Mixed Media

Friday Top Five: Beach House, 3Face, McLaughlin Grooves?

| Fri Mar. 7, 2008 3:54 PM EST

mojo-photo-top5mar7.jpg

1. Beach House – "Gila" (mp3 at The Line of Best Fit)
Turns out Baltimore doesn't just make thuddy syncopated club tunes with SpongeBob samples, it also boasts Velvet Underground-y duo Beach House, and this tune from their excellent new album Devotion is both delicate and dark.

2. 3face – "Different World" (All Star Remix) (buy it at iTunes)
Amazingly, the sped-up Four Tops sample isn't even the best thing about this new grime number from the London MC: it's the propulsive, ringing chords that push the verses along, urgent and hypnotic.

3. Andrew WK – "McLaughlin Groove" (listen at the Fair Game site)
Wow: turns out Andrew WK's bloody, raucous throwdowns fit right in with the long-running political talk show's bloody, raucous throwdowns. My mind is blown.

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Radio Now Below "Pamphlets" on the Media Ladder

| Thu Mar. 6, 2008 6:49 PM EST

mojo-photo-oldieradio.jpgFull disclosure: your ridiculously-named blogger spent 13 years working at a corporate alt-rock broadcaster, many of them happy. But my own ever-so-slightly bitter anti-radio bias is no match for the actual facts: things in the audio-only broadcast media are looking pretty terrible. The Radio Advertising Bureau just announced revenue figures for the industry in 2007, and they're down like a frown. Ad revenue was off 3% for the year over 2006, and in the 4th quarter, national revenue was down 11%. The only place radio showed some growth was "off-air" revenue, ironically enough, since isn't what's on-air the whole point? RAB President/CEO Jeff Haley tried to cover up the bad news by releasing a hilarious statement about "the nimbleness of the expanded radio space" and how it provides "a true 360-degree integration opportunity," before he collapsed into giggles and took another bong hit.

New (Leaked) Music: Gnarls Barkley - The Odd Couple

| Thu Mar. 6, 2008 4:58 PM EST

mojo-photo-gnarlsoc.jpgHey, look what leaked all over the internets, the new album from Gnarls Barkley. You remember them, they're the super-producer/mega-singer duo who got the highest score ever on that Hit Formula thing in the New Yorker? Well, they're back, and while their new album is, you know, enjoyable enough, with songs and notes and everything, I'm not sure they'd want to run it through the hit detector again: the score might be pretty disappointing.

Gayest Songs of All Time List Omits Morrissey, But Still Kind of Sad

| Wed Mar. 5, 2008 7:31 PM EST

mojo-photo-abba.jpgAs part of a celebration of the 30th anniversary of Sydney, Australia's legendary Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras, Australian website SameSame asked readers to vote on the "gayest songs of all time," and they've just announced the top 50 vote-getters today. It's pretty predictable, with lots of Madonna and Pet Shop Boys and Village People, plus since it's Australia there's about 14 Minogue songs (both Kylie and Dannii). You'd think maybe the Smiths' "I Want the One I Can't Have" might have snuck in there, but I guess this is Gay Pride, not Gay Horrible Shame and Misery. Here's the Top 20:

Bored I-5 Radio Listening Confirms: Rush Limbaugh a Complete Tool

| Mon Mar. 3, 2008 7:18 PM EST

mojo-photo-i5rush.jpgOther parts of the country may have rough roads, other far-flung cultures may have haunted paths of doom through dark forests, but we in California have the I-5, a straight-arrow 300-mile death-bahn connecting NorCal and SoCal. It's a harrowing journey through the dust-and-smog-filled wasteland of our dreaded Central Valley, chased by monstrous semis and LA douchebags on their cell phones doing 95. When one's driving it, like I did today, and one gets bored listening to stuff on the iPod-radio system, and turns with great trepidation to the radio, there are few options: lots of Spanish, lots of Jesus, and Rush Limbaugh. I settled on the latter, and it was an interesting day to tune in.

After Altamont, Mick Jagger Targeted For Death by Hells Angels

| Mon Mar. 3, 2008 4:40 PM EST

As the Rolling Stones learned at Altamont, be mindful of the company you keep. Mick Jagger's decision to hire members of the Hell's Angels to work security for the band's 1969 free concert at the speedway ended when a fan was stabbed to death by gang members, allegedly after drawing a gun and pointing it at the stage. (See footage above.) Jagger fired the Angels after the show.

That much is the stuff of rock-n-roll legend, but revelations about Altamont's aftermath are still making news. According to a BBC documentary, to be aired today, Jagger's decision to look elsewhere for security guards enraged the Angels, which hatched a plot to kill him. According to the BBC:

"They were going to kill him in retribution for his firing their security forces," former FBI agent Mark Young told the documentary.
"Their plan involved making entry onto his Long Island property, going by boat.
"As they gathered the weaponry and their forces to go out on Long Island Sound, a storm rolled up, which nearly sunk the watercraft that they were in, and they escaped with their own lives.
"They never went back and reinstituted the plan."

Unknown is whether the FBI ever informed Jagger of the plot. The singer has so far declined comment.

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LOST: Following the Money Trail

| Fri Feb. 29, 2008 8:01 PM EST

lost-the-constan.jpgWow, last night's episode of LOST was chock-full of action. There was a love story, time traveling, an art auction, even military exercises in the rain. It was almost as if the creators didn't feel they had enough time to pack everything into one episode.

Time, of course, is the key to the island and why our plucky survivors are still there instead of in balmy Los Angeles. The time difference—now established beyond a shadow of a doubt, though exactly how long it is is still to be determined—is why people are so keen to study the island, and also why it's so darn hard to get off it. But there's still the question of who knows about this time difference and what they are doing, or trying to do, to exploit it. To answer that question, let's use an old journalism maxim: follow the money.

Dance Beat Sneaking Back Into Hip-Hop

| Fri Feb. 29, 2008 1:32 PM EST

mojo-photo-snoop.jpgWhat I wanna do right here is go back: way back, back into time, to the early 1990s, and to a short-lived musical genre called "hip house." Bridging the sonic and cultural gap between the up tempo 4/4 beats of house music clubs in Chicago and Detroit with the energy and lyrical flow of New York hip-hop, the hybrid genre was everywhere for a brief moment. Artists like Fast Eddie and Mr. Lee threw down the party jams, while bands like A Homeboy a Hippie and a Funky Dread and Genaside pushed musical boundaries. And don't forget Technotronic! It seemed like the future, a musical genre that broke barriers of race and sexuality. So, what happened to it?

Is Collecting Records Stupid?

| Thu Feb. 28, 2008 6:19 PM EST

mojo-photo-beatles.jpgVia Uncut comes news that an exceedingly rare copy of the Beatles' 1968 "White Album" is set for auction this week, and is likely to bring bids of up to £5000 ($10,000). The record has a serial number of 00000007 (kind of like Mr. Burns' Social Security number) and since it's rumored that the first ten copies of the album were all given to band members, that would make this "the lowest numbered original mono copy" that has ever been up for auction. Is this silly, or a justifiable appreciation of a landmark work of art?

Study: Anything With a Beat Causes Sexism

| Mon Feb. 25, 2008 7:36 PM EST

mojo-photo-eminem.jpgVia AllHipHop.com, it's a study that appears to connect hip-hop to sexism, but not in the way you'd expect. Political science professors at North Carolina State University placed male and female students in three groups. One listened to Eminem's "Kill You" (representing the "misogynist" team: "Slut, you think I won't choke no whore/ 'til the vocal cords don't work in her throat no more?"), the second listened to the Beastie Boys' "Sabotage" (representing absence of misogyny: "I'm-a set it straight, this Watergate") and the third group "was not exposed to rap music." So did they play them Josh Groban, or just sit them in a quiet room? It doesn't say. Anyway, the study concluded that hip-hop music made people more sexist, no matter what the lyrics were about: