As if I hadn't already outed myself as the pinkiest of pinko fag commies, I stumbled upon this gem at Slate's XX blog. It's an interactive quiz from the Center for American Progress to gauge just how liberal or conservative you are. Here's how the Slate-ettes scored:

"Twelve of us took the quiz, and on a scale of 0 to 400 (0 is the least progressive; 400 is the most progressive), we came out with an average score of 245. To put that in context, the mean score for liberal Democrats is 247 and 160.6 for conservative Republicans. Our median is somewhere in the mid-290s; our high is 313, and our low is 112.

Fascist heifers! I scored 332. Boo yah!

The average American drags their Neanderthal asses in at only 209.5.

So, if you outscore me, let's put on our hemp shoes and our tie-dyed bandannas, strap our home-birthed babies on our backs, and go hug some whales.

Damming the Himalayas

A recent report by International Rivers details a rash of dam building projects in the world's most rugged and scenic mountain range:

Massive plans are underway in Pakistan, India, Nepal, and Bhutan to build several hundred dams in the region, with over 150,000 megawatts of additional capacity proposed in the next 20 years in the four countries. If all the planned capacity expansion materializes, the Himalayan region could possibly have the highest concentration of dams in the world.

It's almost certain that this will happen. Sometimes known as the "Third Pole," the Himalayas contain of 3,700 square kilometers of glacial ice, which is melting due to climate change and gushing down the slopes of the 14 tallest peaks in the world. South Asia's boom in population, economic output (which is surprisingly immune to the global downturn), and Western-funded carbon offset projects virtually insures that the forces of dam building will be almost as powerful as the collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates.

Clearly the dams will export cheap and low-carbon electricity. But they will also displace hundreds of thousands of people, import hordes of culturally disruptive migrant laborers, wreck fisheries, and, maybe worst of all, breach in the likely event of an earthquake or climate-change-induced flood, unleashing a cascade of disasters. Novelist Arundhati Roy has eloquently opined against the Narmada dam project, though to little avail. We can only hope that the scenic Himalayas will fare better in the protective embrace of their poets.

Young Feminist Does Not Equal Pole Dancer

Some of the "young chicks" over at Feministing.com and RH Reality Check got fired up about Debra Dickerson's post on abortion providers, and weren't afraid to let us know. Check out the comments here and here. In the original post, Dickerson points out a New York Times article about the declining number of abortion providers. It's asserted that young feminists (male and female) are not making abortion services a priority, and as a result, abortion access in the future is endangered.

Firstly, I always take a New York Times trend piece with a rather huge grain of salt. These are the folks, after all, who brought us the Opt-Out Revolution and Dating A Banker Anonymous. Secondly, I think where Dickerson goes astray is when she suggests that young feminists today enjoy "pole-dancing, walking around half-naked, posting drunk photos on Facebook, and blogging about your sex lives" rather than working for reproductive rights. And thirdly, not all feminists are female.

As our commenters have pointed out, young feminists actually do lots of abortion-related work, whether it's protesting on the streets or volunteering for organizations. Living in San Francisco, I know a LOT of feminists, and none of them post drunk pictures of themselves online, or pole-dance, or walk around half-naked. Or at least, none of them have let me in on it. As for myself, I'm definitely a feminist, and youngish (30). I've cold-called for NARAL, donated to NOW, and marched in rallies, but have yet to walk around half-naked unless I'm changing at the gym.

Part of what I think rankled the Feministing crowd (and tell me if I'm wrong) is that Dickerson paints young feminists with a wide, LiLo-train-wreck colored brush. There's a big difference between what young feminists do today, and what the media depicts them as doing. The media publishes stories about 16-year-olds with racy MySpace profiles and sex-positive pole-dancers because they get a response. I think the best response to Dickerson's post, aside from pointing out the many achievements of young feminists, is a little bit of humor. As my co-worker and copy editor extrordinaire Nicole McClelland told me, putting all young feminists in the category of drunken strippers is a dramatic overgeneralization at best. "I didn’t know that that’s what the current generation of feminists thinks feminism is," said Nicole. "Now that I do, though, I’m totally going to call some and ask them if they want to party."

Some Prison Tips for Bernie Madoff

So Bernie Madoff's spending the weekend in a 7-by-8 jail cell, and come June 16, he's likely to start a lengthy stint in federal prison. Sure, he'll probably go to a minimum-security facility, but his new surroundings will take some getting used to. Fortunately, Mother Jones is here to help. While researching our package on the prison meltdown last year, we came across all kinds of helpful info for the would-be white-collar convict. A few tips Madoff might find useful: One, when a fellow prisoner talks about "high class," he's more likely talking about Hepatitis C than season tickets to the Met. Two, be wary of opaque financial transactions with shady characters: As a former prisoner told us, "If you bum a smoke and the guy with the cigarettes says, 'Sure, it's a twofer,' you should know a twofer means, 'I give you one for two, so now you owe me.'" And lastly, read the rest of our advice while you still can—Mother Jones is contraband in some joints.

Photo by Flickr user sabeth718 used under a CC License

Earth Hour Hong Kong 香 港

Yeah, right, you say, it's so 2007 and when are we going to do more than turn off the lights for one hour a year? Except it's still a novel concept in many places and one waking up the Rip-Van-Winkles sleeping with their lights on.

I'm talking about Hong Kong. The most brightly lit place on Earth apart from Las Vegas, IMO. It's a neon wet dream. Strolling the streets after dark here is, well, the lure of a sci-fi siren, deadly and gorgeous with light.

Still, Hong Kong's per capita ranking of CO2 emissions falls well below the US: Hong Kong #72; US #10. And both are far shy of #1 Qatar, The Sheikdom of Squander.

Andy Cornish, Director of Conservation WWF Hong Kong, tells me that Hong Kong has not yet officially joined the 1,429 cities and towns in 80 countries (and counting) that will go dark for one hour starting 8:30pm Saturday 28 March. [Correction: Andy tells me Hong Kong IS onboard, Macau is not... yet.] Three hundred Hong Kong companies and countless individuals are already down with the plan.

The hope? That one billion people all over Planet Earth will flip their switches this year. But, hey, use protection, please, if that's your orientation. We don't need an Earth Hour baby boom nine months from now.

As for some of the pyrotechnics lined up in the dark:

  • Sydney (where it all started): every ferry in the harbor will sound its horn at 8.30pm
  • Melbourne: people will pedal-power a concert in Federation Square
  • Athens: a circle of percussion will be held at the Acropolis, people given instruments and led by a conductor
  • Oslo: people will peddle-power light bulbs
  • Lisbon: the city will go outdoors for candlelit dining

So, yeah, it's kind of 2007. Only the hour is later and bigger and DARKER.

Video: The YouTube Supergroup



Demonstrating once again the power of mashuppery to make not-so-good things into tolerable things, or even terrible things into great things, an Israeli musician calling himself Kutiman has created a... um... I'm not sure what to call it. Remix/medley/edit/completely new song? Whatever it is, Kutiman has named it "The Mother of All Funk Chords," and it's made entirely out of YouTube clips of individual musicians practicing, showing off, or giving lessons. Most of these clips are of the cringe-inducing, lonely-guy-in-his-ugly-living-room variety, but the final product is jaw-dropping and inspiring. It's almost as if Kutiman has created an imaginary virtual world where all these lonely, unknown dudes have found each other, a single chord that unites them. Watch the video above or go to his home page, thru-you.com, for more stuff in Kutiman's continuing YouTube remix project.
Singer Michael Jackson has sold out all 750,000 tickets to his run of 50 shows at London's O2 Arena in just hours today, reports Billboard, at an average rate of about 11 per second. Ticketmaster UK called it the "busiest demand for tickets" they have ever experienced. The 50 shows will supposedly take place in July, August, and September of this year, as well as January and February of 2010. The publicity has pushed sales of Jackson's albums up as well, with sales of Thriller up 80% at stores in the UK and Ireland. The lesson I take from this is that if I act all crazy and allegedly abusive and transparently arrogant and dishonest and mess up my face a whole bunch, I could sell more tickets to my DJ gigs. Although, come to think of it, maybe having something as stupendous as "Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough" on the resume might help, as well. Video for that after the jump.

The reason that taxpayers have had to prop up AIG to the tune of $173 billion is that AIG is now basically a conduit—it owes money to so many other companies that the cash just pours right through. If AIG doesn't pay its counterparties—the entities on other end of its bad bets on the subprime mortgage market, the counterparties might go belly-up, too. That's why the bailout of AIG is sometimes referred to as a "backdoor bailout" for other companies. The people and companies on the receiving end of the "backdoor bailout" are AIG's counterparties, and so far, the Treasury and the Fed have been keeping their names secret. Now the Project on Government Oversight (POGO) is trying to change that.

On Thursday, Danielle Brian, POGO's executive director, wrote to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke warning that "the government's unprecedented effort to rescue the American International Group (AIG) from collapse has been marred by a lack of disclosure and a troubling appearance of favoritism toward Goldman Sachs, one of AIG's most prominent counterparties." Former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson was Goldman's CEO. The department's assistant secretary in charge of the bailout, Neil Kashkari, and chief of staff, Mark Patterson, among others, are also former Goldman employees. "By withholding crucial details about Goldman Sachs and the other counterparties to AIG, you have given the public ample reason to question the integrity of the government's decisions related to the bailout," Brian wrote.

Friday Cat Blogging - 13 March 2009

Today is Friday the 13th and Inkblot and Domino have decided they should lie low.  No point in taking chances, right?  My mother's kittens, however, have no such superstitions and were delighted to romp around for the camera.  On the left, Ditto (because he's a carbon copy of one of my mother's other cats) is staring at a bug in the garden, waiting for a chance to pounce.  It came a few seconds after I took this picture.  On the right, Tillamook (because he looks like a piece of cheese) has scampered up a tree and is obviously delighted with the way the setting sun shows off his orange coat.

(And why was I over visiting mom?  Because Tillamook dived into her wall unit the other day, knocked the cable box down the back, and then bolted out of the room.  He was fine.  The TV, not so much.  So I went over to fish the thing out and get it reconnected.  Only time will tell if Tilly has learned his lesson.)

In South Africa, which already boasts one of the world's highest rape rates, black lesbians are being targeted for particularly brutal assaults. The frequent victims of gang assaults and hideous torture, the government does absolutely nothing. One woman spoke of her gang-rapists taunting her with the "classic lesson" they were imparting during her 2003 abduction. At least she survived. And damned if she isn't still living her life as an out and proud lesbian and high-profile "footballer." Where do Third World women find the courage?

The government, even in the case of a rare prosecution, refuses to acknowledge that lesbians are being specifically targeted. Called "corrective rape" by human rights workers (i.e. rape meant to set the lesbos straight), pressure is mounting for the judiciary there to dub attacks on lesbians hate crimes and forcefully prosecute these criminals. Good luck.

FromThe Guardian:

"The partially clothed body of Eudy Simelane, former star of South Africa's acclaimed Banyana Banyana national female football squad, was found in a creek in a park in Kwa Thema, on the outskirts of Johannesburg. Simelane had been gang-raped and brutally beaten before being stabbed 25 times in the face, chest and legs. As well as being one of South Africa's best-known female footballers, Simelane was a voracious equality rights campaigner and one of the first women to live openly as a lesbian in Kwa Thema.
Her brutal murder took place last April, and since then a tide of violence against lesbian women in South Africa has continued to rise...Now, a report by the international NGO ActionAid, backed by the South African Human Rights Commission, condemns the culture of impunity around these crimes, which it says are going unrecognised by the state and unpunished by the legal system.

If South Africa isn't going to prosecute crime, should the women there, straight and gay, go commando and start parceling out justice on their own?