDT

A fall full of moments like these will be entertaining. You have to wonder if there is video.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said in an interview Wednesday that he was uncertain how many houses he and his wife, Cindy, own.
"I think — I'll have my staff get to you," McCain told Politico in Las Cruces, N.M. "It's condominiums where — I'll have them get to you."
The correct answer is at least four, located in Arizona, California and Virginia, according to his staff. Newsweek estimated this summer that the couple owns at least seven properties.

The McCain family has proved to be out of touch before. These aren't harmless little gotcha moments. This sort of thing is a threat to your pocketbook.

Murakami's Running Lags Behind

| Wed Aug. 20, 2008 8:51 PM EDT

images.jpeg

I can't tell you how excited I was to read Haruki Murakami's new memoir, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. As a runner and admirer of Murakami's work, I raced to the bookstore in hopes of discovering thrilling personal connections between myself and the great novelist.

Unfortunately, what aspects I could relate to— the pain of training for a marathon; the feeling of running outside in the wet New England fall—were eclipsed by a parade of high-school-gym-class-style clichés ("Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional."). Even more disappointing was the pace and style of the book: The rambling trains of thought did not arrive at interesting destinations, and despite Murakami's claim to months of careful editing, the collection is about as organized and well thought out as your average LiveJournal entry.

And that's what this book seems to be—not a memoir or an essay collection so much as Murakami's personal blog, printed out and placed between two hard covers. And no matter who keeps them, personal blogs are ultimately records of the quotidian. Even giving Murakami the benefit of the doubt—perhaps his hackneyed phrases are much more beautiful in the original Japanese—the book cycles again and again through the kinds of small revelations that I have on every run. Running is hard. Running is like writing. These are not insignificant, but neither are they worth $21.