Mixed Media

This Is the Unprecedented New Law France Just Passed to Eliminate Supermarket Waste

| Tue May 26, 2015 2:39 PM EDT

On Thursday, France's parliament unanimously approved a new law prohibiting large supermarkets from throwing out unsold food, instead mandating stores donate any surplus groceries to charities or for animal feed use.

The law, which aims to reduce waste in a country where people trash up to 30 kilos of food per person annually, is part of a more general energy and  environmental bill.

"There's an absolute urgency—charities are desperate for food," MP Yves Jégo said. "The most moving part of this law is that it opens us up to others who are suffering."

The new regulations will also ban the common practice of intentionally destroying unsold food by bleaching it—a process meant to prevent people from searching for food in dumpsters, which has lead to lawsuits after people became sick from eating spoiled food.

Now, the local politician who sparked the law's creation is hoping other countries will adopt similar bans on supermarket waste. Arash Derambarsh, who slammed such bleaching practices as "scandalous" to the Guardian, will take his campaign to a United Nations' summit discussing ways to end poverty this November.

In the United States, nearly half of all food goes uneaten and sent to landfills.

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The Freewheeling Fun of Jazz Guitarist Wes Montgomery's Live Concerts

| Mon May 25, 2015 4:40 PM EDT

Wes Montgomery
In the Beginning
Resonance

Near the end of his life, jazz guitar virtuoso Wes Montgomery (1923-1968) caught the ear of pop audiences with a series of records that were slick and sophisticated, but a little dull. This vibrant two-disc set is far more satisfying. Spanning 1949 to 1958, In the Beginning is dominated by live performances from Montgomery's hometown of Indianapolis, in small-group settings that often featured brothers Monk (bass) and Buddy (piano), along with underrated tenor sax player Alonzo "Pookie" Johnson. The recordings aren't perfect technically, and the playing isn't always razor-sharp, but all concerned sound like they're having a great time, especially Wes, who swings and struts with a freewheeling joy missing from his later work. Also included are five polished studio tracks produced by none other than a 22-year-old Quincy Jones, although these pale next to the spontaneous sounds of Wes Montgomery onstage, finding himself and having fun.

Michael B. Jordan Just Slammed People Who Can’t Deal With One of the Fantastic 4 Being Black—And It’s Great

| Sat May 23, 2015 8:25 PM EDT

These days, when the fate of the world hangs in the balance, the superheroes that end up saving the day are normally straight, white men—at least on the big screen. 

While Marvel's comics have become increasingly more diverse over the years with a half-black, half-Hispanic Spiderman and a female version of Thor, its cinematic universe remains largely male and whitewashed. This is why the backlash to Michael B. Jordan being cast in the highly-anticipated reboot of Fantastic Fouris so disheartening. When the actor was originally confirmed to play Johnny Storm a.k.a the Human Torch, naysayers took to social media to complain about the black actor would be playing a traditionally white character. (When TMZ asked what he thought of the criticism, Jordan quipped: "They're still going to see [the movie] anyway.")

Attention, trolls and comic book purists: The idea that Jordan shouldn't be Johnny Storm because he's black is misguided, because, you know, comic books are fictional and so are the movies. Anyone can fill these roles and do a great job (see Idris Elba as a Norse god in Thor).

In an essay published Friday in Entertainment Weekly, Jordan slammed  people who are having a hard time accepting that in the new movie only three  of the fantastic four are white.

This is a family movie about four friends—two of whom are myself and Kate Mara as my adopted sister—who are brought together by a series of unfortunate events to create unity and a team. That’s the message of the movie, if people can just allow themselves to see it.

Sometimes you have to be the person who stands up and says, "I’ll be the one to shoulder all this hate. I’ll take the brunt for the next couple of generations." I put that responsibility on myself. People are always going to see each other in terms of race, but maybe in the future we won’t talk about it as much. Maybe, if I set an example, Hollywood will start considering more people of color in other prominent roles, and maybe we can reach the people who are stuck in the mindset that "it has to be true to the comic book." Or maybe we have to reach past them.

To the trolls on the Internet, I want to say: Get your head out of the computer. Go outside and walk around. Look at the people walking next to you. Look at your friends’ friends and who they’re interacting with. And just understand this is the world we live in. It’s okay to like it.

Let's sum up Jordan's smackdown in one line: The Human Torch is whatever Marvel says it is. You can see how Jordan does in theaters on August 7. 

The President of the Boy Scouts of America Just Endorsed Dropping the Ban on Gay Leaders

| Thu May 21, 2015 2:14 PM EDT

The president of Boy Scouts of America is calling for an end to the organization's ban on gay leaders, saying the "status quo in our movement's membership standards cannot be sustained." Robert Gates, who was speaking at the group's annual summit on Thursday, said the changes would not be made at the meeting, but indicated officials should look into revisions in the future.

In Gates's remarks, the former defense secretary urged the organization to "deal with the world as it is, not as we might wish it be." His address, sure to ruffle a few feathers, stopped short of supporting gay rights outright. Instead, Gates said that the policy shift was necessary to keep the organization nationally relevant.

"While our work won't be done until we see a full end to their ban on gay adults once and for all, today's announcement is a significant step in that direction," Zach Wahls, director for Equality, said in response to Thursday's announcement. "I'm proud to see Dr. Gates charting a course towards full equality in the BSA."

In 2013, the Boy Scouts of America voted to allow openly gay scouts—gay leaders however were not included in the changes. Just yesterday, the Girls Scouts of America double downed on the group's welcoming of transgender girls.

This Story Maggie Gyllenhaal Just Told Perfectly Explains the Hollywood Sexism Complex

| Thu May 21, 2015 12:46 PM EDT

Maggie Gyllenhaal recently lost a film role because she was apparently "too old" to play the love interest of a 55-year-old man, the 37-year-old actress revealed in a new interview with The Wrap.

"There are things that are really disappointing about being an actress in Hollywood that surprise me all the time,” Gyllenhall said. "I'm 37 and I was told recently I was too old to play the lover of a man who was 55. It was astonishing to me."

While she declined to identify the project's name—because Gyllenhall is all class—she said she was eventually able to laugh off the rejection. 

"It made me feel bad, and then it made me feel angry, and then it made me laugh."

Back in January, Gyllenhaal picked up a Golden Globe award for her performance in the BBC miniseries The Honourable Woman. During her acceptance speech, she stressed the importance of Hollywood embracing the roles of real women.

"When I look around the room at the women who are here and I think about the performances that I've watched this year what I see actually are women who are sometimes powerful and sometimes not, sometimes sexy, sometimes not, sometimes honorable, sometimes not," she said onstage. "What I think is new is the wealth of roles for actual women in television and in film. That's what I think is revolutionary and evolutionary and it's what's turning me on."

Despite Gyllenhaal's optimism, it sure looks like Hollywood is hell bent on keeping ageism securely intact. 

This New Study Shows Sexual Assault on College Campuses Has Reached "Epidemic" Levels

| Wed May 20, 2015 4:19 PM EDT

A new study published online by the Journal of Adolescent Health suggests college sexual assault may be far more prevalent than previously believed. The study, titled "Incapacitated and Forcible Rape of College Women: Prevalence Across the First Year," which focused on first-year female students at one New York college, attempted to measure how frequently rape or attempted rape occurred by having female students fill out surveys throughout their freshman year.

Of the 483 women who completed the questionnaires, 18.6 percent reported instances of attempted rape. Incidences of rape were significantly higher when alcohol or drugs were involved.

"Sexual violence on campus has reached epidemic levels," the study's authors wrote. "During their first year in college, one in seven women will have experienced incapacitated assault or rape and nearly one in 10 will have experienced forcible assault or rape. Interventions to reduce sexual violence on campus are urgently needed."

Past studies have posted similar rates. One study reported one in five women suffering from some form of sexual violence during their college careers.  What is striking about these new findings is that they indicate high levels of such sexual assault in just a single year and early on in a woman's college experience.

As Jesse Singal at the Science of Us blog notes, scientifically measuring the frequency of sexual violence is a complex and difficult task: What one person considers to be sexual assault someone else might not.  In addition, this latest study only focused on one campus—making it impossible to generalize on a national scale.

But as recent events have shown, sexual violence on college campuses is a persistent problem. For decades, conservatives have resisted calls for campuses to better protect women by dismissing the issue. With the fallout over Rolling Stone's botched campus rape investigation only fueling detractors, it's especially important for studies like the one published by the Journal of Adolescent Health to provide solid data to legitimize the problem so that potential assaults might be avoided.

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Michelle Obama Can Kick Your Ass

| Wed May 20, 2015 11:32 AM EDT

Feeling pleased with your morning run or cardio stroll? Well here's a reminder that Michelle Obama, who was already likely to be crushing you in most parts of your life, rules when it comes to the exercise game.  

In a new video posted to her @FLOTUS account, the first lady responded to the president's #GimmeFive challenge by showing off her fierce workout skills—boxing, lifting, and jumping rope. 

So thanks for the assist Lebron, but this glimpse into Obama's workout proves once again the first lady can hold court all on her own.

Columbia Student Defiantly Carries Mattress to Graduation to Protest Sexual Assault

| Tue May 19, 2015 2:20 PM EDT

Emma Sulkowicz, the Columbia University student who protested her alleged sexual assault by carrying a mattress every day to campus last year, graduated today. The mattress, the defining symbol of her assault and senior arts thesis titled Mattress Performance (Carry That Weight), was also present at Tuesday's ceremony, despite the school administration urging students not to bring large items that could potentially "create discomfort to others."

Sulkowicz was seen hauling her mattress to the ceremony with the help of friends and fellow graduating students. According to Columbia Spectator editor Teo Armus, when Sulkowicz went on stage to collect her diploma, she pointedly did not shake university president Lee Bollinger's hand.

In September, Sulkowicz became a national figure and an unofficial spokesperson for sexual assault activists after she went public with her rape. She vowed to carry the mattress to class for as long as the student who she says assaulted her was not prosecuted or expelled. In April, her alleged rapist, Paul Nungesser, filed a lawsuit against the university claiming administrators exhibited bias and failed to protect him from the accusations. He says their alleged failure "destroyed" his college experience and reputation. 

Nungesser also graduated and was present at Tuesday's ceremony.

 

Taylor Swift: "Misogyny Is Ingrained in People From the Time They Are Born"

| Tue May 19, 2015 9:36 AM EDT

According to this year's "Hot 100" list, an annual inventory in which Maxim's editors meticulously rank famous women by level of attractiveness, Taylor Swift is 2015's reigning queen of female hotness. Rather than use the title to gloat about her declared hotness, Swift used the magazine's cover to call out the double standards women face everyday and the importance of feminism in her life today: From Maxim:

Honestly, I didn't have an accurate definition of feminism when I was younger. I didn't quite see all the ways that feminism is vital to growing up in the world we live in. I think that when I used to say, "Oh, feminism's not really on my radar," it was because when I was just seen as a kid, I wasn't as threatening. I didn't see myself being held back until I was a woman. Or the double standards in headlines, the double standards in the way stories are told, the double standards in the way things are perceived.

Swift's interview is especially noteworthy considering in 2012, she shied away from the label to the Daily Beast, telling the news site she didn't view matters as a "guys versus girls" situation. This was also during a time in which the media unfairly portrayed Swift as something of a pathetic boy chaser—a female singer who used her lyrics to lament about the latest boy who got away.

Since then, she has shattered that image with very real, thoughtful insight into an industry built on sexist frameworks:

A man writing about his feelings from a vulnerable place is brave; a woman writing about her feelings from a vulnerable place is oversharing or whining. Misogyny is ingrained in people from the time they are born. So to me, feminism is probably the most important movement that you could embrace, because it's just basically another word for equality.

This is what young girls need today. Now, we leave you with her badass new video, "Bad Blood."

 

John Oliver Explains How the Chicken Industry Systematically Screws Over Impoverished Farmers

| Mon May 18, 2015 9:56 AM EDT

Americans eat a ton of chicken—so much so, chicken farmers produce 160 million chicks a week just to keep up with national consumption, according to the latest "Last Week Tonight." But despite the industry's massive output, many contract farmers live near or below the poverty line, all while working under the constant fear of losing their jobs. And that's because the business model is such that farmers own the equipment used to raise the chickens, and corporations own the chickens.

"That essentially means you own everything that costs money, and we own everything that makes money," Oliver explains.

Perhaps the most damning part of the segment is a defense from Tom Super of the National Chicken Council, who responded to the question of why farmers live under the poverty line with the following: "Which poverty line are you referring to? Is that a national poverty line? Is that a state poverty line? The poverty line in Mississippi and Alabama is different than it is in New York City.”

"What the fuck are you talking about?" Oliver shot back. "It doesn't matter. The poverty line is like the age of consent: if you find yourself parsing exactly where it is, you’ve probably already done something very, very wrong."