Blogs

The New York Sun's Ethnic Paranoia

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 7:53 PM EDT

Following up on the talk of Rudy Giuliani as "the New York Sun candidate," the Sun editorial board complained this morning about "[a] new epithet … in use on the left in respect of Mayor Giuliani—namely that he has been 'fostering a climate of ethnic paranoia.'" The "left" here is Talking Points Memo's Josh Marshall, who first used the offending phrase, and the Atlantic's Matthew Yglesias, who repeated it. Both references to "ethnic paranoia" occurred in discussions of Rudy's group of radical foreign policy advisers, several of whom harbor Islamophobic, Israel-centric world views. The Sun notes:

Yglesias quotes Joshua Marshall as saying of Mr. Giuliani that "the guy has no real sense that posturing and pandering to ethnic paranoia in New York City simply isn't the same as running a national foreign policy."

And then wonders, coyly:

What are New Yorkers to make of this idea of "ethnic paranoia"? To what — or to whom — are Messrs. Marshall and Yglesias referring? Ethnic New Yorkers? Ethnic Americans? Well, go figure...

Of course, the ethnic group Yglesias and Marshall are referring to is the American-Jewish community, specifically in New York City. And the Sun's charge, as Marshall noted today, is that he and Yglesias, "two Jews, are peddling some sort of subtle anti-semitism." Coming from the Sun (once described as "a journalistic SWAT team against [those] seen as hostile to Israel and Jews"), this is no surprise. But what I find interesting about this episode is the Sun's inability to accept the neutral descriptor "ethnic" for American Jews. As it turns out, this principle is codified in the Sun's in-house style guide, which, as reported by the Observer, contains this notable entry: "Ethnic. Means not Jewish or Christian." Interesting. But click over to the American Heritage dictionary and you'll find the first, or preferred, entry on "ethnic" accommodates Jews quite nicely: "Of, relating to, or characteristic of a sizable group of people sharing a common and distinctive racial, national, religious, linguistic, or cultural heritage." The Sun's definition is from the second entry, reading in full: "Relating to a people not Christian or Jewish; heathen." Talk about ethnic paranoia.

—Justin Elliott

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Lights Out San Francisco

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 7:37 PM EDT

logo-dark.png Sydney led the way last March. San Francisco is going dark this Saturday night, October 20, from 8-9pm, to send a message on global warming:

Lights Out San Francisco is a citywide energy conservation event on Oct. 20, 2007. On this night, we invite the entire city of San Francisco to install one compact fluorescent light bulb (CFL) and turn off all non-essential lighting for one hour.

Word has it that both bridges and the Transamerica Pyramid are on board, and many restaurants will offer candlelight dining. There's also a great party going on in Dolores Park. Drop by. . .

But why just one CFL? And why wait for your city to catch on? Join in from afar.

Julia Whitty is Mother Jones' environmental correspondent. You can read from her new book, The Fragile Edge, and other writings, here.

Lights Out San Francisco

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 7:33 PM EDT

logo-dark.png Sydney led the way last March. San Francisco is going dark this Saturday night, October 20, from 8-9pm, to send a message on global warming:

Lights Out San Francisco is a citywide energy conservation event on Oct. 20, 2007. On this night, we invite the entire city of San Francisco to install one compact fluorescent light bulb (CFL) and turn off all non-essential lighting for one hour.

Word has it that both bridges and the Transamerica Pyramid are on board, and many restaurants will offer candlelight dining. There's also a great party going on in Dolores Park. Drop by. . .

But why just one CFL? And why wait for your city to catch on? Join in from afar.

Julia Whitty is Mother Jones' environmental correspondent. You can read from her new book, The Fragile Edge, and other writings, here.

Republican Candidates Lukewarm On Global Warming

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 7:14 PM EDT

499870475_97db2f3e5b_m.jpg Interesting piece in today's New York Times on global warming as the new litmus test for Republican presidential wannabes:

While many conservative commentators and editorialists have mocked concerns about climate change, a different reality is emerging among Republican presidential contenders. It is a near-unanimous recognition among the leaders of the threat posed by global warming. Within that camp, however, sharp divisions are developing. Senator John McCain of Arizona is calling for capping gas emissions linked to warming and higher fuel economy standards. Others, including Rudolph W. Giuliani and Mitt Romney, are refraining from advocating such limits and are instead emphasizing a push toward clean coal and other alternative energy sources. All agree that nuclear power should be greatly expanded.

Reason enough to deny them the job, IMO.

Julia Whitty is Mother Jones' environmental correspondent. You can read from her new book, The Fragile Edge, and other writings, here.

Politics 2.0 Strikes Back

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 7:01 PM EDT

The July/August issue of Mother Jones roiled the blogosphere with an irreverent take on so-called Open-Source Politics. Web pundits inveighed against yet another print magazine (nevermind our blog and website) questioning the impact of Web 2.0 on political campaigning. A flash point in this flame war was the mock Wikipedia entry that we published in print and on our website. It claimed Open-Source Politics would "revolutionize our ability to follow, support, and influence political campaigns," but then wryly added: "And if you believe that, we've got some leftover Pets.com stock to sell you." Our goal was to mirror the way that Wikipedia and other Web 2.0 pages often get pranked, and slalom between extreme views, even as they move towards a middle ground and, hopefully, the truth. But the critics complained that our definition was a gimmick with little connection to the way Netizens actually thought of themselves.

At the time I wondered if the critics really spoke for the Web masses. Given that Web 2.0 is supposed to enshrine Web users (and not Web pundits) as the arbiters of truth, I decided to see what the Web actually thought about our mock Wiki. So in early July I posted our definition of OSP as an actual entry in Wikipedia. I cut only the Pets.com quip and the reference to Karl Rove, thinking that would get the entry booted. And then I waited. Three months have passed, and I think I can now say the results are in. Not only is my mock Wiki still the official entry for "Open Source Politics," it now comes up as the top hit for the term on Google.

There have been a few changes along the way. Most significantly, the entry is now titled "Open source political campaign" instead of "Open-source politics." But it still goes on to use "open-source politics" as the official term throughout and most of my original text is unchanged. The reference to "party bosses in smoky backrooms" was deleted, but the language about how Web 2.0 will "revolutionize our ability to follow, support, and influence political campaigns" still remains. It seems that what stuck our blogger critics as gimmicky hype strikes Wiki users as a pretty reasonable definition.

The other dramatic change to the entry is how official it now looks. Someone added a list of references that I'd cited, a bevy of links to ideas such as "open source governance," a table of contents, and a list of related terms under the header "see also." I should hope the page looks good, given that on Google it outranks every blog, outranks The Nation, Wired, MSNBC, and Slate, and yes, outranks Mother Jones (which ranks 14th in a search for the term). It's all quite frightening, or flattering, or humbling, depending on how you look at it.

Neato Viddys on the Intertubes: The B-52's

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 6:58 PM EDT

B-52s

Looking for tunes as part of a random "consulting" assignment led me to the B-52's today, reminding me how much I love them, although you really shouldn't need an excuse for that. Most people will know "Rock Lobster" and "Love Shack," but I was introduced to them by MTV after their 1986 album Bouncing off the Satellites (I was in the middle of Nebraska, how else was I supposed to have heard them?), so let's go backwards from there and look at some of their less-widely-known tracks.

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Acid Oceans Increasing Rapidly

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 6:55 PM EDT

438038944_33e08b7ddf_m.jpg We've known for a while that ocean acidification is a bad bad thing. Now new research into corals using boron isotopes indicates the world-ocean has become about one third of a pH unit more acid over the past fifty years, reports the Australian Research Council. The acidity is caused by a CO2 buildup in the atmosphere, which then dissolves into the oceans—a development likely to be lethal for animals with chalky skeletons, who just happen to comprise more than a third of the planet's marine life.

Apparently this acidification is now taking place over decades, rather than centuries, as originally predicted, and is happening even faster in the cooler waters of the Southern Ocean than in the tropics. Corals and plankton with chalky skeletons rely on sea water saturated with calcium carbonate to form their skeletons. As acidity intensifies, it becomes harder to form their skeletons. According to Ove Hoegh-Guldberg of the University of Queensland: "Analysis of coral cores shows a steady drop in calcification over the last 20 years. . . When CO2 levels in the atmosphere reach about 500 parts per million, you put calcification out of business in the oceans." Atmospheric CO2 is presently 385 ppm, up from 305 in 1960. "It isn't just the coral reefs which are affected—a large part of the plankton in the Southern Ocean, the coccolithophorids, are also affected. These drive ocean productivity and are the base of the food web which supports krill, whales, tuna and our fisheries. They also play a vital role in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which could break down."

More alarmingly, recent experiments along Australia's Great Barrier Reef show that red calcareous algae—the glue that binds reefs together in turbulent waters—actually begin to dissolve at higher CO2 levels. "The risk is that this may begin to erode the Great Barrier Reef at a grand scale," says Hoegh-Guldberg.

So exactly where are our leaders, those slackers? What the hell is more important to attend to than this?

Julia Whitty is Mother Jones' environmental correspondent. You can read from her new book, The Fragile Edge, and other writings, here.

Terror on the High Seas and the Future of Media

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 5:18 PM EDT

ps.jpg

Here's the update you've all been waiting for. New York media/celebrity gossip blog Gawker passes on a report that pirate attacks (yes) are up 14 percent this year. (Yes, pirates still exist. Now they have power boats and machine guns instead of corsairs and cannons. Yes, Mother Jones has covered pirates in the past. Basically, modern pirates are kind of like Dennis Kucinich: They might need to be taken more seriously, but they're just too amusing to really think critically about.) Anyway, is Nick Denton's Gawker the future of media? Old-media New York magazine investigates.

Raped by the Law

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 4:52 PM EDT

Your tax dollars at work—a judge in Philadelphia sent the word that crime, especially violent crime, against working girls is OK.

After a 20 year old prostitute and single mom met a man for sex at an agreed upon price; he was joined by three of his friends who proceeded to gang rape her, unprotected, at gunpoint. Thankfully, the fourth friend thought her tears might signal a tad bit of unwillingness and helped her escape. Imagine the bravery of that young girl filing charges. Too bad it was for nothing. According to Philly.com reporter Jill Porter, the judge "dropped all sex and assault charges. . .[and] instead held the defendant on the bizarre charge of armed robbery for—get this—"theft of services."

At that point, I reread the introductory paragraphs sure to find what I'd glossed over before—the judge had to be a woman. One of the first things you learn in Law School Crim is how much you, as a prosecutor, don't want women on your rape jury. "It could never happen to me, they seem to think: only stupid or immoral women get raped. Only those who asked for it, drinking, dressing slutty, sleeping around. Being all flirtatious and prettier than me." There's some deep, dark psychology there and this judge was filthy with it.

"Did she tell you she had another client before she went to report it?" Deni asked me yesterday when we met at a coffee shop. "I thought rape was a terrible trauma."
A case like this, she said—to my astonishment—"minimizes true rape cases and demeans women who are really raped."

Silly Pennsylvania legislature, defining "sex by force as rape."

Porter goes on to note that, "The defendant was charged in an identical incident involving a 23-year-old woman four days later." Refusing to let another victim face such robed contempt and stupidity, prosecutors refused to present the second case and Deni dismissed it for failure to prosecute, with Church Lady gusto, no doubt.

Since he's only 19, and I watch Law and Order SVU, I'm betting that Judge Deni will be seeing lots more of this defendant as his rage against women escalates.

Must be read to be believed.

The Onion Gets It Right Again

| Wed Oct. 17, 2007 3:24 PM EDT

They got Iraq right. Now another bold prediction:


Poll: Bullshit Is Most Important Issue For 2008 Voters

Stay tuned to MoJo Blog and MotherJones.com for lots of non-bullshit news and analysis about subjects (Blackwater, Iraq, race, health care, actual policy controversies) that aren't nearly as important as John Edward's haircut or Hillary Clinton's gender.