Mixed Media

TV on the Radio, M.I.A. Top Village Voice 2008 Critics' Poll

| Thu Jan. 22, 2009 9:44 PM EST
There were few surprises in this year's Pazz & Jop, the Village Voice poll that almost inevitably seems to come up with the most reliably accurate rundown of the previous year in music. TV on the Radio ran away with the album honors, with Dear Science earning 1754 points in the poll, way ahead of runner-up Vampire Weekend's 1075 and close third Portishead's, er, Third, with 1058. M.I.A. was able to take the top spot on the singles list despite the fact that "Paper Planes" came out in 2007—in fact, the poll includes 2007 votes, which propelled M.I.A. past Estelle's "American Boy" at #2 and Beyonce's "Single Ladies" at #3. Cheaters, but I'll allow it since I don't want Estelle to be #1. Accompanying essays include noted Party Ben opponent Rob Harvilla's musings on how M.I.A. captured our collective imaginations, and a more serious look at TV on the Radio from Andy Beta, who hesitantly posits that the multiracial New York combo's success may parallel our new president's.

Top 10s after the jump.

ALBUMS
1. TV On The Radio - Dear Science
2. Vampire Weekend - S/T
3. Portishead - Third
4. Erykah Badu - New Amerykah Vol. 1: Fourth World War
5. Fleet Foxes - S/T
6. Lil Wayne - Tha Carter III
7. Santogold - S/T
8. Bon Iver - For Emma, Forever Ago
9. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds - Dig!!! Lazarus Dig!!!
10. Kanye West - 808s & Heartbreak

SINGLES
1. M.I.A., "Paper Planes"
2. Estelle feat. Kanye West, "American Boy"
3. Beyoncé "Single Ladies"
4. MGMT, "Time To Pretend"
5. Lil Wayne, "A Milli"
6. Santogold, "L.E.S. Artistes"
7. Hercules & Love Affair, "Blind"
8. Coldplay, "Viva La Vida"
9. Kanye West, "Love Lockdown"
10. Fleet Foxes, "White Winter Hymnal"

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Benjamin Button, Slumdog Lead Oscar Nods

| Thu Jan. 22, 2009 3:06 PM EST

Before we do anything here, I'd just like to post this video from Funny or Die comparing The Curious Case of Benjamin Button to another fine Oscar favorite:

Somebody should sue. Anyway, Forrest Gump 2: Old Dude Gets Young grabbed 11 whoops, 13 nominations for this year's Oscars, beating out Slumdog Millionaire which garnered 10. Other best picture competitors include Frost/Nixon, Milk and The Reader. The acting nominations were a little surprising: Kate Winslet, who won Golden Globes for Revolutionary Road and The Reader, was nominated only for the latter, and in the best actress category rather than supporting; Clint Eastwood was snubbed in acting categories, as was Golden Globe winner Sally Hawkins. Perhaps the most heartwarming aspect of the nominations was the poor performance of The Dark Knight, skulking away into its batcave with 8 nominations, all technical except for Heath Ledger's posthumous supporting actor nod.

After the jump: Best Animated Short Films!

Love Guru, Disaster Movie Top Razzie Nominations

| Wed Jan. 21, 2009 8:48 PM EST

mojo-razzie.jpgHow awesome are the Golden Raspberry Awards? They're like the conscience of Hollywood, with a healthy dose of alliterative, sarcastic wit thrown in. The Razzies have been awarded every year since 1980, and this year's nominations are out now, complete with a press release that compares the "plethora of putrid motion pictures" coming from Hollywood to the "disastrous" economic downturn. It helps to imagine the voice of Snagglepuss reading it. The Love Guru was the most-honored film this year, with seven total nominations; other "Worst Picture" nods include Disaster Movie, The Happening, The Hottie and the Nottie, Meet the Spartans and In the Name of the King. Uwe Boll, referred to as "Germany's answer to Ed Wood," will receive a special Worst Career Achievement award. Much deserved.

These Razzies are to be given out at a ceremony February 21 (the day before the Oscars, naturally), and you know, some people have actually turned up to accept their awards in the past: Tom Green, Tom Selleck, Halle Berry and Bill Cosby have all made appearances. If they had a blog version, or a mash-up Razzies, I would totally go. The full list of nominees is after the jump.

Mystery Solved: Where'd Shepard Fairey Get His Obama Headshot?

| Wed Jan. 21, 2009 6:15 PM EST

It may be the most memorable piece of campaign-trail propaganda in recent memory, but Shepard Fairey's Obama "Hope" poster also has been something of a graphic-design mystery since it was unveiled a year ago. Amazingly, until now, no one's known where the original image of Barack Obama that Fairey used came from. Fairey's been slammed for lifting images from other artists and photographers without adequate attribution or compensation, so it's not surprising that he didn't keep track of his source image. (For more on Fairey's response to criticism that he's a rip-off artist with mad Adobe Illustrator skills, see Mother Jones' recent interview with him.) Last week, a gallery owner claimed victory, saying he'd tracked down the original to a Reuters photographer. But now Philadelphia Inquirer photographer Tom Gralish has definitively solved the mystery of the missing headshot. He's located the true original, a photo shot by an AP freelancer at an April 2006 National Press Club meeting where then-senator Obama and George Clooney talked about Darfur.

New U2 Song Picks Up Where Queens of the Stone Age Left Off

| Wed Jan. 21, 2009 5:55 PM EST

mojo-u2-boots.jpgU2's new single, "Get on Your Boots," from their upcoming album with the weird cover, has made its debut, and it's okay. You can listen to a stream over here or at Last.fm, and you can even buy it, unexpectedly early, on iTunes. "Boots" is already a massive radio phenomenon, hitting No. 1 in Ireland and No. 4 in the U.K. on airplay-monitor charts and dominating radio playlists around the US. The track has a fuzzy, lo-fi vibe, and at the very least is a welcome break from the highly-produced pop of "Beautiful Day" or "City of Blinding Lights." More than anything, it evokes Southern California combo (and Party Ben faves) Queens of the Stone Age, with its rumbling guitars and vaguely Eastern half-step chord change. Unfortunately there really isn't a hook, other than the half-hearted exhortation to adorn one's feet with the aforementioned footwear. I'll be interested to see if the single has legs (ahem!) and if there's anything better on the album (out March 3).

Inaugural Ball Performance Wrapup

| Wed Jan. 21, 2009 4:22 PM EST

So many stars, so little time! First up, via Pitchfork, it's this tear-jerking performance from Beyoncé at the Neighborhood Ball. She does an admirably restrained version of Etta James' "At Last" as our first couple dances somewhat awkwardly but charmingly on stage.

After the jump: Kanye, Mariah, and the 12-headed pop-rock-rap monster.

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Death of Satire Watch, Part I: Get Your War On, R.I.P.

| Wed Jan. 21, 2009 2:34 PM EST

gywosocks.gifWith George W. Bush gone and Obama still in his 100-hour honeymoon, there's been much hand-wringing about the fate of lefty political satire. The post-ironic era has already taken a victim: David Rees' guerrilla comic strip Get Your War On, which ended a nearly seven-year run yesterday. Born in the days when Bush was riding high in the polls and America was sticking its boot in the world's ass, GYWO channeled lonely lefties' frustration through a strip entirely based on repetitious office-themed clip art, ripped-from-the-buried-headlines rants—and a dash of expletives. (As Rees told Mother Jones in 2003, all the swearing wasn't meant to shock, but was a "rhythmic placeholder.") If you spent the last eight years in a continual state of "WTF?!", this was your strip. Rees put together a few compilations and Rolling Stone picked GYWO up as a weekly feature. And now it's freakin' gone. I can't tell if Rees' foul-mouthed cubicle drones are dead or just giving Obama a pass. Maybe they're just looking for new targets for their disdain—like Thomas Friedman.

Inauguration Concert Veers from the Sublime to the Ridiculous

| Sun Jan. 18, 2009 5:34 PM EST

mojo-photo-springsteen-weareone.jpg

Artists and performers joined together for an inauguration concert today at the Lincoln Memorial, and despite the nearly unlimited potential for bombast at an event called "We Are One," it managed to be both restrained, mostly, and watchable, more or less. The concert opened with a rousing, moving rendition of Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising," with Bruce backed by a soaring gospel choir. It's a great song, but I must admit that for some reason I only started to get choked up later, weirdly, during John Mellencamp's "Pink Houses," which I never really liked but seemed to take on greater significance today. The footage of Marian Anderson singing on the same spot back in 1939 was also profoundly moving, but then, returning to the present, who pops up on stage as a contemporary? Ladies and gentlemen, Josh Groban. Ugh. But the camera cuts to Malia Obama, adorably taking a snapshot of Groban, Sasha demanding to see it.

Saying Goodbye to Bush... Literally

| Fri Jan. 16, 2009 6:55 PM EST

WB_023_9_farewell_bush_bg.gifPut this in the "creative marketing" file. Bliss Spa is offering an inauguration special, 20 percent off Brazilian bikini waxes for ladies who want to say "farewell to Bush" in more ways than one. I think I'll pass on Bliss's "presidential transition savings," but I speak for my uterus and myself when I say that we're truly pleased to see the last of Bush's presidency.

More Details Emerging on Indie 103.1's Demise

| Fri Jan. 16, 2009 4:31 PM EST

Indie 103.1The airwaves around Los Angeles are just a little emptier today, as Indie 103.1 is officially done, with Spanish music where the Buzzcocks used to be. We're getting some more details on what happened. First up, the LA Times had an interview yesterday with Chris Morris, a DJ who was recently let go from the station. He reminded us that Indie had retooled a few months back to be more mainstream in a last-ditch attempt to grab some ratings, but he reminisced about the station's heyday, saying the "amount of liberty I enjoyed was unbelievable." The Daily Swarm has an exclusive chat with Music Director Mark Sovell, who has some very interesting tidbits. First, while the station is currently advertising that it has moved to the web, it turns out that "none of the primary DJs or music programmers at the station are involved in the website and it's not being run by people who ran the station – there may be one person from the station." Maybe that explains why the web site has such screwy grammar: "LISTEN INDIE LIVE NOW!" He reveals that the whole announcement about not playing "the corporate radio game" any more is a farce, since none of the station employees had anything to do with it—the on-air treatise about "corporate radio" was read by the head of sales. However, he teases us a little, offering that "there are people who are making an effort to bring the station back on the air with the same people, but I can't say specifically." Good luck with that…

After the jump: is it the end of radio as we know it, and is that a bad thing?