In a world where post-grunge bands sell Snuggies, people prance around the beach in Wearable Towels, and mop up battered faces with ShamWows, we have to ask: Where will all these products be when our fickle-consumer preferences take a turn? You don't have to be a Freegan to come up with the answer.

3.5 Floppy Disc

Then: 1998 was the heyday of the cheerfully colored floppy disk. More than 2 billion were sold worldwide.

Now: External drives and CDs have usurped the 3.5. In 2007, PC World stopped selling the disks, and now the only place you can find a 3.5 drive is on Mother Jones intern computers.

Neither Gone Nor Forgotten: Turn boxes of old disks into handbags, pen holders, coasters, or spacey, Cubist artwork.


Then: Invented in 1949 for the New York City Jewish Hospital, beepers didn't achieve popularity until 1974 with the release of Motorola's Pageboy. Popularized by doctors, drug dealers, and pimps, 61 million pagers were beeping in the U.S. in 1994.

Now: The cellular telephone killed the pager. In 2008, four billion cell phones were in use worldwide, connecting more than 60% of the world population to American Idol ringtones and creating fodder for the Texts From Last Night.

Neither Gone Nor Forgotten: Beepers still buzz for emergency personnel and doctors . In Britian, pages are popular with "twitchers," who pay for up-to-the-minute tips on where to spot rare birds.





Nearly a year ago (June 3, 2008) in Minneapolis Denver, Illinois junior senator Barack Obama captured the Democratic nomination for president of the United States of America. Obama celebrated the event by bumping knuckles with his wife, a brief physical gesture whose public discussion would quickly become overwhelming. Well, it's time to celebrate that gesture again: next Wednesday, June 3, will be National Fist Bump Day. According to organizers of the event:

A group of like-minded people have gotten together to commemorate Obama's grand gesture, but also to take the fist bump to a higher level, one above partisan politics and social divides. For one day we are calling for Americans, and perhaps even all global citizens, to put aside their differences -- be they class, race, religion or values -- and show their respect with a little bump.


Recently, Harvard students protested the university's decision to stop offering anonymous HIV testing. According to the Harvard Crimson, the students staged their demonstration with  signs bearing slogans like "My right to privacy includes my right to anonymity."

But the signs were Plan B. Plan A would have been really cool:

Protestors had originally planned to request HIV tests en masse in order to demonstrate the demand for anonymous testing. But a majority of protesters were turned away by UHS because they did not have an appointment or an actual medical ailment, according to Craig B. Colbeck, a Graduate School of Arts and Sciences student.

It's a great idea—and we know today's students activists have plenty more where that one came from. MoJo, Campus Progress, and WireTap would like to hear about all feats of student activism (the more creative the better) from the past school year in time for the Hellraisers, our first annual student activism awards.

Here's how it works: You tell us about your favorite activism antics. Selected nominees will be featured in the September/October 2009 issue of Mother Jones.

Anyone can nominate any current student activists (and we're not just talking college here! High schoolers, grad students, kindergartners—all okay).

Nominating is quick and easy. Do it here.

On October 2, 1998, the full Senate voted on Sonia Sotomayor's nomination to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals and confirmed her nomination 67-29; all of the nay votes came from Republicans. That's not much of a surprise.

But just a few months earlier, in March 1998, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted 16-2 in favor of Sotomayor's nomination, with only Jon Kyl and John Ashcroft, both Republicans, voting against her. The Republican committee members who voted for Sotomayor included Strom Thurmond, Orrin Hatch and Jeff Sessions, but each of whom flipped his vote when Sotomayor's nomination went to the full Senate. (And when President George H.W. Bush nominated her for an open distict court spot in 1992, the Judiciary Committee—then chaired by Joe Biden—and the full Senate unanimously approved her nomination.)

So what happened between March and October 1998?

Republican senators have been blocking Judge Sotomayor's elevation to the appeals court for a highly unusual reason: to make her less likely to be picked by Mr. Clinton for the Supreme Court, senior Republican Congressional aides said in interviews.


Senate Republican staff aides said Trent Lott of Mississippi, the majority leader, has agreed to hold up a vote on the nomination as part of an elaborate political calculus; if she were easily confirmed to the appeals court, they said, that would put her in a position to be named to the Supreme Court. And Senate Republicans think that they would then have a difficult time opposing a Hispanic woman who had just been confirmed by the full Senate.

In other words, politics happened.

The Financial Times reports environmentalists and other politicos are up in arms over French President Nicolas Sarkozy's desire to appoint geochemist Claude Allegre—a denier of man-made climate change who called Al Gore's Nobel Prize a "political gimmick"—to France's new "super-ministry" of industry and innovation:

Mr Sarkozy wants to bring Mr Allègre, 72, a freethinking, former socialist education minister, into the government in a reshuffle after next month's European parliamentary elections. The president appears to reckon that appointing someone from outside his own centre-right party will help to counter perceptions that he is a polarising, sectarian leader who decides everything himself. Several portfolios are already held by figures from the left and centre.

Alain Juppé, the former centre-right prime minister, said the appointment would send a "terribly bad signal" ahead of international negotiations to secure a successor to the Kyoto treaty on cuts to carbon emissions.

Emphasis mine. I can understand Sarkozy wanting to look like he doesn't eschew a range of viewpoints, but this is a bit like appointing Richard Dawkins to an office of faith-based initiatives. It also doesn't help that Juppé, a member of Sarkozy's own party, thinks it's a stupid way to present yourself as an open-minded leader.

Arthur Dong's documentary on depictions of Chinese people onscreen, “Hollywood Chinese,” will be on PBS tonight as part of the American Masters series. I saw this film last year when it made the festival circuit and enjoyed it, despite having little familiarity with Chinese culture. It had some hilariously outdated film moments, everything from Fu Manchu 'staches to John Wayne in yellowface, plus celebs like Amy Tan and Ang Lee talking about how their heritage has impacted them personally and professionally in Hollywood. Definitely worth a watch, or at least a DVR. You can read my interview with Dong here.

Conservative blogger and columnist Rod Dreher was initially bothered by Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor's comment that she "would hope that a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life."

Then he read the context.

Dreher and other conservatives had been aghast at those 30-odd words ever since Stuart Taylor, Jr. pointed to them in a National Journal column over the weekend. At issue is the accusation that Sotomayor is, in Rush Limbaugh's words, "a reverse racist" who thinks that Latina judges have some special insight that they can and should use that makes them better than white male judges.

Sotomayor, who said those words in a speech at the University of California, Berkeley, in 2001, was actually making a very different point. Sotomayor said that, "Whether born from experience or inherent physiological or cultural differences... our gender and national origins may and will make a difference in our judging." She hoped that, in cases about "race and sex discrimination," a wise Latina's background and experiences might help her produce a better result than a white man who "hasn't lived that life." In context, it's clear Sotomayor is simply acknowledging that personal experiences inevitably affect judges' outlooks and hoping that they affect judges' decisions for the better. Having read the whole speech, Dreher explains what the broader point was:

Bob Somerby reads two front-page profiles of Sonia Sotomayor and reports back:

In the Times, Sotomayor is a person who is also Hispanic. In the Post’s formal profile, Sotomayor’s ethnicity is the headlined focus. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Goldstein’s focus on ethnicity features a peculiarly trivial, unflattering selection of anecdotes and recollections.

Meanwhile, via Steve Benen, I see that immigration zealot Mark Krikorian is fighting the good fight against pronouncing her name correctly:

So, are we supposed to use the Spanish pronunciation, so-toe-my-OR, or the natural English pronunciation, SO-tuh-my-er, like Niedermeyer? [Following up the next day:] Deferring to people's own pronunciation of their names should obviously be our first inclination, but there ought to be limits. Putting the emphasis on the final syllable of Sotomayor is unnatural in English [...] and insisting on an unnatural pronunciation is something we shouldn't be giving in to.

You know, I'm lousy at pronoucing non-English words.  If you want a nicely rolled R, look elsewhere.  But so-toe-my-OR?  Give me a break.  A five-year-old can do that.  Just like we all got used to pronouncing the president's name ba-ROCK.

This is going to be a long couple of months.

Alex Berenson is a New York Times reporter by day, bestselling spy novelist by night. Earlier this year, he published his third novel, The Silent Man, featuring his super spy John Wells. I came across the book at the library a couple of weeks ago and discovered that not only is it pretty good, but it's the rare spy novel for media junkies. At one point in the book, Wells assumes the cover of a Lebanese businessman/freedom fighter. To get into character, he tans at Solar Planet, dyes his hair and ODs on fried chicken. Fat and swarthy, Wells procures a fake passport to travel to Moscow to avenge an attack that nearly killed his girlfriend. His alias? Glenn Kramon, which also happens to be the name of Berenson's boss and managing editor of the Times.

I asked the real Kramon whether he knew Berenson had inserted him into the novel. Turns out he's a big fan of Berenson's novels and has read all three. When he first discovered his name in the most recent, Kramon says he "thanked Alex for not making me the villain." Kramon's is not the first name Berenson has appropriated from his Times colleagues. Kramon says his favorite is that of the book's hapless American ambassador to Russia, Walt Purdy, whose name he suspects is a hybrid of investigative reporter Walt Bogdanich and his editor, Matt Purdy. Naturally, the Times names had me wondering who else had popped up in Berenson's novels. Perhaps there's a Maureen Dowd cameo? Alas, Berenson says no. He only poaches names from people he knows, and he's never met Dowd. "I have a hunch that Wells wouldn't like her much, though," he says. "She's not his type."

McAllen and El Paso are very similar places: similar people, similiar diets, similar health profiles, both border towns only a few hundred miles apart from each other.  But healthcare costs in McAllen are almost twice what they are in El Paso.  What could possibly account for that?  Atul Gawande visited McAllen to find out, and ended up getting multiple answers from a group of doctors he went to dinner with one night.  Finally he got to the bottom of it:

“Come on,” the general surgeon finally said. “We all know these arguments are bullshit. There is overutilization here, pure and simple.” Doctors, he said, were racking up charges with extra tests, services, and procedures.

The surgeon came to McAllen in the mid-nineties, and since then, he said, “the way to practice medicine has changed completely. Before, it was about how to do a good job. Now it is about ‘How much will you benefit?’ ”

....The Medicare payment data provided the most detail. Between 2001 and 2005, critically ill Medicare patients received almost fifty per cent more specialist visits in McAllen than in El Paso, and were two-thirds more likely to see ten or more specialists in a six-month period....They also received two to three times as many pacemakers, implantable defibrillators, cardiac-bypass operations, carotid endarterectomies, and coronary-artery stents. And Medicare paid for five times as many home-nurse visits. The primary cause of McAllen’s extreme costs was, very simply, the across-the-board overuse of medicine.

....“In El Paso, if you took a random doctor and looked at his tax returns eighty-five per cent of his income would come from the usual practice of medicine,” [a hospital administrator] said. But in McAllen, the administrator thought, that percentage would be a lot less.

He knew of doctors who owned strip malls, orange groves, apartment complexes — or imaging centers, surgery centers, or another part of the hospital they directed patients to. They had “entrepreneurial spirit,” he said.

....About fifteen years ago, it seems, something began to change in McAllen. A few leaders of local institutions took profit growth to be a legitimate ethic in the practice of medicine. Not all the doctors accepted this. But they failed to discourage those who did. So here, along the banks of the Rio Grande, in the Square Dance Capital of the World, a medical community came to treat patients the way subprime-mortgage lenders treated home buyers: as profit centers.

This comes via Ezra Klein, who didn't excerpt anything from the piece because he wanted to encourage everyone to click on the link and read the whole thing.  Obviously I'm not quite so high-minded myself.  Plus there's the fact that I have a dim view of human nature: most of you guys aren't going to click the link no matter how much I tell you to, are you?

But you should!  It really is a good piece.  "Overutilization" is a boring buzzword that Gawande breathes real life into.  If you want to know why American medicine should look more like the Mayo Clinic — and why it would be both better and cheaper if it did — turn off the House reruns and read Gawande instead.  And if you want a different perspective on the same issue, try reading Shannon Brownlee's Overtreated.  It's good too.

(OK, fine, keep watching House.  It's a great show.  Just don't use it as your template for what medical care should look like, OK?)