Mixed Media

Watch Killer Mike's Passionate Speech on Michael Brown

| Tue Nov. 25, 2014 12:43 PM EST

Moments before a scheduled performance in St. Louis Monday night, Killer Mike of the rap duo Run The Jewels delivered an incredibly forceful speech about the news of a grand jury's decision not to indict Darren Wilson, the Ferguson officer who fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown more than three months ago.

"Tonight, I got kicked on my ass when I listened to that prosecutor. You motherfuckers got me. I knew it was coming, I knew when Eric Holder decided to resign, I knew it wasn't going to be good."

"I have a twenty-year-old son and I have a twelve-year-old son and I am so afraid for them," Killer Mike told the crowd, his voice cracked through held-back tears. "When I stood in front of my wife and I hugged her and I cried like a baby, I said 'These motherfuckers got me today.'"

The impassioned speech ended with a powerful reference to Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights leader's tragic death at the age of 39.

"I promise if I die when I walk off this stage tomorrow, I'm going to let you know it's not about race, it's not about class, it's not about color. It is about what they killed him for: It is about poverty, it is about greed, and it is about a war machine. It is us against the motherfucking machine."

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Map: Here's How #Ferguson Exploded on Twitter Last Night

| Tue Nov. 25, 2014 11:24 AM EST

On Monday evening, news of a grand jury's decision not to indict Ferguson officer Darren Wilson in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown erupted across social media. The announcement was made shortly after 8:20 PM CT and sparked massive protests around the country. The situation was particularly violent in and around the St. Louis area, with more than 60 people arrested overnight.

Using the hashtag #Ferguson, Twitter has mapped out how the conversation took place:

Following the announcement, Wilson's full testimony was released. One of the most controversial remarks included a description of Brown as looking like a "demon."

More from the chaotic scene:

Police gather on the street as protesters react after the announcement of the grand jury decision. Charlie Riedel/AP
Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown's mother, is comforted outside the Ferguson police department as St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch conveys the grand jury's decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of her son. Robert Cohen/AP
People watch as stores burn down. David Goldman/AP

 

Winnie the Pooh Banned From Playground For Wrong Reason

| Fri Nov. 21, 2014 11:23 AM EST

Goodmorning. Here is something stupid:

Winnie the Pooh has been banned from a Polish playground because of his “dubious sexuality” and “inappropriate” dress.

The much-loved animated bear was suggested at a local council meeting to decide which famous character should become the face of the play area in the small town of Tuszyn. But the idea soon sparked outrage among more conservative members, with one councillor even denouncing poor Pooh as a “hermaphrodite”.

“The problem with that bear is it doesn’t have a complete wardrobe,” said Ryszard Cichy during the discussion. “It is half naked which is wholly inappropriate for children."

“The author was over 60 and cut [Pooh’s] testicles off with a razor blade because he had a problem with his identity,” she said.

Here's the thing, Winnie the Pooh should be banned but not because he doesn't wear pants. He should be banned because he glamorizes stealing honey and tells children to play with bees. It's like he's never even seen My Girl.

This News Anchor Wore the Same Suit for an Entire Year and No One Noticed

| Thu Nov. 20, 2014 12:53 PM EST

Would you notice if your favorite newscaster wore the same outfit day after day for a whole calendar year? Based on an experiment conducted by Karl Stefanovic of Australia's Today program, the answer largely depends on whether the subject is a man or a woman.

Stefanovic recently revealed he had been doing just this, sporting the same blue suit for nearly every morning newscast for a year. But as he told his female co-anchors over the weekend, the stunt went virtually unnoticed. 

"I've worn the same suit on air for a year, except for a couple of times because of circumstance, to make a point," Stefanovic said. "I'm judged on my interviews, my appalling sense of humor – on how I do my job, basically. Whereas women are quite often judged on what they're wearing or how their hair is." 

Stefanovic's point is a well-documented problem. From the very lack of women represented in journalism to blatantly sexist coverage of female politicians, we're plagued with countless examples of sexist scrutiny playing out in the media. This experiment is yet another clear instance of such.

"No one has noticed; no one gives a shit. But women, they wear the wrong color and they get pulled up. They say the wrong thing and there's thousands of tweets written about them."

Stefanovic goes on to explain the experiment started as a show of solidarity with co-anchor Lisa Wilkinson, who says she is routinely criticized for her fashion choices by viewers. 

Watch below:

 

Grandmothers Smoke Pot for First Time, Play Jenga, Are Perfect

| Wed Nov. 19, 2014 7:23 PM EST

Here is a video of three grandmothers in Washington smoking pot for the first time. It is wonderful.

P.S. Smoking pot is legal in the Evergreen state so put your cuffs away.

(via HuffPo)

CNN's Don Lemon Tells Woman Accusing Bill Cosby of Rape She Could Have Bitten Her Way to Safety

| Wed Nov. 19, 2014 10:32 AM EST

Following weeks of renewed rape allegations against comedian Bill Cosby, CNN host Don Lemon wanted Joan Tarshis, who has accused Cosby of sexual assault, to know she could have escaped the alleged 1969 attack, if she had used her teeth as a weapon during oral sex.

Lemon, insisting he was not trying to be "crude," suggested this tactic while interviewing Tarshis on CNN Tonight:

Lemon: You know, there are way not to perform oral sex if you didn't want to do it.

Tarshis: Oh, I was kind of stoned at the time, and quite honestly, that didn't even enter my mind. Now I wish it would have.

Lemon: Right. Meaning the using of the teeth, right?

Tarshis: Yes, that's what I'm thinking you're....

Lemon: As a weapon.

Tarshis: I didn't even think of it.

Lemon: Biting.

Tarshis: Ouch.

Lemon: Yes. I had to ask. I mean, it is, yeah.

The awkward exchange followed an interview Tarshis gave to Lemon the day before, in which she claimed she had lied to Cosby about having an STD in order to convince him not to rape her. She alleged that Cosby then forced her perform oral sex on him. In the first interview, Lemon asked, "Why didn't you tell police?"

Update, Wednesday, November 19: Following the backlash incited by Lemon's comments, the CNN host issued the following statement Wednesday afternoon: "As a victim myself I would never want to suggest that any victim could have prevented a rape. If my question struck anyone as insensitive, I’m sorry as that was not my intention." In the past, Lemon has discussed being sexually abused as a child.

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Neil deGrasse Tyson Has Some Pretty Great Advice For This First Grader

| Tue Nov. 18, 2014 3:55 PM EST

A 6-year-old girl wearing a badass Albert Einstein t-shirt recently had the rare chance to ask everyone's favorite cosmologist, Neil deGrasse Tyson, what first graders like her can do to help the Earth. 

Tyson's response? Keep banging those pots, keep stomping in those muddy puddles.

"You are making a splash crater," Tyson explained. "These are experiments. Just tell your parents they're experiments and you want to become a scientist and they won't stop you from doing anything you want."

Basically, don't let the grown-ups squash your curiosity! Watch his heartwarming advice in full below:

 

 

Watch This Adorable Hamster Celebrate Thanksgiving Dinner Wearing a Pilgrim Hat

| Tue Nov. 18, 2014 2:48 PM EST

Adding to our collection of adorable creatures delightfully feasting away on autumnal foods, is a magical clip featuring a hamster nibbling away at Thanksgiving dinner with his closest furry friends. They all wear tiny Pilgrim hats and dine on equally tiny portions of pie and turkey, thanks to the folks at HelloDenizen, the creators of the video.

Just look at those cheeks.

(h/t Buzzfeed)

Love's New Album Is Finally Released—40 Years Late

| Mon Nov. 17, 2014 6:00 AM EST

Love
Black Beauty
High Moon

Fans have been waiting a long, long time for this one. The LA ensemble Love, best known for the 1967 folk-pop classic Forever Changes, assumed a variety of guises during its turbulent and intriguing history. On the band's 1966 debut, frontman Arthur Lee and company displayed a heavy debt to the Byrds, though his songwriting was too original to qualify the band as imitators. By the time Love recorded Black Beauty in 1973, Lee was the only remaining original member, and the sound echoed the psychedelic hard rock of his friend Jimi Hendrix.

While this previously unreleased album isn't a lost masterpiece, it's well worth hearing. The quartet is brawny and nimble at once, while songs like "Young & Able (Good & Evil)" and "Lonely Pigs" range from romance to meditations on social justice and race. (Like Hendrix, Lee was a black man navigating the predominantly white rock-and-roll world.) Lee subsequently experienced extreme ups and downs, including jail time in the '90s and an overdue celebratory comeback after his 2001 release from prison, before passing away in 2006. Black Beauty fills in a significant gap in his story.

Elevate Your Mood With the Cool Ghouls

| Mon Nov. 17, 2014 6:00 AM EST

Cool Ghouls
A Swirling Fire Burning Through the Rye
Empty Cellar

Psychedelic in the sense of "anything goes," as opposed to tired DayGlo nostalgia, San Francisco's Cool Ghouls project a sloppy party-going-overboard vibe that belies their considerable assets. This vibrant sophomore album was recorded by Sonny Smith, leader of Sonny and the Sunsets, and like that lovably slackerish crew, this snappy quartet uses a studied casualness to mask major pop smarts. Guitars veer abruptly from snarling fuzztones to folk-rock chimes and back, while the cascading three-part vocal harmonies are sunny exuberance exemplified, but never fussy or precise, and the songs are downright catchy. Recommended to fans of the Beau Brummels or Robyn Hitchcock—and anybody else needing a quick mood elevator.