I Thought Bob Novak Had Gone Away?

He retired back in August, but for some reason he's back, spinning like always.

Here's what he said in 2004, when asked if Bush's victory over Kerry was a mandate from voters:

"Of course it is. It's a 3.5 million vote margin."

And here's what he wrote yesterday about Obama's victory over McCain:

"...he neither received a broad mandate from the public nor the needed large congressional majorities."

Of course, Obama is on pace to win by over 7 million votes. He won more electoral votes than Bush in 2004 and will have larger congressional majorities. This is the definition of hackery. Why on earth people continue to publish Novak, especially drawing him out of retirement to do so, is beyond me. Hat tip Think Progress.

Oregon Comes Through: Dems Win Another Senate Seat

Oregon Speaker of the House Jeff Merkley has defeated moderate Republican incumbent Gordon Smith for Oregon's junior Senate seat, bumping the Dems' roster in the Senate to 57. For a rundown on where they are in Georgia, Minnesota, and Alaska, the three races still outstanding, click here. Below, an illustration of what Oregon looks like politically (courtesy of the Oregonian). Can you guess where Portland and Eugene are located?

oregon_redblue.jpg

You'd like to think it's something like command of the issues or the ability to inspire, right? Maybe it's just plain old cash. From the Center for Responsive Politics:

Continuing a trend seen election cycle after election cycle, the biggest spender was victorious in 397 of 426 decided House races and 30 of 32 settled Senate races [in 2008]. On Election Day 2006, top spenders won 94 percent of House races and 73 percent of Senate races. In 2004, 98 percent of House seats went to the biggest spender, as did 88 percent of Senate seats.

Of course, cash may be correlative instead of causative. That is, candidates that are better qualified, better on the issues, and better able to inspire voters raise more money than their opponents, and then go on to win.

Dishing on Palin

DISHING ON PALIN....Don't lie: you know you want to hear it. The presidential campaign has only been over for 24 hours, but that's all it's taken for two months of accumulated bitterness and rage from McCain staffers toward Sarah Palin to finally explode onto the news pages. For starters, here is John McCain's private opinion of Palin, as reported by the Guardian:

An exasperated McCain has been telling friends in recent weeks that Palin is even more trouble than a pitbull. In one joke doing the rounds, the Republican presidential candidate has been asking friends: what is the difference between Sarah Palin and a pitbull? The friendly canine eventually lets go, is the McCain punchline.

Here is the McCain campaign's take on Palin's clothing extravaganza, as reported by Newsweek:

Newsweek has also learned that Palin's shopping spree at high-end department stores was more extensive than previously reported. While publicly supporting Palin, McCain's top advisers privately fumed at what they regarded as her outrageous profligacy.....An angry aide characterized the shopping spree as "Wasilla hillbillies looting Neiman Marcus from coast to coast," and said the truth will eventually come out when the Republican Party audits its books.

And here are some "McCain staffers" explaining that Palin is not just a moron, but a bad-tempered moron, as reported by Fox's Carl Cameron:

There was great concern in the McCain campaign that Sarah Palin lacked the degree of knowledgeability necessary to be a running mate, a vice president, and a heartbeat away from the presidency. We're told by folks that she didn't know what countries were in NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, that being Canada, the US, and Mexico. We're told that she didn't understand that Africa was a continent rather than a country just in itself. A whole host of questions that caused serious problems about her knowledgeability. She got very angry at staff, thought that she was mishandled, was particularly angry about the way the Katie Couric interview went. She didn't accept preparation for that interview when the aides say that that was part of the problem. And that there were times where she was hard to control emotionally. There's talk of temper tantrums at bad news clippings.

Regarding the last report, Shep Smith asks the obvious question: "How could they end up with a running mate who doesn't know that Africa is a continent?" Cameron explains that the vetting process "was truncated."

Earlier today, I had in mind a post about Palin that would have started out by saying that I didn't think she was stupid, just completely uninterested in national policy issues prior to August 29th. Needless to say, I'm glad I didn't write that post.

Transition Planning

TRANSITION PLANNING....A regular reader emails a question:

When do we get to start spreading some clever lies about Bush's people trashing the White House before Obama moves in? You know, something like they reprogrammed all the computers so that the letter "B" appears backwards and colored red. We need to think up some really stupid stuff that Fox News will swallow hook, line and sinker.

No time like the present! Leave suggestions in comments.

McCain's Foreign Policy Advisor Fired Last Week?

Turns out that McCain campaign top foreign policy advisor Randy Scheunemann was fired last week. CNN:

Randy Scheunemann, a senior foreign policy adviser to John McCain, was fired from the Arizona senator's campaign last week for what one aide called "trashing" the campaign staff, three senior McCain advisers tell CNN.
One of the aides tells CNN that campaign manager Rick Davis fired Scheunemann after determining that he had been in direct contact with journalists spreading "disinformation" about campaign aides, including Nicolle Wallace and other officials.
"He was positioning himself with Palin at the expense of John McCain's campaign message," said one of the aides.
Senior campaign officials blame Schuenemann specifically for stories about the way Wallace and chief campaign strategist Steve Schmidt mishandled Palin's rollout — stories that the campaign says threw them off message in the critical final weeks of the campaign.
Another aide said McCain personally was "very disappointed by Randy," who worked for McCain for many years in the Senate.

It would have been nice if someone had noticed at the time, and astonishing that the McCain campaign didn't reveal this until now.

Update: This folllow-up report by CNN is even more curious:

In another sign of drama and disarray inside camp McCain, former campaign senior adviser Randy Scheunemann responded late Wednesday to CNN and insisted he was "not fired and never [have] been fired."
In addition, Michael Goldfarb, a McCain press aide and Scheunemann ally, also insisted he was not fired.
However, Goldfarb did concede that Scheunemann's campaign e-mail was cut off, and his blackberry was taken away late Friday. Goldfarb admits that senior McCain aides were mad at Scheunemann, and wanted to fire him, but he insists they stopped short of that, and instead simply turned off his campaign communication.
Goldfarb says Scheunemann was in the office on Saturday. He was, however, noticeably missing on election night when top aides to John McCain and Sarah Palin gathered in Phoenix, Arizona.

So, his campaign email was shut off and his Blackberry was taken away. Does that sound like he was fired in all but name?


More Senate News

MORE SENATE NEWS....The Portland Oregonian reports that Jeff Merkley has won the Senate race there. That's +6 for the Democrats.

Rahm Emanuel

RAHM EMANUEL....The New York Times reports that Barack Obama has asked Rep. Rahm Emanuel to be his chief of staff. Ezra Klein is ambivalent about this:

If you thought the Obama administration would be all about bringing people together and would simply make sad faces when stubborn congressmen refused to come to the table, this is a clear sign otherwise. If good feelings don't suffice, bareknuckle politics will happily be employed.

But part of Emanuel's job will be to advise on what is politically possible. And he has always portrayed himself as a hard-headed realist on such matters, with a late-term Clintonite's allergy to ambition. In his book The Plan, Emanuel warns Democrats away from attempting universal health insurance or comprehensive reform, and suggests they content themselves with expanding S-CHIP (he also gives a plug to his brother, Ezekiel Emanuel's, health care plan, but says his "plan is well beyond Washington's current reach."). That's not change we can believe in.

Noted without comment since I don't really know anything about this. I just thought it was worth passing along.

UPDATE: Conservative Yuval Levin has a different take:

The White House chief of staff is not a chief strategist or a chief advocate. He is a manager of people and of process. Above all else, he sets the tone internally, and shapes the president's decision process and the feel of the upper tiers of the administration.....[Obama] will need a chief of staff with a sense of the gravity of the choices the president faces, and one capable of moving the staff to decision, keeping big egos satisfied and calm, and resisting the pressure to be purely reactive to momentary distractions. None of this spells Rahm Emanuel. There is definitely a place for a Rahm Emanuel type of brilliant ruthless shark in a White House staff, but not in the Chief's office.

This jibes with my understanding of the CoS position too. But what do I know?

2012

2012....I'd like to be the first pundit to go on record predicting the result of the 2012 election. I project that Barack Obama will crush his Republican opponent and win the popular vote by 10 percentage points. You heard it here first.

While there was much to enjoy during television election coverage last night, from even Juan Williams on Fox News and Stephen Colbert getting weepy to Chris Matthews desperately trying to hold back from calling the thing at 8pm EST, there was nothing more ridiculous than CNN's new "holographic" technology. At a seemingly nail-biting moment, with results starting to trickle in, Wolf Blitzer stopped everything to announce something "never before seen on television": a live shot of a reporter "beamed in" to the studio from a tent in Grant Park. Of course, Wolf couldn't really see her, so it wasn't really a hologram (that's why I'm using so many quotes), it was more like an highly-coordinated multi-camera green-screen, similar to the 1st and Ten system for football games. But that didn't stop them from talking about it for what seemed like 17 hours. Wolf and Anderson seemed most excited about using the hologram system to isolate reporters from the noisy crowds, apparently not understanding that they were still using the same old microphones and it was the tent that was keeping the crowds at bay.

So, CNN, you've spent untold billions of dollars on this technology, what are you going to do with it next? Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Virtual Will.I.Am from the Black Eyed Peas, who wandered into the tent and got himself Tron-i-fied. "We're at an eve of a brand new day," he declared, flickeringly, but then immediately turned to more important matters: "All this technology, I'm being beamed to you, like in Star Wars and stuff?" Watch what Vulture called a "momentous" appearance after the jump.