Blue Marble

Plants Uptake Antibiotics

Routine feeding of antibiotics to livestock may be contaminating the world of plants. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have evaluated whether food crops accumulate antibiotics from soils spread with manure that contains antibiotics. Plant uptake was evaluated in a greenhouse study involving three food crops: corn, lettuce, and potato. Plants were grown on soil modified with liquid hog manure containing Sulfamethazine, a commonly...

| Wed Jul. 11, 2007 3:25 PM EDT

Routine feeding of antibiotics to livestock may be contaminating the world of plants. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have evaluated whether food crops accumulate antibiotics from soils spread with manure that contains antibiotics. Plant uptake was evaluated in a greenhouse study involving three food crops: corn, lettuce, and potato. Plants were grown on soil modified with liquid hog manure containing Sulfamethazine, a commonly used veterinary antibiotic. This antibiotic was taken up by all three crops. Concentrations of antibiotics were found in the plant leaves. Concentrations in plant tissue also increased as the amount of antibiotics present in the manure increased. It also diffused into potato tubers, which suggests that root crops, such as potatoes, carrots, and radishes, that directly come in contact with soil may be particularly vulnerable to antibiotic contamination. JULIA WHITTY

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Organic Farming Can Feed The World

Organic farming can yield up to three times as much food as conventional farming on the same amount of land. A new study from the University of Michigan refutes the long-standing assumption that organic farming methods can't produce enough food to feed the global population. The researchers found that yields in developed countries were almost equal between organic and conventional farms, while food production...

| Wed Jul. 11, 2007 3:01 PM EDT

Organic farming can yield up to three times as much food as conventional farming on the same amount of land. A new study from the University of Michigan refutes the long-standing assumption that organic farming methods can't produce enough food to feed the global population. The researchers found that yields in developed countries were almost equal between organic and conventional farms, while food production in developing countries could double or triple by going organic. The study also found that equal or greater yields could be accomplished using existing quantities of organic fertilizers, and without putting more farmland into production. Ivette Perfecto, of U-M's School of Natural Resources and Environment, said the idea that people would go hungry if farming went organic is ridiculous. "Corporate interest in agriculture and the way agriculture research has been conducted in land grant institutions, with a lot of influence by the chemical companies and pesticide companies as well as fertilizer companies—all have been playing an important role in convincing the public that you need to have these inputs to produce food," she said. JULIA WHITTY

Want To Broadcast To Fox News?

Anxious to talk to Fox in language they understand? (Clearly they fail science-speak.) Try dollar-speak. There's enough of us &mdash the 7 out of 10 Americans who know human-caused climate change is real &mdash to get their attention. Check it out. JULIA WHITTY...

| Tue Jul. 10, 2007 9:31 PM EDT

Anxious to talk to Fox in language they understand? (Clearly they fail science-speak.) Try dollar-speak. There's enough of us &mdash the 7 out of 10 Americans who know human-caused climate change is real &mdash to get their attention. Check it out.

JULIA WHITTY


Weird Weather Watch: Omnibus Edition

It snowed in Buenos Aires for the first time in 90 years yesterday. (The good news is, it is winter in the southern hemisphere.) Meanwhile, the East Coast of the United States is sweltering in 90-plus degree heat with high humidity to boot. A similar heat wave last year killed 40. It's hot out West, too. The heat is fueling a wildfire burning 35,000...

| Tue Jul. 10, 2007 5:03 PM EDT

It snowed in Buenos Aires for the first time in 90 years yesterday. (The good news is, it is winter in the southern hemisphere.)

Meanwhile, the East Coast of the United States is sweltering in 90-plus degree heat with high humidity to boot. A similar heat wave last year killed 40.

It's hot out West, too. The heat is fueling a wildfire burning 35,000 acres of forest in the Sierras and another incinerating nearly 10,000 acres in Los Padres National Forest. Another major blaze covers nearly 100 square miles in Nevada. Less rain and more heat across the Southwest are to blame for the region's increasing susceptibility to wildfire.

Australia To Build Cross-Continent Corridor For Wildlife

Australia will create a wildlife corridor spanning the continent to allow animals and plants to flee the effects of global warming. Reuters reports that the 1,740 mile climate "spine," approved by state and national governments, will link the country's entire east coast, from the snow-capped Australian alps in the south to the tropical north Queensland. "A lot of that forest and vegetation spine is...

| Mon Jul. 9, 2007 7:47 PM EDT

Australia will create a wildlife corridor spanning the continent to allow animals and plants to flee the effects of global warming. Reuters reports that the 1,740 mile climate "spine," approved by state and national governments, will link the country's entire east coast, from the snow-capped Australian alps in the south to the tropical north Queensland. "A lot of that forest and vegetation spine is already there. But there are still blockages," David Lindenmayer, a professor of conservation biology, told Reuters. Climate scientists have predicted temperatures rising by up to 12 degrees Fahrenheit by 2080 in the country's vast outback interior. The corridor will link national parks, state forests and government land, and help preserve scores of endangered species. . . For an in-depth look at plans for similar corridors in the U.S., check out the work of the Wildlands Project in Gone, in the May/June 2007 issue of MoJo. JULIA WHITTY

Dutch Bike Ridership Increasing

The distance the average Dutch person bicycles every day has increased by nearly 10 percent in the past five years. This in a nation already renowned for its love of bikes, says the Environmental News Network in an AP story. Holland's Central Bureau for Statistics, accounting for every woman, man, and child in the country, reports the Dutch rode an average of 1.5 miles...

| Mon Jul. 9, 2007 7:15 PM EDT

The distance the average Dutch person bicycles every day has increased by nearly 10 percent in the past five years. This in a nation already renowned for its love of bikes, says the Environmental News Network in an AP story. Holland's Central Bureau for Statistics, accounting for every woman, man, and child in the country, reports the Dutch rode an average of 1.5 miles per person per day in 2006, more than 8.7 billion miles in all. The Dutch Biker's Union says increased bike usage is tied to increased traffic congestion around cities and the difficulty of finding parking places in city centers. The trend also reflects the growing popularity of bakfiets, bicycles with sturdy wooden boxes on the front capable of carrying loads of groceries or children up to 175 pounds. The Dutch are apparently also slimmer and healthier than Euro-neighbors thanks to their bike miles. JULIA WHITTY

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Climate Change The Root Of Armed Conflicts?

Climate change and its resultant shortage of ecological resources could be to blame for armed conflicts in the future. According to a paper published in Human Ecology, changing temperatures and dwindling agricultural production correlated with warfare frequency in eastern China in the past. The authors reviewed warfare data from 899 wars in eastern China between 1000 and 1911, and cross-referenced these data with Northern...

| Mon Jul. 9, 2007 5:53 PM EDT

Climate change and its resultant shortage of ecological resources could be to blame for armed conflicts in the future. According to a paper published in Human Ecology, changing temperatures and dwindling agricultural production correlated with warfare frequency in eastern China in the past. The authors reviewed warfare data from 899 wars in eastern China between 1000 and 1911, and cross-referenced these data with Northern Hemispheric climate data for the same period. They found that warfare increased significantly when temperatures fluctuated enough to affect food crops. Their conclusion: in times of ecological stress, warfare could be the ultimate means of redistributing resources. JULIA WHITTY

Epuron

An element speaks. JULIA WHITTY...

| Mon Jul. 9, 2007 1:38 PM EDT

An element speaks.

JULIA WHITTY


Live Earth Concert Kicks Off, Critics Weigh In

Live Earth, the 24-hour concert, part of a larger multi-year campaign called Save Our Selves -- The Campaign for a Climate in Crisis (see video below), kicked off today on all seven continents across the globe. The event, organized by former U.S. Veep Al Gore and the Alliance for Climate Protection, features nearly 150 artists, including U2, Snoop Dogg, and Madonna, who play...

| Sat Jul. 7, 2007 4:52 PM EDT

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Live Earth, the 24-hour concert, part of a larger multi-year campaign called Save Our Selves -- The Campaign for a Climate in Crisis (see video below), kicked off today on all seven continents across the globe. The event, organized by former U.S. Veep Al Gore and the Alliance for Climate Protection, features nearly 150 artists, including U2, Snoop Dogg, and Madonna, who play to trigger a "global movement to solve the climate crisis."

But regardless of the star power, some are critical. Live Aid/Live 8 creator Bob Geldof says, "It's just an enormous pop concert or the umpteenth time that, say, Madonna or Coldplay get up on stage." Keith Farnish, a British environmentalist and the founder of the Earth Blog is "not sure events like this make a difference."

Some are more harsh. Matt Helder, the drummer of Arctic Monkeys, a British Indie rock band, thinks the execution is hypocritical. "We're using enough power for ten houses just for lighting," he notes. This type of skepticism is being echoed by many, but Treehugger, an environmental blog that touts bringing sustainability to the mainstream, reports that steps have been made to make the concert greener and proceeds do go to create a foundation to combat global warming, which will be led by the Alliance for Climate Protection.

The concert does have its supporters (it is estimated that 2 billion people will be reached). Vocalist Patrick Stump of the alt rock band Fallout Boy is hopeful. "If we spread out the influence as much as we can and if we hit some people with some really big ideas, there might be a kid there that will totally eradicate fossil fuel." And of course, Gore is a big, big fan. He says, "the task of saving the global environment is a task we should all approach with a sense of joy."

We want to know what you think?

—Anna Weggel

SOS For Live Earth

The concerts. You know. 7/7/07. New York, London, Johannesburg, Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro, Shanghai, Sydney, Hamburg. JULIA WHITTY...

| Fri Jul. 6, 2007 7:12 PM EDT

The concerts. You know. 7/7/07. New York, London, Johannesburg, Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro, Shanghai, Sydney, Hamburg. JULIA WHITTY