Blogs

Clinton Fake Question "Scandal": A Report From the Scene

| Wed Nov. 14, 2007 10:04 AM EST

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One of the "major" news stories on the presidential campaigns the last few days has been Hillary Clinton's mini-scandal over a planted question at a campaign event in Newton, IA. As Michael Scherer points out in Salon, a planted question is really just par for the course in a political campaign season captured, top to bottom, by artifice.

I was at the event in Newton. And the event there perfectly illustrates the fakery that composes every event for a major candidate. Believe me, it goes well beyond just one planted question. Follow me on a tour of a presidential campaign event, after the jump.

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IslamoHorowitzism Awareness Week

| Wed Nov. 14, 2007 9:24 AM EST

Before David Horowitz began warning America about the dangers of communism in the eighties, he spent years fervently celebrating communists during the sixties.

So it's no surprise that before he began warning us all about the dangers of "Islamofascism," he spent years fervently celebrating Islamofascists. Below is a picture of Horowitz from a 1986 Mother Jones profile. As you can see, his t-shirt reads "Support Afghan Freedom Fighters." There's also a sketch of a man holding an assault rifle who looks vaguely like Osama bin Laden.

Currently Horowitz runs the David Horowitz Freedom Center. Look for his angry denunciations of his current dupes and fellow travelers circa 2027.

Breaking: Blackwater Operators Violated 'Use of Deadly Force' Rules

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 11:25 PM EST

According to the New York Times, FBI investigators have concluded that at least 14 of 17 Iraqis killed by Blackwater operators in a Baghdad traffic circle on September 16 were victims of unlawful shootings. The Times story is based on information from civilian and military officials recently briefed on the case. Full story here.

I Don't Want to Be 16 Again

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 10:06 PM EST
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Thanks to Labrador Records bands like the Mary Onettes and the Radio Dept., I feel like I'm back in high school again. Problem is, I'm not sure if this is a good thing.

The Mary Onettes' 2007 self-titled debut release sounds a lot like bands I loved when I was 16—New Order, the Church, the Smiths, the Cult, the Jesus and Mary Chain, and the Cure, to name a few. I even heard hints of the Fixx in there. I was loving the CD until suddenly it hit me: It was a little too familiar. Where are the new ideas here, folks? I even checked the back of the CD to make sure it wasn't a reissue or something. Nope, this stuff is vintage 2007.

As much as I'm willing to let a band take me back to the doom and gloom of a lot of 80s post-punk and new wave, I can only enjoy it so much. Haven't we borrowed from that decade enough? I went to my first 80s club night in 1991; the decade had barely ended and we were already glamorizing it! I had a short attention span for 80s nostalgia then, and it's only gotten shorter.

I like the Radio Dept. I also like the Strokes, and for that matter, bands like Bloc Party, Franz Ferdinand, and Broken Social Scene; all of whom, in my opinion, borrow bits and pieces of 80s flair. But my interest in music like this is waning because it's overdone, and I'd rather hear something new and creative. What are some of these musicians actually saying and thinking when they're sitting in a rehearsal space writing new material? Are they like, "Let's do that one drum beat that New Order does in most of their early songs," or "This is how Robert Smith would have done it!" The Mary Onettes' music is so eerily familiar that I wouldn't be half surprised if that's exactly how the conversation went.

Bill Clinton and Richard Mellon Scaife Do Lunch

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 2:19 PM EST

The Clintons' (highly successful) campaign to win over their worst enemies from the '90s continues. Hillary has already bagged Rupert Murdoch, and now Bill's got Richard Mellon Scaife.

Al Gore: Venture Capitalist

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 2:08 PM EST

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No one really still thinks Al Gore is going to run for president (hair's too long, waistline too expansive). But here's one more signal that he's not running: Gore yesterday announced that he's joining a prestigious venture capital firm in Silicon Valley, where he'll direct investments that help combat global warming.

Despite the green-sounding job description, and promises from the firm that Gore would be an "active" partner, it's hard to imagine Gore will be doing much to save the world there. After all, when would he find the time? He also serves on the board of Apple, he's a senior adviser to Google and has a pretty extensive public speaking schedule. No doubt he'll be out campaigning for a candidate or two this year as well. The new job does, however, offer something his nonprofit climate change group doesn't: stock options, which Gore apparently needs after a lifetime in public service.

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Tancredo Go Boom

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 1:09 PM EST

I actually laughed out loud at the end of this, which means I either hate America or the cartoonish presidential candidates on the fringes have really upped the ante. Mike Gravel, what say you?

Sympathy for the Drivel

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 12:42 PM EST

With all the articles that have been written about the TV writers' strike (how crappy the signs are, Eva Longoria's strike breaking, neonatal guild members birthed onto the picket line, career-change opportunities for Hollywood hacks, and Dowd's space filling), no attention has so far been paid to the real victims here. "I shudder to think what's happening to all the kids who keep in touch with world news by listening to reports of late-night comedians," some guy told Dowd portentiously. The kids? 'Excuse me while I whip this out: Screw the future. That's right. Bump them and focus on the least fortunate in all this, those ugly, peg-legged fawns baying bravely in a media forest aflame with irrelevance and starlets' lady parts. Without late night satire, where do minor league, one-issue wanna-pundits like myself go to rent ourselves five minutes at the 'popular' table? A very bad thing has happened to good blow hards.

Thompson's Fancy Footwork Wins Him Right-To-Life Crown

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 12:14 PM EST

Fred Thompson has chutzpah.

In a campaign press release hailing his endorsement by the National Right To Life Committee, Thompson declared:

In supporting me, those who have worked tirelessly to defend life are supporting a consistent conservative who has stood with them yesterday, who stands with them today, and will stand with them tomorrow.

The press release went on to say,

Fred Thompson is pro-life. He believes in the sanctity of human life and that every life is worthy of respect. He had a 100% pro-life voting record in the Senate and believes Roe v. Wade was a bad decision that ought to be overturned. He consistently opposed federal funding to promote or pay for abortion.

What about his days as a lawyer-lobbyist when Thompson aided abortion rights groups trying to persuade the administration of President George H.W. Bush to ease restrictions on federal payments to health clinics that offered (among other services) abortion counseling? When The Los Angeles Times broke this story in July, Thompson's campaign first denied he had done anything such thing. But as records surfaced showing he had helped the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association, Thompson claimed he was merely doing his duty as a lawyer:

The practice of law is a business as well as a profession. It's the way you support your family. And if a client has a legal and ethical right to take a position, then you may appropriately represent him as long as he does not lie or otherwise conduct himself improperly while you are representing him. In almost 30 years of practicing law I must have had hundreds of clients and thousands of conversations about legal matters. Like any good lawyer, I would always try to give my best, objective, and professional opinion on any legal question presented to me.

But no lawyer is obligated to work for a client he finds morally reprehensible. Thompson certainly had the right to tell his law firm that he would prefer not to assist a group advocating abortion rights (or, as the anti-abortion crowd puts it, the right to commit mass-murder). He chose to put the code of business above a moral concern. That was his prerogative. What's wrong is how he has tried (and succeeded) in double-talking his way out of a predicament. He worked for this abortion rights group, then ran for Senate as an anti-abortion candidate. When the story came out about his pro-abortion toils, his campaign issued a false denial. After incontrovertible proof emerged, he hid behind his duty as a lawyer. After all that, Thompson ends up with the right-to-life crown.

It's a tale of contortions. But look at the GOP field. One of the leading candidates is a supporter of abortion rights trying to convince the anti-abortion crowd he's not that pro-choice (Rudy Giuliani). Another is a former supporter of abortion rights attempting to persuade potential Republican voters he has been converted (Mitt Romney). And a third once railed against the leaders of the religious right and has tried to mend fences with the social conservatives (John McCain). So Thompson's pirouettes are not much in comparison. In the land of GOP contortions, Thompson's dance is about as straightforward as they come.

Upscale Buenos Aires Shopping Mall Once Housed Torture Chambers

| Tue Nov. 13, 2007 10:23 AM EST

For anyone who ever suspected there's something less pleasant lurking under shopping mall muzak, Naomi Klein's new book The Shock Doctrine provides confirmation, in the chapter about the 1976-83 dirty war in Argentina:

In 1987, a film crew was shooting in the basement of the Galerias Pacifico, one of Buenos Aires' plushest downtown malls, and to their horror they stumbled on an abandoned torture center. It turned out that during the dictatorship, the First Army Corp hid some of its disappeared in the bowels of the mall; the dungeon walls still bore the desperate markings made by its long-dead prisoners: names, dates, pleas for help.
Today, Galerias Pacifico is the crown jewel of Buenos Aires' shopping district, evidence of its arrival as a globalized consumer capital. Vaulted ceilings and lushly painted frescoes frame the vast array of brand-name stores, from Christian Dior to Ralph Lauren to Nike...
For Argentines who know their history, the mall stands as a chilling reminder that just as an older form of capitalist conquest was built on the mass graves of the country's indigenous peoples, the Chicago School Project in Latin America was quite literally built on the secret torture camps where thousands of people who believed in a different country disappeared.

The Galerias Pacifico website is here. As of today, this information has not been added to the mall's English-language wikipedia page.