Blogs

Vishnu Ad Death Threats? An Onion Editor Responds.

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 7:39 PM EDT

onion%20vishnu%20150x300.jpgThe Onion's website recently featured a four-armed, blue-hued Vishnu incarnated as a serenely multitasking Indian call center operator. Thank Allah that Onion editors had enough sense not to exploit images of the prophet Muhammad instead to hawk its latest hardback collection of ironic misinformation.

But although there are no bombed embassies to speak of, the Onion ad has sparked controversy among Indian journalists.

"Instead of finding something that we could all laugh along with, the Onion seems content in giving us something sufficiently exotic that some of us can laugh at," writes one commenter on the South Asian Journalists Association's online forum.

"Perhaps some of us have gotten too comfortable here in the US to truly understand what is happening back home and instead respond with the cliche "offended minority" reaction," writes another.

I asked Onion editorial manager Chet Clem if he received any death threats in response to the Vishnu house ad. His response:

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CD Review: Lil Wayne - Tha Carter III

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 6:36 PM EDT

mojo-photo-lilwaynecarter.jpgDelays are never, ever a good sign. If the release of your highly-anticipated creative work keeps getting pushed back, it's pretty much a given that when it finally emerges, it'll be bloated and uneven, overcooked in spots and raw in others. I'd hoped mixtape master Lil Wayne would prove the exception to this rule, but the long-delayed Tha Carter III (in stores today) is more mixed bag than mixtape, with brief hints of the head-spinning magic that made his bootleg releases so exciting marred by dull (if financially successful) attempts at mainstream appeal.

Evangelicals Hold Their Breaths as Baptism Numbers Drop

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 4:55 PM EDT
moral-majority250.jpg

In our current issue Debra Dickerson writes approvingly of Christine Wicker's new book, The Fall of the Evangelical Nation, which makes the case that evangelical Christians are not as multitudinous as they—or the media and the religious right—have made themselves out to be. In her number crunching, Wicker found that the Southern Baptists have been making some generous estimates of their flock: They've claimed to be 16 million strong, but she estimates the real number of devoted churchgoers is 4 million or fewer. Now, USA Today reports, there are new indications that the church is losing demographic ground:

Top 10: Animal Planet Does Father's Day

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 4:45 PM EDT

Animal Planet is celebrating Father's Day with an A-List of Nature's Best Dads.

Top contenders include the golden jackal (monogamous), the seahorse (pregnant), and the Emperor penguin, (good with kids).

But is the lion, (fiercely protective) really a "better" father than Eastern grey squirrels, which routinely eat their young?

Here's hoping Animal Planet will continue anthropomorphizing all year—plenty of holidays await!

Perhaps a special on financially responsible animals (those beavers, saving up all that wood) for April 15? A drone bee retrospective for Labor Day?—Daniel Luzar

Fun With Excel: How Has Age Played In Presidential Elections Since 1789?

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 4:19 PM EDT

There's already been some good examination of how much the age gap between John McCain and Barack Obama will matter in November. ThingsYoungerThanMcCain.com, for example, is doing the yeoman's work of listing the many, many items—like lubricated condoms and the LP record—that are younger than McCain.

And the folks at the Pew Research Center conducted a poll in February that found 26 percent of registered voters think John McCain is too old to be president (the number jumps to 32 percent when voters are told that McCain is 71).

We know that Barack Obama will be 47 on election day and McCain will be 72, meaning that 2008 will see a larger age gap between the top two presidential candidates than any of the previous 55 presidential elections. So here's my question: how has age played in presidential elections in the past? Let's look at a chart (takeaways at the bottom):

Brazen McCain Flip-Flop on the Estate Tax

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 1:46 PM EDT

The Wonk Room has a good catch.

McCain in September 2005:

"I follow the course of a great Republican, Teddy Roosevelt, who talked about the malefactors of great wealth and gave us the estate tax. I oppose the rich passing on fortunes."

McCain yesterday:

"The estate tax is one of the most unfair tax laws on the books."

This of course compliments McCain's biggest tax flip flop. Back when he cared more about principle and less about winning elections, he was against the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy. Now he's for them, and more.

Former McCain flip-flops here and here.

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Should We Care About the First Mrs. McCain?

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 1:33 PM EDT

The UK Daily Mail recently posted a rare interview with Carol Shepp McCain, a woman eager to join the largely forgettable ranks—Hannah Van Buren, anyone?—of almost-first ladies.

So here's what Carol broke her silence to say:

Carol insists she remains on good terms with her ex-husband, who agreed as part of their divorce settlement to pay her medical costs for life. 'I have no bitterness,' she says. 'My accident is well recorded. I had 23 operations, I am five inches shorter than I used to be and I was in hospital for six months. It was just awful, but it wasn't the reason for my divorce.

Yep, scintillating stuff indeed.

Your call as to whether or not some journalist will be able to extract a negative word from the former Mrs. McCain this election cycle. They'll certainly keep trying.

—Daniel Luzer

Hey, a Brand New Bush Administration Scandal!

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 1:19 PM EDT

Who would have thought it was possible, at this late date?

Apparently, the DOJ's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has been handing out its National Juvenile Justice Grants not based on the interests of America's at-risk kids, but on cronyism and fraud.

Programs ranked as highly effective by DOJ staff were ignored and denied funding, sometimes because they taught sex ed or because they catered to gay and lesbian teens. Meanwhile, poorly ranked programs were awarded millions of dollars because they had political, social, or religious connections to the Bush Administration. None of the top six programs received money, but the World Golf Foundation, ranked 47 out of 104, was funded. Former President George H. W. Bush sits on its board.

The full report is at ABC News. Embedding seems impossible. TNR notes that this exact scandal happened during the Reagan Administration.

New McCain Line: Obama = Carter

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 11:17 AM EDT

Yesterday, in an interview with NBC's Brian Williams, John McCain introduced a historical analogy that he obviously hopes will be as sticky as McCain = Bush. "Sen. Obama says that I'm running for a Bush's third term. It seems to me he's running for Jimmy Carter's second," he said. "I think this — election is about change, Brian. I think it's the right kind of change versus the wrong kind of change. Sen. Obama wants to dust off the old big government, high taxes ideas of the 60s and 70s that failed then."

First of all, as I've said before, I don't see how McCain wins when the argument for his candidacy is fundamentally a defensive one. To paraphrase McCain, he's saying, "I accept Sen. Obama's terms for this election; it is about change. And even though he's become synonymous with change, I believe I'm the better kind of change." That's weak. And not likely to be effective.

And neither is this Carter analogy. People obviously associate certain things with Carter that McCain wants people associating with Obama. Smart but weak. Unable to deal with high gas prices, a struggling economy, or trouble in the middle east. I get that. But Carter took office more than 30 years ago. As MSNBC's First Read points out, no one who is under 50 today was eligible to vote when Carter first won election. Doesn't this just cement the idea that McCain is stuck in the past, and still sees the world in outdated terms?

World Leaders Take Gloves Off With Bush

| Tue Jun. 10, 2008 10:57 AM EDT

Now that (1) George Bush is exiting the presidency and (2) he is wildly unpopular in his own country, international leaders are willing to criticize him more openly. And not only are they willing to criticize him, they are willing to do so on the record and in their country's most famous newspaper.

On the eve of President Bush's arrival in Germany, German leaders are taking Bush to the woodshed in Der Spiegel. Witness:

Hans-Ulrich Klose, foreign policy expert for the center-left Social Democrats and deputy chairman of the German parliament's foreign affairs committee, said: "One really can't say George W. Bush made the world a better place. On the contrary: His actions played a big part in damaging America's image around the world."
Guido Westerwelle, the head of the business-friendly Free Democratic Party, said: "The Bush era was not a good one — neither for America nor for those who see themselves as friends of America." … The Iraq war weakened the UN, he said, adding that the Guantanamo Bay detention camp was a "disgrace to all the values that America, of all countries, stands for."
Jürgen Trittin, a senior member of the opposition Green Party, said Bush "definitely made the world worse."

As recent polling shows, these leaders are just reflecting the sentiment of their constituents.