As expected, Bernie Sanders stopped by "Saturday Night Live" last night for a much-anticipated cameo alongside everyone's favorite impersonator of the Vermont senator, Larry David. The brilliant sketch featured David as the captain of a sinking ship, who attempts to get onto a lifeboat based on his one percent status. That's when Bernie Sanderswitzky steps in to put an end to preferential treatment and save the middle class.

"Sounds like socialism to me!" David's character says, to which Sanderswitzky clarifies, "Democratic socialism."

Watch the sketch below:

After several accounts surfaced of Donald Trump playing Adele's music at campaign events around the country, the pop megastar has finally stepped in to tell the world she never gave the GOP frontunner permission.

"Adele has not given permission for her music to be used for any political campaigning," her spokesman told the Independent on Monday, effectively asking the presidential hopeful to stop blasting her smash hits "Rolling in the Deep" and "Skyfall" to fire up crowds. 

This isn't the first time musicians have expressed disapproval of Trump for using their music. Back in June, when Trump first told the world he was running for president, Neil Young slammed him for playing "Rockin' in the Free World" for the announcement. Trump responded with characteristic Trumpiness:

(For the record, Neil Young "feels the Bern.")

But Trump might be a bit more disappointed by Adele's brush-off. The real estate mogul is a noted fan of the British singer: he even paused campaigning last November to attend the singer's one-night-only show in New York. According to several reports, Trump reportedly cut the line to get into the exclusive show.

As for Adele, this isn't the first time she has found herself tangled up in Republican politics. Just last week, Mike Huckabee released a head-scratching parody of "Hello." (Due to a copyright claim, the audio for the post was muted on YouTube, then un-muted.) She also credits former GOP vice presidential nominee and governor of Alaska Sarah Palin with launching her career in America, back in 2008.

On Friday, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences announced sweeping changes to its structural and voting process aimed at promoting diversity within the Academy and its governing entities—changes the Academy promises will double the number of women and "diverse members" by 2020.

"The Academy is going to lead and not wait for the industry to catch up," Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs said in a statement. "These new measures regarding governance and voting will have an immediate impact and begin the process of significantly changing our membership composition."

The announcement comes amid ongoing outrage sparked by this year's Oscar nominations, which failed to include a single person of color in its Best Film, Best Director, or its four major acting categories. The response quickly resulted in the social media campaign #OscarsSoWhite to call attention to the industry's diversity issues.

 

A photo posted by Lupita Nyong'o (@lupitanyongo) on

Shortly after the nominations were unveiled, Jada Pinkett Smith, Will Smith, and Spike Lee announced they were not going to attend this year's awards ceremony.

"The Academy reflects the industry, reflects Hollywood, and the industry reflects America, reflects a series of challenges that we're having in our country at the moment," Smith said. "There's a regressive slide towards separatism, toward racial and religious disharmony, and that's not the Hollywood I want to leave behind, that's not the industry, that's not the America I want to leave behind."

Read the Academy's full announcement here:

On Tuesday, 100 women of all ages from around the country participated in a six-hour livestream to tell personal abortion stories and provide a voice for women advocating reproductive rights. The live stream was hosted by the 1 in 3 campaign, a movement aimed at reducing the stigma around abortion. The organization's name comes from the fact that 1 in 3 women have had or will have an abortion at some point in their lives.

Former Texas Sen. Wendy Davis and Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards were among the women of all different backgrounds and ethnicities who spoke about the difficulty of making the decision, their access to care, and their feelings about their choice.

This is the second time 1 in 3 has hosted such an event. But Tuesday's live stream comes at a time when reproductive rights activists have been under fire in continued attacks against Planned Parenthood and its centers around the country following the release of deceptively edited and widely discredited videos that appeared to depict the organization selling fetal tissue—a practice that is illegal.

The live stream also focused on Whole Woman's Health v. Cole, an important abortion case that will be decided by the Supreme Court this year. For more on the monumental case, check out our explainer here.

Fresh off her word salad endorsement of Donald Trump yesterday, fellow reality star Sarah Palin on Wednesday found herself landing the cover page of one of New York's largest tabloids, the Daily News.

Her front-cover treatment was paired with the following headline:

It's great! Until you learn that Trump—still the Republican front-runner by a large margin—is now telling people that he is certain there "would be a role somewhere in the administration" for the former Alaskan governor if he were to win the White House come 2016. Watch that below:

Alan Rickman Dies at 69

Alan Rickman, the British film and theater actor known for his roles in movies such as Harry Potter and Die Hard, has died at age 69.

The Guardian reported that he had been suffering from cancer. Rickman's family confirmed the news and said he died in London "surrounded by family and friends."

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling reacted to news of Rickman's death on social media:

Actor Daniel Radcliffe, who played the lead role in the Harry Potter film series, also posted the following tribute:

 

For more than two decades, NFL owners seeking to finance new stadiums with public money used Los Angeles as a bargaining chip, threatening to move to the City of Angels if they didn't get what they wanted. Now St. Louis is losing its team to LA—and it still has years of multimillion-dollar payments left on its last bad stadium deal.

On Tuesday, the league's owners voted to let the St. Louis Rams move to Los Angeles for the 2016 season and to build what's supposed to be the NFL's biggest stadium on the site of a one-time racetrack. (The NFL also gave the San Diego Chargers a year to decide whether to join the Rams or work out a new stadium deal, and promised $100 million to the Chargers and Oakland Raiders if they stay put in their respective markets.) Los Angeles officials already have lauded the Rams' homecoming as an economic boost to the region; the state-of-the-art stadium in Inglewood, expected to open in 2019, could cost upwards of $3 billion, with the Rams likely playing in the Coliseum until then.

Meanwhile, the city and county of St. Louis will still pay at least $6 million apiece per year until 2021 to pay off bonds sold to construct and maintain the Edward Jones Dome, which opened in 1995. (The Rams paid a meager $500,000 per year to use the dome.) And then there's the more than $3 million in public funds used to develop a $1 billion riverfront stadium proposal to keep the Rams—a pitch NFL Commissioner Roger Gooddell knocked as "inadequate" and "unsatisfactory."

St. Louis officials have been quick to note that the city is searching for new tenants for year-round use and would review how much the loss will affect the area's finances. They won't, however, be looking for a new NFL franchise: Mayor Francis Slay told reporters Wednesday that the city is turning its back on the league, once and for all.

Fans pay final tribute at a mural in Brixton, London.

Rock and roll hall of famer David Bowie has passed away at the age of 69. Bowie's latest album, Blackstar‚Äč, was released on Friday (which was also his birthday). There was hardly any news of the musician's medical status before his passing, and many fans are beginning to wonder whether his last album was a dramatic farewell. 

 

Bowie's cause of death has not yet been formally established, but it has been reported that he had been battling cancer for the past 18 months.

Bill Cosby will face criminal charges for allegedly sexually assaulting Andrea Constand, a former Temple University employee, inside the comedian's Pennsylvania home in 2004.

Kevin Steele of the Montgomery County district attorney's office announced in a press conference Wednesday morning that Cosby is being charged with aggravated indecent assault. He is expected to be arraigned later this afternoon.

"Today, after examination of all the evidence, we are able to seek justice on behalf of the victim," Steele said.

This is the first time Cosby has been formally charged with sexual assault, after decades of ongoing rape allegations against the 78-year-old entertainer.

Below is a docket listing the charges filed against Cosby:

 

For more on the different statutes of limitations for filing rape or sexual assault charges in each state, head over to our explainer here.

Estately Blog

As 2015 winds down, the folks at real estate blog Estately have figured out which celebrities, news stories, and other topics of interest most captivated people across the United States this year. Using data from Google Trends, they identified the term each state Googled more than any other state over the course of the year. (They did the same thing in 2014—check out the map below to see how we've progressed, and see here for the full 2015 analysis.)

People in Wisconsin are evidently feeling a bit behind the times, wondering, "What does 'bae' mean?" (2015) and "What is Tinder?" (2014). Utah, caught with an embarrassing search history last year, wanted to learn more about transgender issues this year. And it's not clear what's going on in New Mexico, where people searched for "Pluto" in 2015 and "zombies" in 2014. See how your state compares with the rest, and happy Googling in 2016. (h/t The Daily Dot)

Estately Blog