2008 - %3, August

Review: HBO's Baghdad High

| Mon Aug. 4, 2008 6:20 PM PDT

If you think high school student dramas are played out, HBO's planning to prove you wrong. Tonight, they'll showcase a class clown, an aspiring musician, a sports stud, and a lovelorn teen. But these aren't your average high school teens—these are students of Baghdad High.

synopsis_baghdad_pic.jpg

Advertise on MotherJones.com

New Videos: Vampire Weekend, The Carribean, The Streets, Spiritualized

| Mon Aug. 4, 2008 4:06 PM PDT

Vampire Weekend – "Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa"

In which the New York band soundtracks some super-awkward party moments at a fancy pad. Don't miss the dreamy shot of lead singer Ezra Koenig superimposed over rolling ocean waves. Swoon!

The Carribbean – "The Go from Tactical"

In which the DC quartet's melancholy tune is illustrated by the cutest little robots you ever did see. It's like Wall-E without the budget!

After the jump: a very long walk and some rather high jumps.

Study: Music Industry Should "Embrace" Illegal Downloads

| Mon Aug. 4, 2008 3:20 PM PDT

mojo-photo-piratecat.jpgHey, look, smart people are saying this too! A new study that looks at Radiohead's online release of In Rainbows last year recommends record companies accept—nay, celebrate—the realities of file-sharing. As we mentioned here a few months back, despite the fact that the British combo's album was available on a pay-what-you-want basis, around twice as many people bypassed the official site anyway to use file-sharing web sites or torrents. Maybe, like me, they had trouble logging on to the official site? Yet the study, by the MCPS-PRS Alliance, which represents music rights holders, and Big Champagne, an online media measurement company, sees this as a positive, calling the Radiohead release a "success story" that resulted in strong ticket sales and enormous publicity. Ultimately, the study concludes, record labels should consider "the costs and benefits of control versus the costs and benefits of scale." The UK Guardian suggests purveyors of frozen delicacies take up this strategy as well, by "giving away free ice-cream and selling advertising on the cones," but I'd like to point out the equivalency would be downloading the recipe for ice cream, wouldn't it?

Last.fm Leads to Uncomfortable Musical Self-Awareness

| Mon Aug. 4, 2008 1:43 PM PDT

mojo-photo-lastlogo.jpgSome readers out there in Rifftopia might consider your ridiculously-named contributor to be an ahead-of-the-curve proponent of bleeding-edge technology. But nothing could be further from the truth. To be honest, I'm like a curmudgeonly grandpa, grudgingly forcing myself to take up new software and gadgets only after their obvious usefulness has finally seeped through my thick skull, and even then it's a real effort. Crimeny, I didn't have a MySpace page until 10 months ago, and I was the last one of my Nebraska family to even get a cell phone. Pathetically lazy or just wary, I'm no "early adopter."

New Music From Around the Blogs: Oasis, The Faint, Divide and Kreate, of Montreal

| Fri Aug. 1, 2008 4:11 PM PDT

mojo-photo-blogmusic0801.jpg

Rolling Stone's Rock 'n' Roll Daily blog announces that Oasis will release their new album, Dig Out Your Soul, on October 7th. A record company suit said it "kicks ass," and why would he lie? If you can't wait for a whole song, check out a 20-second snippet of "The Shock of the Lightning" on YouTube here. You know, it does kind of kick ass. (For fans of: Ride, Coldplay, No Way Sis)

Wired's Listening Post has an exclusive stream of The Faint's "Battle Hymn for Children," from the Saddle Creek alums' upcoming album, Fasciination. With two i's. Don't they teach spelling in Omaha? (For fans of: The Cure, Bloc Party, Cornhuskers)

After the jump: a slow-dance mashup, and a disco-dance assault on the patriarchy

Pineapple Express Ad Propels M.I.A. Into Top 40

| Fri Aug. 1, 2008 3:07 PM PDT

You've seen the ads (if not, click "play" above). The latest Seth Rogen/Judd Apatow adventure, this time with a slightly darker sensibility, is called Pineapple Express. From the commercials, it looks to be some sort of tale about drugs or witnessing a drug-related murder or being on the run from thugs who saw you witnessing the murder, or something. But apparently nobody's paying attention to the images, they're only listening to the music: most of the spot is soundtracked by M.I.A.'s "Paper Planes," a Clash-sampling and Wreckx N Effect-referencing track from last year's Kala, and based on this exposure alone, the song has rocketed up the charts. It's up to #4 on iTunes today, and based almost entirely on these online sales, it broke into the official Billboard charts, climbing to #36 this week. Holy moley, M.I.A.'s Top 40!

After the jump: is it just cause you're all baked?