Blogs

Prince Declares Images of Prince Off-Limits

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 11:51 PM EST

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Lawyers for Prince have ordered several of the superstar's biggest fan sites to remove any image that bears his likeness prompting fans to form a group to fight the demands. Three websites: housequake.com, princefams.com and prince.org have come together to form 'Prince Fans United' in response to the situation, which even sees demands to remove images of fans own tattoos. - NME

Bruce Springsteen has instructed his legal team to track down all web sites which feature his ass and have them eliminated, the Riff has learned. The New Jersey star's rear, clad in worn denim, bulged proudly on the cover of the 1984 album Born in the U.S.A., and lawyers believe any internet representation of the cheeks' signature curves could constitute an income loss, as fans ogle the booty for free instead of purchasing the album. The Boss has enlisted a squadron of buttock investigators to identify his own personal posterior amongst what experts say must be "as many as 30" other backsides pictured on the internet. No bloggers were available for a rebuttal.

Chicago rappers Cool Kids have demanded all pictures of cool kids be removed from all websites, despite the fact that the members of the band themselves are not kids, and only cool in a kind of ironic sense. "We saw some pictures of like a couple actual cool kids on the news, and we had the feeling maybe the news guys were making fun of us, since that's the name of our band," said Cool Kid Mikey Rocks, wearing a fluorescent pink baseball cap. When asked if they were trying to be funny or ironic or artsy with their request, he replied, "I don't even know any more," while making air quotes with his fingers.

In a related story, obscure 80s combo The The have demanded all instances of the article which they doubled to form the name of their band be excised from the internet, starting at the end of the sentence you are reading on the Riff right now. "There's tons of other determiners around for people to use that don't interfere with our clients' ability to control their own image," said a spokesperson, "like 'a,' or even 'an,' and in many circumstances, 'da.'" Da spokesperson then ran out of da room, so nobody could take his picture.

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Money Bomb! Ron Paul Raises Almost $3 Million in a Single Day

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 11:48 PM EST

It's called a money bomb, and it's the unique province of Ron Paul supporters. This is getting to be one of the most bizarre phenomenons American politics has seen in decades.

Update: An email from the Paul campaign makes it clear that they're still going.

Is it possible to comprehend what we've done today? Earth-shattering, jaw-dropping... No matter which way you phrase it, Ron Paul is for real.
Over $3,800,000 raised.
More than 35,000 total donations.
1 message - and 1 candidate - unlike any other.
Can we keep our momentum going? The most successful fundraising day ever is John Kerry's $5.7 million. And that was on the day he accepted the Democratic nomination.

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Obey Won't Say Whether They'll Fund Bunker Busters For Iran

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 7:24 PM EST

The Bush administration recently sent Congress a request for $196 billion in "emergency" funding for Iraq and Afghanistan. Last week ABC reported that it includes one line asking for $88 million to upgrade stealth bombers to carry the 30,000-pound "massive ordnance penetrator":

So where would the military use a stealth bomber armed with a 30,000-pound bomb like this? Defense analysts say the most likely target for this bomb would be Iran's flagship nuclear facility in Natanz, which is both heavily fortified and deeply buried.
"You'd use it on Natanz," said John Pike of GlobalSecurity.org. "And you'd use it on a stealth bomber because you want it to be a surprise. And you put in an emergency funding request because you want to bomb quickly."

Today David Obey (D-WI), the Democratic Chairman of the Appropriations Committee, appeared at the National Press Club. You can see the footage via C-Span.

At 42:10, Obey is asked whether he plans to fund the bunker busters. He speaks for over three minutes, beginning by saying "Our Iran policy has been spectacularly stupid for 50 years," references the 1953 CIA coup, and asks, "Wouldn't we have been better off if we left Mossadegh in place?" Yet he never answers the question.

When Obey finally winds down, at 45:30, the moderator asks again: "Will you fund the bunker busters?" Obey replies:

Musharraf's Pathetic Attempt to Cling to Power, Independent Media Suffers

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 7:13 PM EST

This Saturday General Pervez Musharraf decided it was time to just sock it to anyone who stood in his way of holding onto power. He imposed an "emergency rule"—effectively martial law—suspending the Constitution and sacking the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court after the judges refused to abide by the order and declared it illegal. Over 600 lawyers, activists, and opponents were detained. As police assaulted lawyers and other protesters with tear gas and batons, thousands were arrested, including 1,200 lawyers in the second largest Pakistani city, Lahore. On Sunday, over 70 activists and 14 journalists were arrested at a meeting held by Human Rights Commission of Pakistan in order to discuss the current state. HRCP Chairwoman Asma Jehangir was placed under house arrest.

Musharraf claims that this was a move to save Pakistan from extremism, but some point out that he had been informed by an aide that the Supreme Court might declare his October 6 "re-election" illegal. Furthermore, the fact that the parliamentary elections, scheduled for January, have also been put off can be seen as a maneuver to stall elections. And the proclamation the general issued is a "charge sheet" against the judicial branch as he accuses the judiciary of "working at cross purposes with the executive and legislature" and argues that its "constant" and "increasing interference" with the executive branch is undermining the "war on terrorism." His use of "terrorism" as reason for imposing martial law is, to put it bluntly, bullshit.

Along with the judiciary, the media bears the brunt in this recent clampdown for its critical coverage. For the third day in a row, independent news channels have been blacked out in Pakistan, as well as access to several websites. Aaj TV had its offices raided, similar to how GEO TV earned a visit from the police in a previous crackdown of the Pakistani media in June. A new press ordinance has also been issued to further silence the media. The strictures prohibit any material which "ridicules" or "brings disrepute to the Head of the State" and armed forces and proves to be a threat to the "ideology of Pakistan."

—Neha Inamdar

Weird Weather Watch: Tabasco, Soused

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 6:02 PM EST

Many environmentalist and NGO analysts are predicting that Mexico will suffer disproportionately from climate change, amplifying immigration problems in the United States.

It looks like they might be right. The state of Tabasco in southern Mexico is suffering from the worst floods the flood-prone region has ever seen. Water rose in Villahermosa, the state capital, fast enough to drown out one-storey buildings in an hour. More than 300,000 people had to leave their homes.

The most ominous problem is that the contaminated water may stimulate outbreaks of cholera, malaria and dengue fever.

New Species in Aleutian Islands

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 3:03 PM EST

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Photo courtesy of Stephen Jewett, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

Deep in the frigid waters of the Aleutian islands, scientists have discovered three new species—two kinds of sea anemones that drift along with ocean currents (other anemones tend to stay put in one place) and a ten-foot-long brown kelp that grows near ocean vents. Scientists believe that the new kelp might be part of a new seaweed genus or family. Check out a photo gallery of the newbies (and other Aleutian critters) here.

Stretching out about 1,200 miles between Alaska and the Kamchatka Peninsula, the Aleutian islands are among the most remote land masses in the world. Last year, the North Pacific Fishery Management Council voted to ban the destructive practice of bottom trawling in more than 300,000 square miles off Alaska's coast, which is great news for the Aleutians. But the trawling ban doesn't solve the problem of pollution—researchers have found traces of industrial chemicals in the area, as well as unexploded ordinance leftover from WWII.

For an insider's perspective on conservation in this corner of the world, check out this interview with Erin McKittrick and Bretwood "Hig" Higman, a couple in the midst of a 4,000 mile hiking/rafting/skiing journey from Seattle up into the Aleutians.

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Protests Continue Against "Demeaning" Hip-Hop Videos

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 1:21 PM EST

mojo-photo-gangster.jpgWe've covered protests over hip-hop lyrics from a couple perspectives here on the Riff (now that's fair and balanced!) and the controversy continues: today the New York Times is reporting protestors are targeting media companies like Viacom (owner of MTV and BET) for "degrading" music videos. The protesters have been targeting the homes of company executives, but their goals seem a little vague:

Among other things the protesters want media companies like Viacom to develop "universal creative standards" for video and music, including prohibitions on some language and images. Video vixens and foul-mouthed pimps and thugs are now so widespread, the protesters maintain, that they infect perceptions of ordinary nonwhite people. … "A lot of rap isn't rap anymore, it's just people selling their souls," Marc Newman, a 28-year-old car salesman from New Rochelle, N.Y., said on Saturday. He was among about 20 men, women and children from area Baptist churches marching outside the Upper East Side residence of Philippe Dauman, the president and chief executive of Viacom Inc.

While 20 people isn't that impressive, and Enough is Enough shares their name with another group focused on protecting our children from "hard-core sexually-explicit materials that is harmful to our youth" (uh, sic?), the Times reminds us that both the N.A.A.C.P. and the National Congress of Black Women are on the side of "more corporate responsibility" when it comes to music videos. The sentiments have perhaps been explained more clearly by the blog BrilliantBrown.com, in reaction to the BET show "Hot Ghetto Mess": "At this point, I'm beginning to wonder if BET has been secretly purchased by the KKK or something." Jeez, the KKK or the Taliban, do I have to pick a side?

Cavett's Cavils

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 11:05 AM EST

The only good thing to come of the recent scandals which illuminate white racism is the threadbare victory of blacks' having all their conspiracy theories validated. For all the good that does. Of course, the primary victory is one which is totally lost on those who apologize for it -- proof that skin privilege, with all its attendant social costs, is alive and well. Not far from first place in the pyrrhic victory category is the fall collection of the Emperor's New Clothes that is white intellectual superiority. Man, how hard privilege has to work to deny itself. I can't decide whether it's more painful than bitterly amusing to watch.

Check out Dick Cavett on Imus's return to the air. Isn't he supposed to be the intellectual's intellectual? That's why I clicked on it, figuring that someone of Cavett's supposed candlepower would give me something to think about. But, alas, the entire post is so embarrassingly silly, or should be, it's hard to pick out the dumbest nuggets, but let's try, shall we?

There's no getting around what he said, of course, but it's worth asking under what circumstances would a man ever be justified in calling a bunch of women — of any color — by the volatile term "hos"? The first requirement, really, would be that he would have to know them. How can an insult be personal if the person delivering it and the person(s) receiving it don't know each other? Imus would have had to meet the ladies and determine to his satisfaction that they were, um . . . how to say? . . . ladies of light virtue. And then he would have to decide to broadcast the authenticated fact. And what on earth would have to be in his mind were he to do that?

Wow. "There's no getting around what he said" but there should have been no backlash. And note the replacement of rac- and sexism with the much more user-friendly "personal insult;" power is nothing if not sneaky and manipulative in shrouding itself. A statement can't be rac- or sexist - my bad, insulting - unless it's utterer had actual knowledge of his target's moral status. Hmmm, sorta leaves out the part where the very essence of rac- or sexism is negative essentializations based on demeaning the Other. As for what would "have to be on his mind?" how 'bout white supremacy? It's unthinkable that his buddy is racist, therefore, he isn't, no matter what he says. And, then there's this:

At the risk of seeming class-conscious, whenever I've appeared with Imus, the folks who mentioned seeing me were certainly . . . well . . . is there a nice way of saying "well above average"?

Anyone? Anyone? Is there?

There are worthy arguments to be made in support of Imus then and his return to the air now. This includes none of them.

At least there's one thing Cavett and I can agree on re Imus: "A lot of people did not come off well." Neither did their IQs. Good thing I have no actual knowledge of whether Dick Cavett is a...never mind.

Bush White House Guided Military to Develop Nuclear Strike Plans Against Rogue States, FAS Finds

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 10:30 AM EST

The Federation of American Scientists' director of the nuclear information project Hans Kristensen reports that he has gotten ahold of a surprising document that shows the Bush White House guided the US military to change the US nuclear posture in 2002 to develop nuclear strike plans against rogue states, including North Korea, Iran and Iraq.

"Everybody got so afraid of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and terrorists and the combination of the two that White House guidance ordered the military to prepare nuclear strike plans against them," Kristensen tells me in a phone interview Monday. "This particular document is the main surprise here. It is a briefing that that US strategic command held sometime in 2002 which is about national nuclear war plans that went into effect in March 2003. Since then, there has been only upgrade of the plan."

Kristensen says the document he got hold of is a compilation of slides, 126 pages. "They only released 23 of those, and most of that is heavily redacted," Kristensen says. "But one thing they surprisingly let through is the identification of new strike plans against rogue states. And this is a surprise. ... This shows nuclear strike planning rose all the way to the top, the national strategic war plan, a new development."

Crazy Like a Mother

| Mon Nov. 5, 2007 9:14 AM EST

Now, the Nebraska teacher who was having sex with her sixth-grader has cost herself prison and him the good life in America. Turns out he's an illegal immigrant from Mexico and, having fled with him there, he's now stuck. What's love got to do with it? Everything. Maybe women should do some re-thinking about their school girl notions of love and romance and how entitled to them they are. Maybe we should do that before we cross the line into child abuse and violence. Like Nowak, I don't have much sympathy for Peterson, however much in love she thinks she is, however well she treated him. She's turned this child from a munchkin who should be playing X Box too much into a smooth operator. She's his "Baby Gurl" and -- check this -- he defends their relationship as "[not just] about the sex but that it was pretty good."

"Pretty good"? That's how he should be rating the latest Simpson's episode, not sex. What little benefit of the doubt I had for her, sure she believed herself in love and wasn't a habitual abuser, evaporated. Perspective restored. The great sex guru Dan Savage frequently reminds the older partner in a sexual relationship to treat the younger one like a campsite -- left better than when found. There's simply no way for an adult to accomplish that with a sixth grader.