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Tom Brady and Mitt Romney: Together for the Super Bowl?

| Tue Jan. 22, 2008 12:45 PM EST

The biggest primary election day of the year: February 5th.

The biggest advertising opportunity of the year: February 3rd.

That's right, the Super Bowl and all of its nationwide advertising potential is just two days before the 20+ state February 5th super duper primary election extravaganza. The candidates are considering taking advantage. The plan may backfire, however: folks who tune into the Super Bowl just to see hilarious and inventive commercials from Pepsi and Budweiser are going to be irritated when they find Romney's handsome but boring mug instead.

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Barack Obama, Wire Fan

| Tue Jan. 22, 2008 1:01 AM EST
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So Barack Obama says his favorite TV show is The Wire. And his favorite character, he tells the Las Vegas Sun, is Omar Little, the charismatic, sawed-off shotgun toting, Honey Nut Cheerios-eating, gay stickup artist. "That's not an endorsement. He's not my favorite person, but he's a fascinating character," says Obama, displaying both admirable honesty and pop-culture cred, yet risking alienating the demographic (i.e., women) that will never forgive Omar for helping set up Stringer Bell. And all the culture warriors who will take issue with Obama calling the gangster "sort of a Robin Hood." But picking your favorite Wire character is all about moral ambiguity—a real minefield for a politician who thinks the answers to these kinds of questions really matter. All the cops are corrupt or boozers or philanderers. The politicians are weasels. And the drug dealers and journalists? Enough said. The only mildly politically safe Wire character I can think of is Lester Freamon, whose biggest sin is a love of miniature furniture. If you want to get a little more daring, you could go for rookie middle-school teacher and ex-police Roland "Prez" Pryzbylewski—but don't forget that he's an accidental cop killer.

The Dems Debate in South Carolina: Ugh

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 11:27 PM EST

dems-debate-south-carolina.jpg It was bound to happen. If you insist on 10,000 debates in a four or five month period, you are going to cover every policy difference, philosophical difference, and tonal difference. It's all over but the shouting, as they say.

And that's what we got tonight with the Democrats' debate in South Carolina: the shouting. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton traded so many jabs and talked over each other so many times that it's hard to remember any one line—the only thing that sticks in the mind, just half an hour later, is the sound of constant squabbling.

And it's bad for the Democratic Party. Every time the Democratic candidates launch attacks on each other, they provide the eventual Republican nominee with ammunition. Not to mention the fact that they obscure their strengths and highlight their weaknesses.

The media coverage is already all about "tensions flaring." Immediately after the debate ended, Anderson Cooper started reshowing the debate's contentious moments. I'm not going to recap any of them here—you can read about them elsewhere or see them on YouTube, but suffice to say, they were simply sharper versions of what you have already heard.

Two moments of actual substance:

Black History Month and Negro-Bibliophilia: We Didn't Start the Fire. Y'all Did

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 10:03 PM EST

With my kids home for four days (dammit), I've had scant time - what with going insane and all - to stay current. That's why the bombardment of black book reviews took me aback for a moment once I got back in the know. Whatever could have caused the sudden interest? It couldn't be the superficial politcal analyses (as opposed to worthy ones like this) attendant upon this election...then it hit me. Oh nooooooo. Black History Month is coming, with all it's attendant neuroses. Batten down the hatches.

I mock, because I must, but I find myself intrigued by this latest crop.

First, Randall Kennedy's Sell Out: The Politics of Racial Betrayal:

Fortunately, it's no how-to manual. Kennedy's chapters are dense, stuffed with facts and anecdotes, compressed almost beyond belief. His second and third chapters move the reader through roughly 177 years of black sellout history in approximately 50 pages. Since this history has been suppressed almost by definition, it has the advantage of offering a fresh look at a rarely considered aspect of black history. I'm pretty sure that the slave commended by his masters for helping to thwart the 1739 Stono Rebellion, in part by killing rebellious fellow bondsmen, has never shown up on any of those black history calendars full of noble-looking portraits of heroes, even though he was named July. You can bet that the words of William Hannibal Thomas, the first black man to attend Otterbein College, have never been trotted out at graduations, sermons, or rallies. Thomas' 1901 screed, "The American Negro: What He Was, What He Is, and What He Will Become: A Critical and Practical Discussion," posits that "the negro represents an intrinsically inferior type of humanity, and one whose predominant characteristics evince an aptitude for a low order of living." Anyone who, like me, has a morbid fascination with deliberately forgotten corners of history and wrongheaded, outdated belief systems like W.H. Thomas' will wish that Kennedy had expanded these chapters, perhaps into their own jaw-dropping, crazy book.
Instead, Kennedy devotes a lengthy chapter to a contemporary Thomas—Supreme Court justice Clarence, that is—whom the author describes as "the most vilified black official in the history of the United States."

Let's just say that Randy (a dear friend and mentor), has a problem with group think.

A Global Recession?

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 10:00 PM EST

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Not since 9/11 has the world seen markets tumble as quickly—or as dramatically—as they did today: While American markets were closed for the federal holiday, the MSCI World Index fell by 3 percent, and Europe's Dow Jones Stoxx 600 Index plummeted by 5.7 percent.

This means a few things:

First of all, Bush and Bernanke's attempt to prevent a recession by calling for a stimulus package didn't quite do the trick. In fact, globally speaking, it probably made things worse:

The selloff followed falls on U.S. markets on Friday that ended the worst weekly performance on Wall Street for five years and a round of bloodletting in Asian markets yesterday, as investors were left underwhelmed by U.S. President George W. Bush's package of measures aimed at stimulating the world's largest economy.

What Do Nerds Dream About? Being Gang Leader for a Day

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 9:05 PM EST

Or, at least, studying him.

In my fantasy life, I wouldn't be refurbishing a compound in Tuscany or climbing Mt. Everest with all the other mid-life crisis chicks. I'd be doing this—urban sociology WEB Dubois-style (he created the discipline, fyi). From the NY Times:

In a bit of bravado Mr. Venkatesh, who now teaches at Columbia, styles himself a "rogue sociologist." Dissatisfied with opinion surveys and statistical analysis as ways to describe the life of the poor, he reverted to the methods of his predecessors at the University of Chicago, who took an ethnographic approach to the study of hobos, hustlers and politicians. Much like a journalist, he observed, asked questions and drew conclusions as he accumulated raw data.
He also learned to hide what he was doing from his academic advisers. Mr. Venkatesh, reared in the comfortable suburbs of Southern California by Indian parents, crossed the line from observer to participant on more than one occasion as he penetrated deeper into the life of the Black Kings and its local captain, the ruthless, charismatic J.T.
When a rival gang sweeps by, guns blazing, he dodges bullets and helps drag a gang lieutenant to safety. When local squatters mete out street justice to a crackhead who has beaten a woman in the projects, he gets a boot in.

Not so much the helping adminster beat-downs part, but the fly on the wall, embedded study of urban culture. I've done a tad, but not nearly as much as I'd like. Instead, I bake cupcakes for the Jammie Day pre-school party and jealously read folks like him and her and him and her. Can't believe I almost forgot him!

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Maybe All the Campaigners Should Learn B. Clinton's Art of Napping

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 8:50 PM EST

Just not on camera.

Bill Clinton caught catching some much needed Z's during MLK Day observance. Can't say I blame him; nothing like hearing King's legacy drained of all complexity at great length by a wannabee to get one to nodding. It does bring home, though, how grueling our ridiculously expanded nomination/electoral process is. Maybe that's why he's been such a sphincter on the campaign trail. However dangerously vicious, homey is a senior citizen. I know I couldn't handle the stress, not without killing someone.

BTW, must be said: the NYP's headline rocks - Bill Clinton has a 'Dream.' Kudos.

Update: Video of Bill's nap after the jump.

Coachella Lineup Announced: No My Bloody Valentine, But Stoners Will Still Be Happy

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 8:41 PM EST

Dark Side of Coachella

Goldenvoice announced the lineup for this year's Coachella festival at a press conference in Mexico City today, and the big surprise turned out to be a bit of a throwback: Roger Waters of Pink Floyd will be appearing on the main stage, in a special performance re-creating the 1973 album Dark Side of the Moon. Oooh-kay. Other big names include the reunited Verve, the Raconteurs, and Love and Rockets; on the electronic side, festival veterans Kraftwerk will return along with Justice, M.I.A. and Sasha & Digweed.

Criticism of the lineup for being a bit underwhelming is starting right up; it happens every year, and it's par for the course, since the pool of "gee-whiz" bookings has almost been exhausted for the nine-year-old festival. However, this year does seem a little heavy on the "artists who seem kind of tired" front: hello, Jack Johnson, Death Cab for Cutie, My Morning Jacket, and Fatboy Slim. But last year's lineup had its share of yawners (Crowded House, anyone?) and like always, the excitement is in the middle: from Animal Collective and Pendulum through Battles and Santogold down through Kid Sister and Modeselektor, the afternoon schedule will be chock full of great music. And hey, if a headliner sucks, that just means you can get back to the hot tub at your place earlier, right?

But yeah, think how awesome My Bloody Valentine would have been... oh well.

The Coachella festival takes place April 25-27 in Indio, California; tickets are on sale this Friday at Coachella.com. Full lineup (complete with new impressionistic poster) after the jump.

American Feminism: Alive and Kicking and Unfortunately, Need Now As Much as Ever

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 7:24 PM EST

If you want to sign Katha Pollit's Open Letter from American Feminists (as at least one commenter does), check out her posting at The Nation. As of a few days ago, she's up to 700.

Need a reason why? Try this: Paraguay's Traffic Hub Imperils Female Teeens, from womensenews.

Ciudad del Este's surrounding Tri Border Area--where Paraguay meets Brazil and Argentina--has over the past five years attracted notoriety as a major hub in international people-trafficking.
Eighty-five percent of trafficking in Paraguay is for sexual exploitation, the International Organization of Migration estimates.
"Women are the victims," says Martha, who doesn't want her name mentioned. She says she has received anonymous death-threats for her anti-trafficking work in Paraguay and the wider region. "More than 90 percent of the victims are women, and more than 90 percent of the exploiters are men."

Or This: In Somalia, Refugee Rape Left to Clan Justice. Also from Womensenews:

The 300 Somehow Manages to Avoid "Worst Picture" Razzie Nomination

| Mon Jan. 21, 2008 3:58 PM EST

Them's some bad movies

Now this is an awards ceremony I can appreciate. The Razzies have been honoring the worst films and performances for 27 years now, and the 2007 nominees were just announced today. While the Lindsay Lohan vehicle I Know Who Killed Me led the pack with nine nominations including Worst Picture, Eddie Murphy's Norbit received eight, with Murphy getting five of those on his own: four for performances and one for his screenplay. I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry also received eight nominations including "Worst Screen Couple;" it's nice to see people come around on this one since the producers really seemed to bamboozle gay rights organizations into acceptance when it came out. Feature-length commercial Bratz and Fred Savage-directed Daddy Day Camp rounded out the Worst Picture nominees, and as I said, neo-fascist paean to pectorals The 300 slipped by without a single nod—you'd think it'd get its own special achievement category or something.

The Razzies will be awarded at a lavish ceremony on February 23rd at, um, Magicopolis in Santa Monica. Full list of nominees after the jump.