Eating Your Own Dog Food

| Tue Sep. 29, 2009 1:32 PM EDT

Wall Street has a demonstrated aptitude for bundling up and securitizing pretty much anything: mortgages, credit card debt, parking meter collections, naked swaps, bundles of bundles, etc. etc.  So why not put this ability to good use as a way of motivating ratings agencies to care about the accuracy of their ratings?  A reader emails with this elegant suggestion:

Require them to sell collateralized rating obligations. The idea is that they will bundle tranches of ratings together into a form of a put. If the tranche of, say, AAA ratings fail at a rate greater than whatever the published risk of default of the class is, they will be forced to pay a contracted amount to the purchasers.

I like it!  There's no income stream associated with ratings, which is a problem, but surely one that Wall Street can solve.  Instead of paying a fee for getting their securities rated, maybe issuers should instead be required to set aside 0.1% of the income stream from each of their products to be bundled into a Ratings Backed Security.  Agencies would be allowed to sell half the RBS immediately, but would have to hold on to the other half for a set period of time related to the maturity period of the underlying securities.

Or something.  Details are left as an exercise for the reader.  But I like the out-of-the-box thinking here!

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