On Sunday, John Oliver focused his attention on Puerto Rico's paralyzing debt crisis and the fast-approaching May 1 deadline looming over the island to repay $72 billion—an amount the island's governor announced last June could not be repaid and was therefore crippling Puerto Rico's economy. The ongoing crisis has affected many of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million people and shut down schools across the island, while members of Wall Street have profited along the way.

In recent months, a growing number of politicians, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, have called on the US government to provide economic relief and the opportunity for Puerto Rico to restructure its debt. One of the most outspoken defenders of Puerto Rico has been Lin-Manuel Miranda, the creator and star of the Broadway musical "Hamilton." On Sunday, the newly-minted Pulitzer Prize winner appeared on Last Week Tonight to continue his plea for help, this time with a new rap song in hopes that members of Congress will rescue the island. It's a brilliant performance, so be sure to watch above.

Summer Flake
Hello Friends
Rice Is Nice Records

Courtesy of Grandstand Media/Rice Is Nice Records


Australia's Stephanie Craise, who records as Summer Flake, makes electric folk music that's both mammoth and intimate. Her sweet-and-sour combination of frayed guitars and dreamy, overdubbed voices has a bracing sizzle, with sentimental melodies tugging at the heartstrings to amplify the drama. If Hello Friends feels like eavesdropping on someone's aching reveries, it never achieves the creepy oversharing quality sometimes heard in confessional pop, thanks to Craise's vibrant sense of songcraft. Check out "So Long" and "Make Your Way Back to Me," both five-minute-plus epics that benefit from their extended running time by allowing her to slowly cast a powerful spell. Following last year's tantalizing, albeit tentative, Time Rolls By EP, this arresting album marks an exciting leap forward. Bravo!

Today, the world mourns the death of legendary musician Prince, the prolific artist who produced countless hits such as "When Doves Cry" and "1999."

Just a week before his death was reported on Thursday, the pop star played two sold-out shows in Atlanta, where he performed one of his most celebrated songs, "Purple Rain." The concert enforced Prince's long-standing ban on cameras, but one concertgoer managed to record a quick clip:

Over the past year, American lawmakers have expressed outrage over the water crisis in Flint, Michigan—a "man-made disaster" that poisoned thousands of children living in the city, while state officials knew that the city's tap water was in fact unsafe to drink.

But as John Oliver noted on the latest Last Week Tonight, lead contamination extends far beyond Flint. According to a USA Today study cited on Sunday, nearly 2,000 water systems across the United States have been detected for excessive lead levels. The problem gets even worse when children ingest lead paint dust, which is present in 2.1 million homes across the country where children under the age of six live.

"There is no safe level of lead," Oliver said. "It's one of those things that are so dangerous, you shouldn't even let a little bit inside of you—much like heroin or Jeremy Piven. Even low-level exposure can lead to irreversible damage like lower IQ's, anti-social behavior, and reduced attention span."

Despite the outrage, Congress continues to deny the crucial funding needed to start removing lead from American homes.

"That's what makes it so frustrating that last year all of those men voted for a bill that would have reduced the already low funding for hot lead abatement programs by $35 million, amounting to a 32 percent cut," Oliver said. "And the truth is, if you cut funding like that, a whole lot more children might get poisoned."

While the cuts never passed, funding to correct the issue has remained flat and continues to put children at risk for lead exposure across the country.

For more on Flint, check out Mother Jones' investigation into the crisis here.

Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil
Dois Amigos, Um Seculo de Musica: Multishow Live
Nonesuch

Nonesuch Records

 

The great Brazilian singer-songwriters Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil go back a half-century together. Spearheading the Tropicalia movement, which blended traditional and modern pop music, they ran afoul of the country's authoritarian government in the '60s, leading to brief imprisonment and then exile, though both eventually came home to continue their brilliant careers. But you don't have to know ancient history (or Portuguese) to appreciate this wonderful live album, drawn from their joint 2015 tour. Performing together and separately, with just their acoustic guitars for support, Veloso and Gil epitomize playful grace and warm camaraderie on these entrancing, deftly melodic songs. Both have aged well and blend beautifully: Caetano possesses the sweeter, smoother voice, while Gilberto is a deeper, slightly raspier singer. Dois Amigos is a lovely introduction to—or triumphant reminder of—two remarkable artists.

The elite gentlemen of the Porcellian Club, Harvard's centuries-old social club that boasts the likes of Teddy Roosevelt and the Winklevoss twins among its alumni, emerged from years of silence on Tuesday to reject the university's calls for clubs to join the 21st century and include women into its exclusive ranks.

"To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time an officer of the PC has granted an on-the-record statement to a newspaper since our founding in 1791," Charles Storey, a graduate from the class of '82 and the club's graduate board president, wrote to Harvard's student newspaper the Crimson. "This reflects both the PC's abiding interest in privacy and the importance of the situation."

Storey goes on to argue that by forcing clubs to invite female members, the change would "potentially increase, not decrease the potential for sexual misconduct"—essentially making the case that instead of broadening women's access to the benefits of these social clubs, the university's efforts could actually jeopardize a woman's safety.

"Given our policies, we are mystified as to why the current administration feels that forcing our club to accept female members would reduce the incidence of sexual assault on campus," Storey continued.

Storey isn't alone in his staunch resolve to remain stuck on the wrong side of history. Another Porcellian Club member, who wished to remain anonymous, told the Washington Post that the university's efforts would disrupt the club's intention to develop "deep male friendships."

"We don't want to be involved in anyone else's business, we just want to be left alone to carry on our 225-year traditions in peace," he noted.

Last year, a similar conflict erupted when women fought to perform in Harvard's Hasty Pudding theatrical group, which has been all-male since its founding in 1795. Despite their attempts, none of the 17 women who auditioned were accepted into the troupe.

"I want to say that it's unsettling that there will be no women on stage tonight,’’ Amy Poehler said when accepting the group's "Woman of the Year" award last January. "You know it's time for a change when the Augusta National Golf Club has lapped you in terms of being progressive."

On the latest Full Frontal, Samantha Bee took us on her quest to rent the costume of the National Rifle Association's esteemed gun safety mascot, Eddie Eagle. But doing so proved to be a surprisingly onerous process—one that required filling out an 18-page application and dealing with the group's mandatory 20-day waiting period before anyone can get their hands on Eddie's gear.

Compare that with the relatively simple task of acquiring a gun, whether online, at your run-of-the-mill gun shop, or at a gun show in New Mexico:

"Are you a felon?" one gun own seller in New Mexico asked a Full Frontal producer.

"No," she replied.

"Okay."

Another gun secured! As the episode went on, Bee and her team were able to add to their arsenal with frightening ease, all while being repeatedly denied an elusive Eddie Eagle costume.

John Oliver took on the dicey world of credit reporting, or as the Last Week Tonight host described it on Sunday, the "basis for the single most important three-digit number in your whole life other than 311—the Beatles of rap rock."

Businesses use credit reports to determine whether to lend credit to someone. But as Oliver explained, nearly a quarter of every credit report contains inaccurate information, including critical errors that can block a person from getting hired at a job and even renting an apartment.

It's an error-ridden process by which many important life events are effectively destroyed. Watch above to see how Oliver tries to get credit reporting companies to understand the gravity of these routine mistakes.

Teddy Thompson & Kelly Jones
Little Windows
Cooking Vinyl

Missing Piece Group

George and Tammy…Porter and Dolly…Teddy and Kelly? Teddy Thompson (son of Richard and Linda) and Kelly Jones have a ways to go before they're recognized as the next great male-female duo, but this winning twosome is off to a fine start with Little Windows. Blending their plaintive voices in seamless, high-lonesome harmonies that would do the Everly Brothers proud, they explore love's many complications in memorable country-pop tunes both jaunty ("Wondering") and mournful ("I Thought That We Said Goodbye"). Long on atmosphere and short on pandering nostalgia, despite an old-school vibe, songs like the dreamy 3:00 a.m. ballad "Don't Remind Me" would inspire goosebumps in any era. Here's to a long partnership!
 

 

On Wednesday night, The Daily Show's Jessica Williams confronted the growing panic in state legislatures over transgender people and where they can go to the bathroom. North Carolina continues to face a massive backlash from the business community for the bathroom law it enacted in March that, among other things, requires people to pee in the location that corresponds with the sex on their birth certificates. Police departments in North Carolina say they're puzzled by the law, which critics say will be all but impossible to enforce. On Wednesday, a state senator in South Carolina introduced another so-called bathroom bill, while the Tennessee House revived one of its own.

Williams interviewed several transgender people for her sketch, including a black trans woman who was arrested last year in Iowa—where she had traveled to attend a funeral—because she didn't have a copy of her prescription for her hormone pills. (She spent eight days in jail and missed the funeral, and the charges were later dropped.) "Because of discrimination and profiling, at least 47 percent of black trans people will have at some point in their lives been incarcerated," Williams explained. "You'd think there'd be laws to correct this. But instead, this year alone, state legislatures have introduced 175 anti-trans bills."

Proponents of bathroom bills say they're necessary to prevent trans women from acting as sexual predators on girls in bathrooms. But experts say these fears aren't based on reality. "If anything, trans people are the ones getting assaulted," one trans man told Williams. Watch the Daily Show clip above for more, and check out our coverage of anti-trans violence here.