Blogs

Waxman to EPA Official: When You Appear Before Me, You Shall Bring Documents

| Fri May 16, 2008 2:14 PM EDT

On Friday Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), the chair of the House oversight committee, sent a letter to Stephen L. Johnson, the EPA administrator. It wasn't a friendly note. Waxman is frustrated that the EPA has failed to comply with his May 5 subpoena for "more than 30 documents relating to communications with offices in the White House." (The committee is investigating political interference with the work of EPA scientists.) Waxman explains that Johnson has "two basic options for each of the documents: provide the document to the Committee or assert executive privilege with respect to the document."

So far, the White House hasn't asserted executive privilege with regards to the documents Waxman wants. That means that if he doesn't bring the requested documents to a May 20 hearing where he is expected to appear, Johnson will be in defiance of the subpoena. The Chairman didn't mince words, either. The first sentence of the letter reads: "I am writing to advise you that when you appear before the Committee on May 20, 2008, you should appear with documents."

Waxman's not known for bluffing, so it should be quite a scene if Mr. Johnson shows up next Tuesday without his homework. I'll keep you posted.

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Devastating Article by Israel's Top Journalist on Casino Mogul Sheldon Adelson

| Fri May 16, 2008 2:10 PM EDT

One of Israel's top journalists and commentators Nahum Barnea writes in his column at Yediot Aharanot today about Sheldon Adelson throwing his political weight around in Israel.

When Sheldon Adelson gave his speech on the podium of the International Convention Center two days ago, I looked at Shimon Peres. I was happy for him. [...]

As a citizen of the country, I was less happy. I saw a gambling tycoon from Las Vegas who bought my country's birthday with three million dollars. I thought with sorrow: Is the country worth so very little? Were the champagne and the wine and the sushi that were given out for free in the lobby, unlike what is conventional for such events, worth the humiliation?
Adelson is a Jew who loves Israel. Like some other Jews who live at a safe distance from here, his love is great, passionate, smothering. It is important to him that he influence the policies, decisions and compositions of Israeli governments. He is not alone in this, eithe ... This kowtowing to other people's wallets-that is the common denominator of Rabin and Peres, Netanyahu, Barak and Olmert. [...]
Adelson is like the others, and yet different. He has the gift of authority and the bluntness of someone who made a lot of money quickly. He does not ask. He commands.

Bush's Politicking at Israel's Knesset Neglects His Role in Hamas' Election Win

| Fri May 16, 2008 2:08 AM EDT

You've likely already read about Bush using the opportunity of his address to Israel's parliament, the Knesset, yesterday to liken all those who would negotiate with "terrorists and radicals" to Nazi appeasers -- and Democrats' swift and outraged response.

Beyond the fact that Bush's own administration has repeatedly offered to negotiate with Tehran should Iran suspend uranium enrichment, and that his top diplomat in Iraq has talked with his Iranian counterparts, as has his former ambassador to Afghanistan, both with the White House blessing, as well as the ongoing negotiations with Pyongyang, Libya, and the Syrian deputy foreign minister's visit to Annapolis; beyond those recent demonstrated exceptions in action to Bush's rhetoric (I guess the word for it is "hypocrisy"): It's also worth pointing out, as several Israeli security officials and political observers have recently done to me here, a bit of recent history Bush neglected to mention at Israel's parliament. That Israel and the Palestinian Authority have chiefly him to thank for Hamas having a degree of political legitimacy it otherwise would not have had. After all, they point out, it was the Bush administration that "twisted the arm" of Israeli and Palestinian leaders against considerable resistance and skepticism on their part to allow the Palestinian militant group Hamas to run in 2006 Palestinian elections that Hamas won -- an outcome to its policy interventions that the Bush administration once again failed to anticipate.

Embryos Up for Personhood in Colorado, Even the Gay Ones?

| Thu May 15, 2008 9:09 PM EDT

Lots of big news the last couple of days. The polar bear apparently has the right to protection under the Endangered Species Act. California same-sex couples can, in fact, marry. McCain has amended his Iraq 100-year-plan to say most troops will out by 2013. Hell, we may even tax porn. But amid all of the news of progress have you heard this one?

On Tuesday the group Colorado for Equal Rights submitted 131,245 signatures to place an initiative on the November ballot that would define a fertilized embryo as a person. Voters will decide on the measure that would amend the state Constitution to extend a fertilized embryo equal rights and protections. It would define "any human being from the moment of fertilization" as a "person" for purposes of the state's constitutional provisions "relating to inalienable rights, equality of justice and due process of law."

Never mind that the 'moment of fertilization' is not a medical definition and is almost impossible to determine. Consensus from women's rights organizations is that the amendment would be catastrophic for women and their ability to determine their own futures. Doctors and legal rights experts say the amendment could trigger governmental investigations into miscarriages, restrict in-vitro fertilization by couples trying to conceive, and could limit birth-control methods.

And to those hundred thousand-plus Coloradoans who endorsed the measure into being, if they so passionately believe in equal rights, what about the gay embryos? Equality still fair game? Just a thought.

And Now, the Honeymoon

| Thu May 15, 2008 8:43 PM EDT

Most people aren't alive for their parents' wedding day, but I was. The date was February 16, 2004, four days after Mayor Gavin Newsom announced that San Francisco would issue marriage certificates to same-sex couples. My parents had been together for 24 years at that point, so it was natural for them to question the value of a piece of paper when the test of time had already validated their relationship. But when the right to marry presented itself four years ago, they jumped on it.

With their friends Frank and John, my moms drove two hours from their home in Monterey to the majestic steps of San Francisco's city hall. That first day, the line of elated couples waiting to be married wrapped around the building, more couples than city officials had time to handle, and so they came back at 6am the next day and stood in line for 13 hours. Cars drove by honking in support, restaurants brought beverages and food to the waiting masses, strangers dropped off flowers and balloons, and cheers erupted each time a set of newlyweds came through city hall's golden doors. And then, what began as a historic event televised around the world became a wholly personal moment for my family. I listened on the phone from Atlanta as my moms exchanged their vows. (Because we'd had no notice of Mayor Newsom's bold move and because no one knew how long the opportunity would last, I didn't have enough time to fly home for the occasion.)

Students Think Liberating Lab Animals Is Lame

| Thu May 15, 2008 8:23 PM EDT

The results of our student activism survey are already flooding in, and respondents—both current and former students—believe the lamest form of activism is liberating lab animals (second place: tree sitting). Don't miss your chance to chime in.

We're still looking for the lowdown on student activism, past and present. Been arrested and regret it? Would your school win the prize for silliest student protest? Was student activism way better when you were in school? Is your cause unique?

Help us put together our best student activism roundup yet. It's our 15th annual! Check out last year's. Answer a few quick questions and you could win some cool prizes.

Click here to begin!

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Jon Voight Goes Off the Rails in Israel

| Thu May 15, 2008 7:07 PM EDT

voight2.jpg

I'll never watch Midnight Cowboy the same way again. It was clear something was up with Jon Voight last year when he went on Fox and, between queries about daughter Angelina, told an elated Bill O'Reilly that America's liberal professoriate was a dangerous fifth column. He slammed unnamed but "cunning professionals" for feeding "propaganda" to the "extremists" who criticize President Bush. And—remember this in exactly two sentences—he repeatedly condemned "religious fanaticism."

Now Voight has traveled to Israel to, as Haaretz reported yesterday, "express ... his opposition to exchanging land for peace with the Palestinians." Says Voight in an interview clip accompanying the story: "God gave this land to the Jewish people; they shouldn't be giving it away." He tearfully calls Israel "the sole reminder of the survival of the Jewish people."

Himself not Jewish, Voight also sent around a strange primary appeal earlier this year in which he declared, "Every Jew should be voting for Giuliani." Look, I'm all for philo-Semitism, but what's with this guy?

—Justin Elliott

Photo used under a Creative Commons license from jesilu_mac.

Reliable Replacement Warheads Rejected by House

| Thu May 15, 2008 6:40 PM EDT

Back in April, I reported on the White House's back-door attempts to secure funding for a new generation of nuclear weapons—a missile called a Reliable Replacement Warhead. Well, Congressional Democrats weren't fooled by the administration's efforts and today the House Armed Services committee zeroed out funding for the project in the Defense Authorization bill.

Ten million dollars for the project still remain in the Senate's version of the bill, which will be reconciled with the House legislation later this year.

Film Review: The Judge and the General

| Thu May 15, 2008 5:35 PM EDT

SFIFF_JudgeandtheGeneral.jpgNow retired Chilean judge Juan Guzman conducts a long, tedious investigation into the brutal killings and disappearances that took place during the country's Pinochet regime in The Judge and the General, an 84-minute documentary film that had its world premier recently at the San Francisco International Film Festival.

The film is Guzman's journey toward discovery; of the atrocities linked to Pinochet, and to his own self-awareness as a judge in search of truth who initially was skeptical about taking on the investigation. Guzman and his crew of lab technicians, police, and government officials travel to all corners of the country to study bones of those who were killed, interview their surviving family members, and review piles of documents.

One audience member at the San Francisco screening, during an open-mic Q&A, told Guzman he was a "fraud" and that he should be ashamed of himself for taking credit for taking down Pinochet. After the loud "Boos" and hisses (and one or two claps) died down, Guzman said, "You obviously don't know what you are talking about," and applause filled the room.

McCain Sounding Obama-esque

| Thu May 15, 2008 5:16 PM EDT

Here's a portion of that speech that David mentioned earlier today. It's kind of hard to tell which presumptive nominee is speaking.

If I am elected President, I will work with anyone who sincerely wants to get this country moving again. I will listen to any idea that is offered in good faith and intended to help solve our problems, not make them worse. I will seek the counsel of members of Congress from both parties in forming government policy before I ask them to support it. I will ask Democrats to serve in my administration. My administration will set a new standard for transparency and accountability. I will hold weekly press conferences. I will regularly brief the American people on the progress our policies have made and the setbacks we have encountered. When we make errors, I will confess them readily, and explain what we intend to do to correct them. I will ask Congress to grant me the privilege of coming before both houses to take questions, and address criticism, much the same as the Prime Minister of Great Britain appears regularly before the House of Commons.

A lot of this is admirable (who knows if it'll actually happen, but it's nice to hear), especially the last line about taking direct questions from the rank and file of Congress. But if McCain wants to "set a new standard for transparency," he might ask his wife to release her tax returns. That would meet the current standard of transparency.

Update: I would also add that the cause of political reconciliation isn't furthered by implying your opponent is a Nazi appeaser.