Iran's powers that be are not very good at Photoshop:This is a pretty obvious Photoshop fail. Begun, the clone war has. (h/t BoingBoing)

The New York Times reports today that National Security Agency "monitoring" of domestic email messages is "broader than previously acknowledged" and the agency is still examining "large volumes of Americans’ e-mail messages without court warrants." The fact that this kind of thing is no longer surprising is a sad commentary on the state of the Fourth Amendment.

As a rule, people don’t boo Barack Obama, the first rock star president. But on Monday, that’s exactly what happened. On a charm offensive in support of his health care reform efforts, Obama addressed the American Medical Association, the nation’s largest physician lobby. The doctors in the audience booed him for revealing that he didn’t support the group’s pet cause—caps on damages in medical malpractice lawsuits. Nonetheless, he did win some applause by adopting the doctors’ language and referring to the “defensive medicine” that is supposedly driving up health care costs.

In a carefully parsed speech, he said, “Some doctors may feel the need to order more tests and treatments to avoid being legally vulnerable. That’s a real issue. And while I’m not advocating caps on malpractice awards which I believe can be unfair to people who’ve been wrongfully harmed, I do think we need to explore a range of ideas about how to put patient safety first, let doctors focus on practicing medicine, and encourage broader use of evidence-based guidelines. That’s how we can scale back the excessive defensive medicine reinforcing our current system of more treatment rather than better care.”

It was a cagey move. In throwing the docs a bone, Obama embraced one of their most cherished arguments: that “defensive medicine” is driving up health care costs. But this bone doesn’t have much meat on it. Defensive medicine is doctors’ favorite anti-lawsuit argument. It goes something like this: The mere threat of malpractice lawsuits drives physicians to overprescribe expensive tests and procedures, ergo, making it harder for malpractice victims to sue would bring down health care costs. 

A quick round up of quick MoJo reads:

Those meddling kids at the State department asked Twitter to postpone the Fail Whale's Tehran cameo; Wall Street breathed a sigh of relief; and this week's adorably endangered animal is the Hawaiian monk seal.

Meanwhile, Blackwater lost a federal-issue fryer (and $55 million), health care reform is feeling a bit faint, and Chastity Bono's sex change = shrug.

And the question of the day: Are there any senators whose Tweets aren't cringeworthy? This guy, not so much.

Stories on health, the environment, and science from our other blogs you might have missed yesterday:

Pay more, get less: Only about 1/5 of charter schools perform better than public schools.

Death and taxes: Musings on the taxes necessary for universal healthcare.

Grassley's tweets: A translation of tweets by 75-year-old senator Chuck Grassley.

Palin's pain: While Palin is complaining, real women are actually being raped in Africa.

Obama's 1st climate report: Press nearly wets itself in excitement.

Those meddling kids at the State department asked Twitter to postpone the Fail Whale's Tehran cameo; Wall Street breathed a sigh of relief; and this week's adorably endangered animal is the Hawaiian monk seal.

Meanwhile, Blackwater lost a federal-issue fryer (and $55 million), health care reform is feeling a bit faint, and Chastity Bono's sex change = shrug.

And the question of the day: Are there any senators whose Tweets aren't cringeworthy? This guy, not so much.

Still Listening

James Risen and Eric Lichtblau report today that Congress is once again becoming concerned that the NSA is intercepting domestic email messages without a warrant:

Supporting that conclusion is the account of a former N.S.A. analyst who, in a series of interviews, described being trained in 2005 for a program in which the agency routinely examined large volumes of Americans’ e-mail messages without court warrants. Two intelligence officials confirmed that the program was still in operation.

....He said he and other analysts were trained to use a secret database, code-named Pinwale, in 2005 that archived foreign and domestic e-mail messages. He said Pinwale allowed N.S.A. analysts to read large volumes of e-mail messages to and from Americans as long as they fell within certain limits — no more than 30 percent of any database search, he recalled being told — and Americans were not explicitly singled out in the searches.

There's also this:

The N.S.A. is believed to have gone beyond legal boundaries designed to protect Americans in about 8 to 10 separate court orders issued by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, according to three intelligence officials who spoke anonymously because disclosing such information is illegal. Because each court order could single out hundreds or even thousands of phone numbers or e-mail addresses, the number of individual communications that were improperly collected could number in the millions, officials said.

....Overcollection on that scale could lead to a significant number of privacy invasions of American citizens, officials acknowledge, setting off the concerns among lawmakers and on the secret FISA court. “The court was not happy” when it learned of the overcollection, said an administration official involved in the matter.

Rep. Rush Holt (D–NJ), chairman of the House Select Intelligence Oversight Panel is investigating.  "Some actions are so flagrant that they can't be accidental," he says.

Chart of the Day

Josh Harkinson says the big new climate report released today by the Obama administration is no big deal because it's largely the same as the draft report that was released by the Bush administration last year.  Technically, maybe that's true.  But even though the report won't directly affect either legislation or agency rulemaking, surely it matters that we have an administration that actively and willingly releases a comprehensive report like this rather than one that fumes and delays and denies for four years before finally being forced to make it public with about the same enthusiasm that most of us reserve for getting a root canal?

Besides, even though it's primarily a review of existing literature, it's a pretty good review, covering everything from wildfires to rainfall to hurricanes to the fact that Illinois will look like Texas by 2100 (that's on p. 117).  Having a report this good, this comprehensive, and this authoritative may not save the planet, but it's still a pretty worthwhile data source to have around.

What's more, it's a gold mine of colorful charts!  And you know I'm a sucker for that kind of stuff. So here's your chart of the day: a 15-year history of electrical grid problems caused by increasingly extreme weather.  That's a new one on me, so maybe it's a new for you too.  The full report is here.

UPDATE: I picked this chart sort of randomly just because I'd never seen anything like it before.  Turns out there was a good reason for this: the increase in electrical grid problems is mostly the result of better reporting, not climate change.  Sorry about that.  Details here from Warren Meyer.

UPDATE 2: Evan Mills, who created this chart, emails to respond to Meyer's criticism.  He points out that (1) the caption specifically says this data doesn't demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship, (2) the growth in weather-related incidents is not merely an artifact of better data collection, and (3) there was a larger increase in warm weather incidents than cold weather incidents.  However, regardless of whether climate change has caused any of the recent increase in grid disturbances, the data does show what may be in store for us in the future if climate change continues.  More here.

Does the Waxman-Markey energy bill really give away 85% of its emission permits to big polluters?  Dave Roberts says no: most of the permit allocations go to consumers, households, and green energy programs.  Only about 22% of the permits go to big industrials.  That's still about 22% too high, but it's a lot less than most press reports would lead you to believe.  Details here.