Filibuster Reform is Dead

| Mon Jan. 24, 2011 1:45 PM EST

Over the weekend a reader asked me whatever happened to Democratic plans to reform the filibuster at the beginning of this year's Senate session. It's still in progress, I said, but I hadn't heard anything specific. However, that was because I didn't read the paper on Saturday. Paul Kane reports:

To the dismay of a younger crop of Democrats and some outside liberal activists, there is no chance that rules surrounding the filibuster will be challenged, senior aides on both sides of the aisle say, because party leaders want to protect the right of the Senate's minority party to sometimes force a supermajority of 60 votes to approve legislation.

Instead, rank-and-file lawmakers will receive pitches from Sens. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), who have been negotiating more limited changes, such as with "secret holds" that allow an anonymous senator to slow legislation. In addition, some modifications could be made to the way confirmations are handled for agency nominees who do not have direct roles in policymaking.

Unsurprisingly, no one wants to seriously muck around with the filibuster. Republicans are opposed because they're the minority party and Democrats are unenthusiastic because someday they might be the minority party:

While liberal groups such as MoveOn.org and some unions such as the Communications Workers of America are supporting the Udall effort, the liberal coalition is far from united on the issue. Some large members of the AFL-CIO have been noticeably silent, while some abortion rights groups have publicly declared their opposition to changing filibuster rules. That, some Democratic aides said, is because in the 1990s and in the early days of the George W. Bush White House - when Republicans controlled both ends of the Capitol - these groups relied on their Senate Democratic allies and the 60-vote threshold to protect key rights such as Davis-Bacon wages for federal works projects and the Roe v. Wade abortion decision.

So there you have it. We'll get some minor changes at best, but nothing serious.

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