Blogs

Ike Turner Dies at 76

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 7:11 PM EST

There's really no better way to put it than the AP opener:

Ike Turner, whose role as one of rock's critical architects was overshadowed by his ogrelike image as the man who brutally abused former wife Tina Turner, died Wednesday at his home in suburban San Diego. He was 76.

Ike Turner was involved in a record that some historians call the first, or one of the first, true rock songs: "Rocket 88", by Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats. Turner used a distorted sound on the guitar, something that reportedly happened by accident when one of the guitar amps fell over. If that's true, what an accident, right? But of course, he was a real jerk to Tina, and you can't help but think about Laurence Fishburne's harrowing portrayal of the guy in "What's Love Got to Do With It." While Turner always denied abusing his wife, I think everybody believes Tina on that score, and jeez, who doesn't love Tina Turner, it's like beating up the Statue of Liberty. So, rest in peace.

Here's Ike and Tina doing "Proud Mary."

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Tibetan Ice Cores Missing A-Bomb Markers

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 7:04 PM EST

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Ice cores drilled last year from the summit of a Himalayan ice field lack the distinctive radioactive signals that mark virtually every other ice core retrieved worldwide. That radioactivity originated as fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests during the 1950s and 1960s. These markers routinely provide researchers with benchmarks to gauge new ice accumulation. Scientists with Ohio State University's Byrd Polar Research Center believe the missing signal means the Naimona'nyi ice field has been shrinking at least since the A-bomb test half a century ago—foreshadowing serious water shortages in the future for more than 500 million people on the Indian subcontinent.

Meanwhile, the Bush administration continues to hamstring the Climate Change Conference in Bali, resisting emissions cuts. Doesn't this qualify as some sort of peace crime?

Julia Whitty is Mother Jones' environmental correspondent. You can read from her new book, The Fragile Edge, and other writings, here.

Arctic Waters Warm Alarmingly, Delaying Winter

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 6:36 PM EST

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We're hearing about the record-breaking iceless summer of 2007 in the Arctic, worse even than it first seemed. Now we're learning that these ice-free waters have deprived the Arctic of much of its natural insulation, enabling sea surface temperatures to rise 5-degrees C above average in one place this year—a high never before observed, says Michael Steele, oceanographer with the University of Washington's Applied Physics Laboratory.

Superwarming surface waters affect how thick ice grows back in the winter, as well as its ability to withstand melting the next summer. Already this year the winter freeze-up in some areas is two months later than usual, boding poorly for next summer. The ocean warming might also be contributing to changes on land, including novel plant growth in the coastal Arctic tundra.

Steele is lead author of "Arctic Ocean surface warming trends over the past 100 years," accepted for publication in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Research Letters.

Julia Whitty is Mother Jones' environmental correspondent. You can read from her new book, The Fragile Edge, and other writings, here.

New Music: Lupe Fiasco - The Cool

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 6:29 PM EST

mojo-photo-lupethecool.JPGI know I said lead single "Superstar" was good, and I stand by that, but the rest of Chicago rapper Lupe Fiasco' new album is, sadly, kind of disappointing. Apparently it's a concept album featuring three competing metaphorical characters, "The Cool" vs. "The Streets" vs. "The Game," but I'm afraid I have a hard time telling them apart or seeing how their braggadocio is any different from typical lowest-common-denominator hip-hop. Now and again we get some interesting tracks: see "Go Go Gadget Flow," where Fiasco gives us a technically skillful if oddly robotic double-time rap, or the Gemstones-featuring "Dumb It Down" with its dramatic, buzzy electro groove. But what's with the terrible intro poetry slam: "He thought it was cool to carry a gun in his classroom and open fire Virginia Tech Columbine stop the violence." What? And the track featuring UK producer UNKLE, "Hello/Goodbye (Uncool)," just ends up sounding like a Linkin Park B-side, possibly in a nod to Linkin Park's own Mike Shinoda who helped produce the album, in another bad sign.

Fiasco's 2006 album Food & Liquor was a progressive, Kanye West-influenced treat, but on The Cool, even when Fiasco delivers thoughtful lyrics and innovative flows, he's too often let down by the music.

Lupe Fiasco's The Cool is out next Tuesday, December 18th on Atlantic Records, but MTV.com is streaming the whole album here.

Mike Huckabee: "Don't Look All That Closely"

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 6:12 PM EST

This is just delightful.

"Not a crook or a weirdo or a Mormon." Good enough to win this field!

At GOP Debate, No Faith-Based Smackdown--and No Winner or Loser

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 5:11 PM EST

Okay, so there was no theological smackdown at the GOP presidential debate this afternoon in Iowa. This face-off was probably the most stilted event of the campaign so far. The questions from Carolyn Washburn, the editor of the Des Moines Register were mostly predictable and rarely probing. (In thirty seconds, state how would you better American education.) Consequently, not much happened.

There were no fireworks. No candidate went after another. (In one humorous aside, Fred Thompson said to Mitt Romney that he was getting pretty good at Thompson's own trade: acting.) The sniping over religion that had erupted between Mike Huckabee and Mitt Romney was not continued. Washburn did not ask Huckabee about a widely noted remark he made asking if Mormons believe Jesus and Satan were brothers. Rudy Giuliani may have only referred to 9/11 once. (A record?) Romney looked grand and smooth and spoke eloquently about education accomplishments in Massachusetts when he was governor of the state; John McCain touted his years of service and involvement in national security matters, and looked old. Huckabee explained that his faith caused him to believe that all citizens deserve access to good health care and decent education. No one won; no one lost.

That may be good news for Huckabee. Though he has jumped into the lead in Iowa, no one was gunning for him (except fringe candidate Alan Keyes, who inexplicably had been invited to participate in the debate). So Huckabee pranced through the encounter no worse for the wear. And Romney, the previous leader in the Hawkeye State, remains within striking distance of Huckabee.

There were only a few interesting moments in the 90-minute-long session. Two involved Thompson. When Washburn asked the candidates to raise their hands if they believed human-induced global warming is a threat Thompson said he wasn't going to engage in any "hand-shows." The rest of the pack followed suit. Thompson declared he would only answer the question if given a minute to do so. Given that Thompson in a radio commentary last March mocked people concerned with global warming and made comments suggesting he was a global warming denier, his refusal to agree with this basic statement was suspicious.

Then when the subject of the debate turned to the recent National Intelligence Estimate on Iran that reported Iran in 2003 discontinued a secret nuclear weapons program, Thompson indicated that he didn't accept the NIE and said that a U.S. president ought to rely more on British or Israeli intelligence then the U.S. intelligence community. A "president cannot let a piece of paper by a bureaucrat determine solely what his action is going to be," Thompson insisted. But that was a rather inaccurate description of an NIE. Such a document is not a report dashed off by one bureaucrat; it is the consensus document of the intelligence establishment, which is made up of sixteen different agencies. It can be wrong (as was the sloppy and hastily-compiled NIE on Iraq's WMDs). But Thompson's eagerness to belittle the intelligence system of the government he seeks to head might be considered troubling by voters looking for a president who will resist the I-know-best urge when deciding national security policy. But with Thompson's campaign sputtering, his skepticism toward the Iran NIE and global warming is not a pressing matter.

Minutes after the debate ended, a Thompson campaign email landed in reporters' inboxes that slammed Romney for helping to create a health care program in Massachusetts that covers abortions for a small copayment. The subject head: "Romney -- $50 Abortions in Massachusetts." The Thompson campaign is probably hoping for some viral action on this missive.

This email was a reminder. Though the candidates played nice on the stage during the debate, they still have plenty of time to throw muddy iceballs at each other before Iowa caucus goers gather on January 3.

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How Bad Do You Want It? 82nd Airborne Takes New Approach to Fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 4:58 PM EST

In the Nawa district of southern Afghanistan's Ghazni Province, villagers are so poor that they cannot clothe themselves in the winter. Their children are so sick that in the best case scenario, they are merely blind. And every time the struggling government tries to help them by supplying blankets, notebooks, or medical supplies, the Taliban emerges and yanks that aid away.

In remote regions such as these, the Taliban retains both unfettered power and a determination to fight outside influence. So the 82nd Airborne has begun visiting village after village, offering basic medical care and attempting to persuade residents to resist the Taliban's brutality. By demonstrating their intent not to shoot, but to offer help, the Army hopes to win the villagers to their cause and, hopefully, improve security enough to begin building much-needed infrastructure.

It's a fine idea, said the villagers, but how could it be done? I'd ask the same. "We would like to support the coalition forces, but if we do that the Taliban will come at night and cut off our heads," worried one villager. Said another, "I know we are supposed to stand up against the Taliban, but we are poor people. We do not have the ability to do that." The lieutenant leading this particular conversation, held town-hall style in a village mosque, took a tough-love approach. "'The truth is that you have the ability to make a change,' he said. 'You are just not willing to do it.'"

While I applaud the Army's choice to address problems in the region by rallying villagers, rather than occupying their villages, in this case I'm not sure the boot-camp approach is really the right one.

Green Day Release New Music Under Bubbly Pseudonym?

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 3:28 PM EST

mojo-photo-foxboro.jpgAh, so this is why news stories are kind of confused about new Green Day material: the Bay Area trio have apparently released six new songs under a pseudonym, Foxboro Hot Tubs. The "official" web site for the Tubs features an EP called Stop Drop and Roll, whose look and sound is decidedly '60s garage rock, but with some eyebrow-raising similarities to Green Day's oeuvre, plus the bands link each other on MySpace, and that's a dead giveaway.

Green Day of course have a history of taking on alternate identities. Back in 2003 they released a new-wavey album under the name The Network, and to this day have never confirmed it was them, although everybody in the world knew. If Green Day are in fact the Tubs, they're taking the secret a little more seriously: a spokesperson for Reprise, Green Day's label, told MTV news he "knew nothing" about Foxboro Hot Tubs.

Stream: Six songs from Foxboro Hot Tubs

The RIAA Nearing Goal of Alienating Everyone in the World

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 3:02 PM EST

Dr. RIAA-loveThe Recording Industry Association of America continues its fight against illegal downloading and music copying, and they're really ratcheting up the insanity. At this point I half expect their spokesperson to ride a nuclear bomb down on illegal downloaders a la Dr. Strangelove. First up, Billboard reports that they've sent another round of "pre-litigations settlement letters" to university campuses this week. This is the 11th wave of such letters, meant to notify the campus network administrators that the kids are downloading "Lip Gloss" again. Out of the 22 institutions which received letters, Minnesota's Gustavus Adolphus led the way, receiving 36 of the notices, followed closely by the University of Southern California at 33. Jonathan Lamy, the RIAA's senior VP of communications, issued this statement from their underground bunker: "For those who ignore these great legal options and ignore years of warnings, we will continue to bring lawsuits. It's not our first choice, but it's a necessary part of the equation."

Much more awesomely, the RIAA is now maintaining that the files on your hard drive you've ripped from the CDs you bought legally at the record store with good old American Rubles are themselves "unauthorized copies." That's right: you buy a CD, rip it to your Mac, pop it on your iPod: you're a criminal two times over. Breakin' the law! Jennifer Pariser, head of litigation from Sony BMG, says that making a copy of a song you own is "just a nice way of saying 'steals just one copy'."

Coming soon: the RIAA demands it be allowed to surgically remove the collections of synapses which "remember" songs illegally in human brains. How are labels supposed to make any money if all of us just sit around thinking about songs we've heard?

Health Care Scare Tactics: More on How Immigration is Overblown

| Wed Dec. 12, 2007 1:28 PM EST

farm-worker.jpg You are aware that illegal immigrants, in addition to taking away jobs from Americans and declining to assimilate and refusing to pay taxes, are a massive drain on the American health system, right? Right??

Actually, let's all just take a deep breath on this immigrant/health care subissue and look at the facts.

...a 2006 RAND study concluded that in 2000, health care for undocumented immigrants between 18 and 64 years old cost taxpayers about $11 per household—roughly the price of a cheeseburger in Manhattan.
Part of the reason the price tag is so low is that our health care system does only the bare minimum for undocumented immigrants. The CBO reports that 1986 Medicaid reforms stipulated that immigrants could receive emergency Medicaid for must-have-care situations like childbirth. But "emergency Medicaid covers only those services that are necessary to stabilize a patient; any other services delivered after a patient is stabilized are not covered." Undocumented immigrants are only assured enough health care to make sure they don't die; so the costs of emergency Medicaid are very low.
Take the example of Oklahoma, whose legislature passed the most sweeping anti-immigration bill in the nation earlier this year... according to the CBO, in 2006 the Oklahoma Health Care Authority spent .31 percent (that's right, less than one-third of one percent) of its budget on emergency Medicaid for undocumented immigrants. And since fiscal year 2003, less than one percent of the individuals served and the dollars spent on Medicaid by the agency have been related to undocumented immigrants—they're barely making a dent in Oklahoma's system.

Take these facts and arm yourself. More after the jump.