No Maple Syrup by 2100?

| Thu Jan. 5, 2012 10:43 AM PST

Martha Carlson, Sandwich N.H.: James WestMartha Carlson, Sandwich N.H. James West

A few years ago, Martha Carlson, a veteran maple farmer, began noticing subtle changes in her 60-acre "sugar bush" in Sandwich, New Hampshire: Maple sap was unusually dark, and leaves were falling too early, never having reached postcard New England color. Her sugar maples, some of them nearly 300 years old, were sick.

At 65, Martha now leads the crusade to save the New Hampshire sugar maples—and the multimillion dollar local syrup and tourism industries they provide—from disastrous climate change. And in the process she's mobilizing a crack team of researchers: a group of elementary school kids.

Take a peak at the Climate Desk's slideshow of production stills from New Hampshire on Facebook (and make sure to like our page). We're also on Google Plus. Front page image: Adam Rose/Flickr

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