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Chris Rock(s) 2008

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 6:22 PM EDT

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Mother Jones Makes Chicago Tribune's Annual 50 Favorite Magazines List

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 5:37 PM EDT

Hot(tish) off the Chicago Tribune presses, their list of the magazines they consider to be the best in the country.

"Every year we ask each other what periodicals we've been reading, and then we ask you. Every year we argue about what makes a good magazine and why we rush to pick up certain titles or swipe them from a neighbor's desk. We urge each other to try something new, and we smack our foreheads when a title bubbles up that we'd completely missed."

"...Mother Jones. As well-written, at its best, as anything out there (check out the story on the guy who gets 60 miles per gallon in a plain old Honda Accord), Mother Jones is a lot better than we remembered. Unabashedly liberal but more entertaining than the Nation and journalistically oriented but more passionate than the news weeklies, it fills a need we didn't know we had."

They like us, they really, really like us! We're one of only six mags given a shout-out in the news/business/point of view category. And if you're into who got dissed—and there are some most notable exceptions—I've pasted the whole list in after the jump.

Coming Soon: Beck Beer, TV on the Radio "Staring at the Sun" Brand Tequila, M.I.A.'s Super Premium Hard Lemonade?

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 5:37 PM EDT

mojo-photo-afiabsinthe.jpgAnybody thirsty? Billboard.biz reports that Interscope Records has just entered an agreement with Drinks Americas to "develop various drink products" with Interscope artists. The oddly-named Drinks Americas (I guess they're including Central and South?) currently produces tasty beverages like Donald Trump's Super Premium Vodka and Willie Nelson's Old Whiskey River Bourbon, and I can't imagine buying either of them. Okay maybe Willie's whiskey.

Now, we've already seen a hot Bay Area hip-hop style get its own energy beverage, but the mind reels at the co-branding opportunities that could emerge from this deal. The label's roster includes mainstream hitmakers like Fergie, Enrique Iglesias and 50 Cent, as well as critical favorites like Feist, Wolfmother, and even Simian Mobile Disco. You can find their complete list of artists here; post your own ideas for artist-themed beverages in the comments, and if you're lucky, maybe you'll see them soon at your neighborhood 7-11.

American Film Institue Releases their Top 100 Films of All Time

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 5:10 PM EDT

Last week, the American Film Institute released their latest top 100 American films of all time. While it is arguable that the list is a marketing ploy since it is accompanied by promotions from AOL, Best Buy and Moviefone, it at least brings attention to some great films that younger generations have yet to see.

All my favorite critics weighed in with their takes on the list with Jim Emerson celebrating the arrival of Nashville on the list, Keith Phillips over at the A.V. Club pointing out that the list "kinda sucked," and Roger Ebert stating "lists like these cry out to be disagreed with." So, in the spirit of dissent, let me jump into the fray of film geeks with opinions.

What bothers me most about this list is that the ballot of 400 movies from which to select is predetermined, and although I have combed AFI's website, I still can't figure out who gets to decide which movies make it onto the ballot. But, despite making it onto the ballot, even great movies like Fargo and The Third Man were bumped as lesser movies (as far as this film geek is concerned) such as The Sixth Sense arrived on the list.

Notably absent from the list were any movies by David Lynch, The Coen Brothers, Jim Jarmusch, or Terrence Malick, all directors who have made films essential to gaining a complete picture of American cinema. But the list isn't all bad. This year, the list includes more silent films, which were mostly ignored in the first list AFI put out in 1998. All critique aside, the AFI's top 100 serves a purpose — it makes me want to go home and watch a movie, but if you are looking for a must-see list to get your cinefile on, I recommend this one. It is far more wide-ranging and (gasp) even has foreign films in the mix which the AFI list lacks as it limits itself to American films. Unlike every other comparable national film institution, the American Film Institute restricts its focus to films of its own nationality.

Go here to check out both the 1998 and 2007 lists and let your inner film geek out and tell us what you think about them!

—Martha Pettit

Neato Viddys on the Intertubes

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 4:57 PM EDT

No Top Ten this week since I was back home in Nebraska for the weekend (I'll have a posting on a snazzy new Omaha music venue later this week), but in the meantime enjoy some new music video clips, and one that's not so new but still very good.

Kanye West – "Stronger"
In which Kanye West invites Daft Punk (whose "Harder Better Faster Stronger" is sampled prominently) to watch him emerge from a weird EKG-looking machine in bulge-enhancing briefs, and then dance around in a denim vest and louvered sunglasses while Japanese subtitles explain it all

Yeah Yeah Yeahs – "Rockers to Swallow"
In which a leotard-sporting Karen O performs the band's new song (from Is Is, out July 23rd) in front of funhouse mirrors to an appreciative crowd, filmed by what appears to be surveillance cameras
Watch on Yahoo! Music here

Ali Love – "Secret Sunday Lover"
In which the young British singer (featured on the new Chemical Brothers single, "Do It Again") imagines himself in a kind of campy spy-slash-disco movie. He even gets the girl at the end

Interpol – "The Heinrich Maneuver"
In which director E. Elias Merhige portrays a surreal, slowed-down (and possibly reversed) Los Angeles street scene (apparently referencing the song's bitterness towards a West Coast ex-lover) complete with eye-rolling "surprise" ending which almost ruins it

Sonic Youth – "Teenage Riot"
The original video, in which the band perform the "hit" from their just-rereleased masterpiece Daydream Nation. Also featuring, um, everyone from Pee Wee Herman to Sun Ra

Cheney Smackdown

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 4:26 PM EDT

cheney_short_of_breath.jpg

Dick Cheney has claimed that his office is not subject to National Security Archives oversight of its handling of classified information because the vice president, as president of the Senate, is not part of the executive branch. Yet, to avoid public scrutiny of his meetings with energy industry leaders, Cheney declared that going public "would unconstitutionally interfere with the functioning of the executive branch." Question 1: Does this contempt for the constitution violate Cheney's promise to uphold the same document?

Cheney apparently considers himself his own special branch of government, outside the requirements of democracy—and perversely, he may just have a point. The report by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (more here) reveals that outsourcing of government responsibilities to private contractors is "the fastest growing component of federal discretionary spending." And Halliburton, the company Cheney once led and from which he continues to receive payment, has taken the lion's share of the growing business. Halliburton saw a six-fold increase in its income from government contracts under the VP—err, Senate President's watch. Question 2: Is this ethical?

So maybe the Dark Lord's ultimate agenda is simply personal greed. ThinkProgress points out that Cheney's stock options are worth more than 300 times more now than they were at the start of his second term. By contrast, the taxpayers have not profited from the arrangement. The House report concludes that 118 contracts—worth $745.5 billion—"experienced significant overcharges, wasteful spending, or mismanagement." Question 3: How is this not impeachable?

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Blogger Hubris 2.0

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 4:21 PM EDT

I've enjoyed reading the insightful blogger responses to Mother Jones' "Fight Different" package on internet politics. I've also enjoyed the less insightful ones. I was particularly entertained by this morning's post on Techpresident, which is (usually) a smart group blog on everything politics 2.0. Techprez blogger Alan Rosenblatt has decided today that the mainstream media is too obsessed with his ilk (if he's flattered, it doesn't show) and that they're failing to look more broadly at "how the web is playing an enormous role in all aspects of politics." Singled out for specific calumny is our very own bastion of old thinking:

[A]fter reading so much mainstream press coverage about Politics 2.0 lately (for example, in Mother Jones this month), one might conclude that the sun rises and sets only on blogs and the bloggers that write them. There is so much more to online campaigning that we do ourselves a great disservice when we narrow our focus too much on blogs.

Thank you, Alan, for helping me understand why blog discourse often reduces to phrases such as "fucking dumbass."

If Alan had actually read the package, he'd see one story on bloggers out of four main pieces and 27 published interviews with netizens, digerati and politicos. Here's what Alan says Mother Jones is missing, which, since he's too lazy to look for himself, I've conveniently linked to stories in the package that deal with each subject: "the web is playing an enormous role in all aspects of politics, including fundraising, volunteer organizing, message dissemination, and voter engagement through social networks and social media." That's brilliant, Alan. Thanks for letting us know.

The most interesting thing about the Techpresident post is how it illustrates the blogosphere as echo chamber. Some bloggers earn their soup by setting up the old media as a paper doll to be burned, which works fine as long as nobody reads the old media to see what they're actually saying and nobody in the old media reads the blogs and bothers to debunk them when they're wrong. Fortunately, I see some light at the end of the tunnel here. For one, Mother Jones has a blog (hi, Alan!) and we can tinkle on logos just like the Calvinists.

All of this is not to say that Techpresident is a lame blog. I'm glad that Techprez blogger Cfinnie linked to my interview with Howard Dean (thanks, Cfinnie!). Too bad Alan doesn't read his colleagues either.

PS: I want to include a link to the blog of Seth Finkelstein, who is quite well-informed about many of the same issues we are discussing here and in the blog post on Rosen. I highly suggest following the links he's pasted into the comments below, and in his post. Also see our post from Dan Schulman for discussion about gatekeepers.

Rewarding Polluters Fuels Gulf Of Mexico Dead Zone

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 4:04 PM EDT

A new study determines that U.S. taxpayers are subsidizing the Gulf of Mexico dead zone. This is an area of coastal waters -- visited in MoJo's The Fate Of The Ocean -- where dissolved-oxygen concentrations fall to less than 2 parts per million every summer. According to a paper published at Environmental Science & Technology Online, these findings bode poorly for the Gulf, as more and more acres of land are planted with corn to meet the growing U.S. demand for alternative fuels.

Scientists studying nutrient inputs that feed the Gulf's hypoxic zone have known that certain intensively farmed areas in the upper Midwest leak more nitrogen derived from fertilizers than others. Now, there's a new twist. Farmers in areas with the highest rates of fertilizer runoff tend to receive the biggest payouts in federal crop subsidies, says Mary Booth, lead author of the paper. What's more, they have fewer acres enrolled in conservation programs compared with other parts of the Mississippi River basin. Booth maintains that agricultural nitrate loading could be reduced substantially if farmers took just 3% of the most intensively farmed land out of production. Accomplishing this target, she adds, wouldn't require a large increase in overall federal funding, but monies would have to be shifted from commodity to conservation programs under the Farm Bill set to expire in September.

Hey, a little citizen outrage via email here and here might make a difference on this one. . . --JULIA WHITTY

World Wildlife Fund Opposes Iron Dumping In Ocean

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 3:03 PM EDT

The World Wildlife Fund announced its opposition to a plan by the for-profit Planktos, Inc. to dump up to 100 tons of iron dust in the open ocean west of the Galapagos Islands. The experiment is designed to produce phytoplankton blooms that may absorb carbon dioxide. The American company is speculating on lucrative ways to combat climate change. But WWF spokespersons say there are safer and more proven ways of preventing or lowering carbon dioxide levels, and that the real risks in this experiment could cause a domino effect throughout the food web.

Potential negative impacts of the Planktos experiment include: shifts in the natural species composition of plankton; gases released by the large amount of phytoplankton blooms; bacterial decay following the induced blooms and the resulting anoxia, leading to a potential dead zone in the area; the introduction of large amounts of impure (but cost-effective) iron to the ecosystem, tainted by other trace metals toxic to marine life.

The waters around the Galapagos are rich with 400 species of fish, as well as sea turtles, penguins, marine iguanas, sperm whales, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, crabs, anemones, sponges and corals. Many of these animals are found nowhere else on earth. Planktos, Inc. plans to dump the iron in international waters using vessels neither flagged under the United States nor leaving from the U.S., so federal regulations such as the U.S. Ocean Dumping Act don't apply and details don't need to be disclosed to U.S. entities.

Take note: a new form of piracy is born. Science piracy on the high seas. Isn't Sea Shepherd in the area right about now? Calling the good Pirate, I mean, Captain Paul Watson . . .

BTW, here's a good example of the media getting it all wrong:

--JULIA WHITTY


Waste in Federal Contracts Now More Than $1 Trillion

| Wed Jun. 27, 2007 2:08 PM EDT

Last year California Rep. Henry Waxman released an in-depth report on government-contract spending under the Bush Administration. It found that:


  • Between 2000 and 2005, federal procurement spending rose by over 80%.
  • No-bid and other contracts awarded without full and open competition increased by more than 100%.
  • Contract mismanagement led to rising waste, fraud, and abuse in federal contracting.
  • Today Waxman released this year's analysis, which shows that what was already bad has actually gotten much worse.


  • For the first time EVER the federal government has passed $400 billion threshold in contracts for the year.
  • More than half of this spending — more than $200 billion in new contracts — was awarded without full and open competition.
  • The total value of wasteful federal contracts now exceeds $1 trillion.
  • Get the full rundown, and have a look at specific contracts, here.