The elite gentlemen of the Porcellian Club, Harvard's centuries-old social club that boasts the likes of Teddy Roosevelt and the Winklevoss twins among its alumni, emerged from years of silence on Tuesday to reject the university's calls for clubs to join the 21st century and include women into its exclusive ranks.

"To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time an officer of the PC has granted an on-the-record statement to a newspaper since our founding in 1791," Charles Storey, a graduate from the class of '82 and the club's graduate board president, wrote to Harvard's student newspaper the Crimson. "This reflects both the PC's abiding interest in privacy and the importance of the situation."

Storey goes on to argue that by forcing clubs to invite female members, the change would "potentially increase, not decrease the potential for sexual misconduct"—essentially making the case that instead of broadening women's access to the benefits of these social clubs, the university's efforts could actually jeopardize a woman's safety.

"Given our policies, we are mystified as to why the current administration feels that forcing our club to accept female members would reduce the incidence of sexual assault on campus," Storey continued.

Storey isn't alone in his staunch resolve to remain stuck on the wrong side of history. Another Porcellian Club member, who wished to remain anonymous, told the Washington Post that the university's efforts would disrupt the club's intention to develop "deep male friendships."

"We don't want to be involved in anyone else's business, we just want to be left alone to carry on our 225-year traditions in peace," he noted.

Last year, a similar conflict erupted when women fought to perform in Harvard's Hasty Pudding theatrical group, which has been all-male since its founding in 1795. Despite their attempts, none of the 17 women who auditioned were accepted into the troupe.

"I want to say that it's unsettling that there will be no women on stage tonight,’’ Amy Poehler said when accepting the group's "Woman of the Year" award last January. "You know it's time for a change when the Augusta National Golf Club has lapped you in terms of being progressive."

On the latest Full Frontal, Samantha Bee took us on her quest to rent the costume of the National Rifle Association's esteemed gun safety mascot, Eddie Eagle. But doing so proved to be a surprisingly onerous process—one that required filling out an 18-page application and dealing with the group's mandatory 20-day waiting period before anyone can get their hands on Eddie's gear.

Compare that with the relatively simple task of acquiring a gun, whether online, at your run-of-the-mill gun shop, or at a gun show in New Mexico:

"Are you a felon?" one gun own seller in New Mexico asked a Full Frontal producer.

"No," she replied.

"Okay."

Another gun secured! As the episode went on, Bee and her team were able to add to their arsenal with frightening ease, all while being repeatedly denied an elusive Eddie Eagle costume.

John Oliver took on the dicey world of credit reporting, or as the Last Week Tonight host described it on Sunday, the "basis for the single most important three-digit number in your whole life other than 311—the Beatles of rap rock."

Businesses use credit reports to determine whether to lend credit to someone. But as Oliver explained, nearly a quarter of every credit report contains inaccurate information, including critical errors that can block a person from getting hired at a job and even renting an apartment.

It's an error-ridden process by which many important life events are effectively destroyed. Watch above to see how Oliver tries to get credit reporting companies to understand the gravity of these routine mistakes.

Teddy Thompson & Kelly Jones
Little Windows
Cooking Vinyl

Missing Piece Group

George and Tammy…Porter and Dolly…Teddy and Kelly? Teddy Thompson (son of Richard and Linda) and Kelly Jones have a ways to go before they're recognized as the next great male-female duo, but this winning twosome is off to a fine start with Little Windows. Blending their plaintive voices in seamless, high-lonesome harmonies that would do the Everly Brothers proud, they explore love's many complications in memorable country-pop tunes both jaunty ("Wondering") and mournful ("I Thought That We Said Goodbye"). Long on atmosphere and short on pandering nostalgia, despite an old-school vibe, songs like the dreamy 3:00 a.m. ballad "Don't Remind Me" would inspire goosebumps in any era. Here's to a long partnership!
 

 

On Wednesday night, The Daily Show's Jessica Williams confronted the growing panic in state legislatures over transgender people and where they can go to the bathroom. North Carolina continues to face a massive backlash from the business community for the bathroom law it enacted in March that, among other things, requires people to pee in the location that corresponds with the sex on their birth certificates. Police departments in North Carolina say they're puzzled by the law, which critics say will be all but impossible to enforce. On Wednesday, a state senator in South Carolina introduced another so-called bathroom bill, while the Tennessee House revived one of its own.

Williams interviewed several transgender people for her sketch, including a black trans woman who was arrested last year in Iowa—where she had traveled to attend a funeral—because she didn't have a copy of her prescription for her hormone pills. (She spent eight days in jail and missed the funeral, and the charges were later dropped.) "Because of discrimination and profiling, at least 47 percent of black trans people will have at some point in their lives been incarcerated," Williams explained. "You'd think there'd be laws to correct this. But instead, this year alone, state legislatures have introduced 175 anti-trans bills."

Proponents of bathroom bills say they're necessary to prevent trans women from acting as sexual predators on girls in bathrooms. But experts say these fears aren't based on reality. "If anything, trans people are the ones getting assaulted," one trans man told Williams. Watch the Daily Show clip above for more, and check out our coverage of anti-trans violence here. 

Florida Gov. Rick Scott was served quite the verbal beatdown on Tuesday after a woman publicly shamed the Republican governor for a laundry list of GOP-supported issues—and it all unfolded on camera at a local Gainesville Starbucks.

"You cut Medicaid so I couldn't get Obamacare," Cara Jennings told the visibly shaken governor as he waited to pay for his coffee. "You're an asshole. You don't care about the working people. You should be ashamed to show your face around here."

When Scott attempted to placate Jennings with the defense that his governorship created a million jobs, Jennings refused to back down and continued with her stunning reproach.

"A million jobs?" Jennings responded. "Who here has a great job or is looking forward to finishing school? Do you really feel like you have a job coming up?"

"You strip women of access to public health care. Shame on you, Rick Scott!"

Afterwards, Jennings told a local news station that several people thanked her for taking a stand against the governor. The incident, however, proved too much for Scott, who slunk out of the Starbucks empty-handed.

Robbie Fulks
Upland Stories
Bloodshot

Courtesy of Bloodshot Records


During his stellar two-decade-plus career, alt-country mainstay Robbie Fulks has played everything from a smartass provocateur who once serenaded Nashville in the snarky ditty "Fuck This Town" to a reverent curator who celebrated the old masters with the covers album 13 Hillbilly Giants. On the sobering and typically excellent Upland Stories he plays it straight, telling austere tales of quiet desperation and glimmering hope like "Never Come Home" and "America Is a Hard Religion," which draw inspiration from such literary lights as James Agee and Flannery O'Connor. (No need to worry about Profound Artist Syndrome, however; he couldn't strike a pretentious note if his life depended on it.) Fulks' spare acoustic guitar, enhanced by understated fiddle, steel guitar and the like, provide the perfect backdrop for his tender twang of a voice, allowing these thoughtful songs to be experienced in all their empathetic, insightful brilliance.

Elvis Presley
The Album Collection
RCA Records/Legacy Recordings

Courtesy of Sony Music

Massive, intriguing, and riddled with contradictions, this 60-disc extravaganza collects every album Elvis Presley released during his lifetime, offering the ultimate chronicle of The King's wildly fluctuating artistic fortunes over the course of 22 years. Among the contents: the great early works, 17 soundtracks, ranging from rousing (King Creole) to dreadful (Clambake), way too many live albums, especially as Elvis lost interest in the studio during the second half of his career, and a clutch of absolutely essential greatest hits collections. Accompanied by a 300-page hardcover book full of cool pictures and session info, The Album Collection features two agreeably silly Christmas albums, the gospel gem His Hand in Mine, Presley's late-'60s return to greatness on his TV special and subsequent classic Memphis sessions, and his slow physical and musical decline in the '70s, concluding with the weary Moody Blue. While three discs of odds and ends try to gather up the relevant leftovers, there's no single disc devoted to the landmark Sun rockabilly recordings that put him on the map in the first place; those are scattered across some of the '50s albums in slapdash fashion. That caveat aside, this behemoth of a set is hard to resist.


Gaz Coombes
Matador
Hot Fruit Recordings/Kobalt Label Services

Courtesy of Nasty Little Man

 

As leader of the groovy British trio Supergrass, Gaz Coombes was responsible for insanely catchy tunes that blended the muscular force of heavy metal with the insistent charm of vintage power pop. Even if you don't know the band's classic "Caught by the Fuzz" by name, you’ve surely heard (and probably loved) it. On his own, Coombes has added new elements to his arsenal without abandoning his strengths. Finally getting a proper Stateside release after being available elsewhere last year, his enthralling second solo album finds the lad exploring his epic tendencies, crafting sweeping pieces that nod more than a little to Queen and David Bowie at their grandiose '70s best. (There's even a song entitled "The Girl Who Fell to Earth"). Oddly, however, Matador never feels self-indulgent, thanks to Coombes' unpretentious, slightly raspy singing and unfailing knack for twisty, inventive melodies. Two fine live tracks tacked on as a bonus prove Coombes isn't just a creature of the studio, but his high drama requires no apologies.

On the latest Last Week Tonight, John Oliver took on the business of congressional fundraising and the overwhelming amount of time lawmakers spend just to raise money—a grueling task many politicians cite as the worst part of their jobs.

"In the 2014 election cycle, candidates for the House and Senate raised a combined $1.7 billion dollars," Oliver explained. "That's a lot of money. That's more than it costs to buy 213 million tubes of hemorrhoidal cooling gel, and it's somehow even more upsetting."

Another reason politicians endlessly fundraise is partly because of hefty membership dues required by some political groups such as the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee—dues that can range from $125,000 to a whopping $800,000, according to Oliver.

"Is it any wonder that politicians are hitting up their customer base harder than a Girl Scout with gambling debts?"

Oliver goes on to break down how all that time is spent—from attending depressing fundraisers to cold-calling donors for hours a day—and he explains why neither side of the aisle is willing to fix the problem.