While demonstrators yelled outside NBC's Manhattan television studios protesting his immigration policies, billionaire mogul and reality TV star Donald Trump became the first presidential front-runner to ever host Saturday Night Live. Starting with a self-aggrandizing and self-mocking monologue while flanked by two SNL Trump imitators, the presidential hopeful then starred in a sketch set in the oval office a year into his first term as president.

"I bought you the check for the wall," says the visiting President of Mexico. "Consider it an apology for doubting you." Syria is fixed. There's a new national anthem, and Ivanka Trump is having the Washington Monument plated with gold. "Wow, that's going to look so elegant," says Trump. Watch below:

And of course, there was Trump dancing to the internet thing of the moment, Drake's "Hot Line Bling":

Nearly a month after the Seattle Mariners fired manager Lloyd McClendon, the Washington Nationals on Tuesday ended Major League Baseball's brief period without a full-time black manager, when it hired veteran Dusty Baker. But as Mother Jones reported last week, the hiring of one black manager does little to solve the league's larger diversity problem in the coaching arena.        

Baseball's diversity problems go beyond the manager's seat, of course. For the last three decades, the percentage of African Americans in the big leagues has declined (though that figure has remained relatively flat at 8.3 percent in the last five years, leaving a pinch of hope). And while the Selig Rule was intended to surface more minority candidates for front-office positions, a mere 13 percent of general managers are people of color.

Major League Baseball will continue touting its international pipeline and its efforts to bring the sport back to kids in America's inner cities. But for now, managers of color may continue to feel, as McClendon told the New York Times in July, "like you're sitting on an island by yourself."

And now, Baker joins Atlanta Braves manager Fredi González on that island. You can read more about baseball's coaching diversity problem here.

Update, November 4, 2015: Kentucky voters elected Republican businessman Matt Bevin to office on Tuesday, potentially jeopardizing Medicaid expansion for roughly half a million people in the state. As John Oliver explained just a few days earlier, this is why all elections—local, gubernatorial, and presidential—matter. More on that below:

As he bluntly told Stephen Colbert a few weeks ago, John Oliver truly couldn't "give less of a shit" about Donald Trump or the 2016 election.

Yet, as the Last Week Tonight host lamented on Sunday, the national conversation remains fixated on presidential candidates, largely ignoring several key races that could ultimately determine the expansion of Medicaid and Obamacare in their states. It's an issue, according to Oliver, all Americans should pay close attention to, even if you don't live in one of these three states.

"There are American lives at stake here, because a number of these elections could determine whether hundreds of thousands of people remain in or even fall into what's known as the Medicaid gap," Oliver said.

"I know that sounds like a terrible clothing chain where you can buy khaki hospital gowns sewn by children in India, but amazingly, it's even worse than that."

Various Artists
Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll
Yep Roc

"Invented" might be a slight exaggeration, but Memphis, Tennessee's Sam Phillips discovered and/or produced some of the greatest voices in blues and early rock 'n' roll, releasing many of them on his own Sun Records label. This wonderful 55-track compilation illustrates the staggering range of electrifying music he midwifed, from Elvis Presley ("Mystery Train") and Jerry Lee Lewis ("Whole Lot of Shakin' Goin' On"), to Howlin' Wolf ("How Many More Years?") and B.B. King ("She's Dynamite"), to Carl Perkins ("Blue Suede Shoes") and Johnny Cash ("Big River"). Not to mention Roy Orbison, Ike Turner, Junior Parker, Charlie Rich, and many other lesser-known but vital performers. For newcomers, this is the perfect introduction to an essential body of work; for everyone else, it's merely a thoroughly satisfying collection.

Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll was compiled by journalist Peter Guralnick as a companion piece to his absorbing new book of the same name (to be published November 10 by Little, Brown, and Company). The author of the best biography of Elvis Presley to date, as well as a host of other excellent studies of American roots music, Guralnick is a captivating enthusiast and exhaustive researcher, who never lets a mastery of the facts obscure the visceral thrill of the art he celebrates. At 600 pages, his thoughtful account of Phillips' complex life is not for the casual reader, but it's hard to put down once you get started.

Donald Trump is not a self-made billionaire.

But speaking before ordinary Americans on Monday, the real estate mogul attempted to recast his widely known cushy beginnings by telling the story of a meager $1 million loan provided by his old man, Fred Trump.

"It has not been easy for me," he insisted.

On Wednesday, Stephen Colbert took Trump's humble roots to task by daring him to pay it forward to the kids at Harlem's Children Zone, a charity organization that helps disadvantaged youth in New York.

"Who knows, the kids you help might one day be so rich that they can blow their cash on a presidential campaign," the Late Show host said.

Last week, President Barack Obama traveled to West Virginia, a state that leads the nation in the number of fatal drug overdoses, to announce a new federal program aimed at tackling the country's growing opiate epidemic.

That same day, a West Virginia man was so moved by the president's speech, WSAZ reports, that he called 911 to seek help and turn in a "cooler full of drugs." The cooler reportedly included marijuana, 19 grams of ecstasy, and more than 150 pain killers.

He told authorities he had been watching Obama's announcement and hoped to become sober for his mother. No charges were filed.

"We applaud this person’s self-initiated efforts and wish him well in his recovery," a police statement read.

The man, whose name has not been released, was taken to get medical treatment. He chose to enter a rehabilitation center.

For more on the opiate crisis in West Virginia and the president's speech, head to our previous coverage here.

"I am hiding in the office. I don't want them to see me out there."

That's what a store employee at Schwanke-Kasten Jeweler told a 911 dispatcher last week, after becoming alarmed by the presence of four black men, one of whom was Milwaukee Bucks forward John Henson, who were attempting to enter the Wisconsin jewelry store to buy a Rolex.

The police recordings, which were released on Monday, first began on October 16 when Henson phoned the store to inquire about its closing hours. Convinced the voice on the other end of the line couldn't possibly belong to a "legitimate customer," the store employee alerted 911. Here's what the worker said, transcribed by NBC Milwaukee:

Store Employee: We just had a couple suspicious phone calls lately at this store, and we were just wondering if for the next hour, one of the Whitefish Bay cops could park in front of the store until we close.
911 Operator: What were the phone calls about?
Store Employee: They were just asking about what time they're going to close. They just didn't sound like they were legitimate customers.

When Henson and his friends arrived later that day, they were surprised to discover the store was already closed for the day. Unbeknownst to Henson, a police officer was also stationed nearby. The officer ran his vehicle plates and was unable to confirm the owner of the car.

Henson tried again a few days later, much to the employee's panic.

Store Employee: The officer told us if they came back, we're supposed to call again. They're at our front door now and we're not letting them in. I am hiding in the office. I don't want them to see me out there. We're pretending like we're closed. They're looking in the window. They're just kind of pacing back and forth. I don't feel comfortable letting them in. I just really don't at all.

Soon after police identified Henson, he publicized the incident with a message speaking out against racial profiling in a since-deleted Instagram. Just add it to the seemingly unending list of things you can't do while black—whether you are a professional athlete or not. 

You can listen to the 911 calls in their entirety below:

After a series of ads posted throughout San Francisco this week sparked the ire of both city residents and the internet, Airbnb on Thursday issued a company-wide apology to its employees for what many have described as an over the top passive aggressive ad campaign.

CNET reports marketing chief Jonathan Mildenhall said in an email the ads were "fundamentally inconsistent" with the company's ethos and told employees it would be working with the public organizations it "wronged to make this right."

"Yesterday I heard from so many of you about how embarrassed and deeply disappointed you were in us," CEO Brian Chesky also wrote. "You were right to feel this way."

After aggressively engaging in a long legal battle to avoid paying the city's 14 percent hotel tax, Airbnb was finally forced to shell out over $12 million in back taxes earlier this year. The ads, which debuted on Wednesday, featured messages directed towards various city agencies, including public libraries and the board of education, that offered suggestions for how each should use the money.

The messages immediately backfired:

The controversy comes two weeks before California voters will consider Proposition F, a ballot initiative that could significantly restrict the type of short-term rentals that Airbnb makes available in San Francisco.

In a Facebook post, an assistant professor at San Francisco University criticized the company for spending millions to fight the ballot measure. 

"I'm happy to hear that you paid your taxes this year. I did too! Isn't it awesome?," the post began. "However, had you donated that $8 million you spent fighting Proposition F directly to the public libraries you love so much, that could have made a bigger difference. Oh well. Hindsight is 20/20!"

The outrage also gave way to moments of levity, with internet users creating mock billboards to poke fun of Airbnb's now-infamous marketing debacle:

A corrupt former drug enforcement agent who played a central role in taking down the popular online drug bazaar Silk Road will serve six and a half years in prison for corruption, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Carl Mark Force IV pleaded guilty to extortion, money laundering, and obstruction of justice this past summer, after working for two years as an undercover agent for an interagency team tasked with identifying the owner of Silk Road. Force, who spent 15 years with the Drug Enforcement Administration, used his position in the investigation to swindle his way to a payout of more $700,000 in Bitcoin and a Hollywood contract. (Another member of the investigative team, ex-Secret Service Agent Shaun Bridges, also pleaded guilty over the summer to pocketing $820,000 from the accounts of Silk Road users.) Force has also been ordered to pay $340,000 in restitution.

In case you haven't been following the Silk Road case, here's a primer:

What exactly was Silk Road, again? Silk Road was a darknet marketplace that connected buyers and sellers dealing in a vast array of narcotics, false documents, weapons, and other contraband. "The idea was to create a website where people could buy anything anonymously, with no trail whatsoever that could lead back to them," creator Ross Ulbricht wrote in his journal. Users paid in Bitcoin—around $1.2 billion worth—and could only access the site using an anonymous internet browser called Tor. Ulbricht ran Silk Road using the moniker "Dread Pirate Roberts" from January 2011 until 2013, when he was caught red-handed at his laptop by a law enforcement sting in a San Francisco coffee shop.

Depending on whom you ask, the site was either a radical experiment in libertarian principles or "the most sophisticated and extensive criminal market on the Internet," as the criminal complaint against Force put it.

Ulbricht, who earned a commission on each transaction, was found guilty of drug trafficking, money laundering, and hacking, and he was sentenced to life in prison during the summer. At the sentencing hearing, the federal judge didn't hide her intention to make an example of Ulbricht: "What you did was unprecedented, and in breaking that ground as the first person you sit here as the defendant now today having to pay the consequences for that." Ulbricht's family, defense counsel, and supporters have mounted a public campaign to protest what they call a "draconian sentence."

Okay, but what does Carl Force have to do with all that? As the lead undercover cop for a Baltimore-based team of federal investigators, Force was in charge of communicating with Ulbricht. To that end, he created and used a fake persona, "Nob"—ostensibly a US drug smuggler—to make contact and gain Ulbricht's trust. In his communication with Nob, Ulbricht commissioned the murder of an employee, Curtis Green, whom he suspected of stealing Bitcoin from Silk Road accounts. (That money turned out to have been stolen by Bridges.) Force and the rest of the Baltimore team then staged the murder of Green. The incident was the first of six hits that Ulbricht has been accused of arranging, though those charges were not pursued in the final prosecution.

At what point did Force start breaking the law? In addition to Nob, Force created unauthorized personas, including "French Maid" and "Death from Above," which he used to extort more than $200,000 from Ulbricht in exchange for fake identification and inside information on the federal investigation. Because many of the communications were encrypted, it's impossible to tell whether the intelligence Force sold to Ulbricht was entirely junk, or whether he truly was a mole. What we do know is that once Ulbricht paid, Force has admitted to transferring the funds to a personal account, not a government one.

"Carl Force crossed the line from enforcing the law to breaking it," Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell said in a statement after Force's guilty plea, adding that the agent was "seduced by the perceived anonymity of virtual currency and the dark web."

That sounds like something straight out of The Shield. There's more: Force, who has invested heavily in Bitcoin since learning of it through the case, became the acting chief compliance officer at the Bitcoin company CoinMKT in 2013. There, he illegally seized more than $300,000 in assets from a user that the company had flagged for suspicious activity and transferred the money to his personal account.

And to top it all off, in March 2014, Force entered into a $240,000 contract with 20th Century Fox Film Studios for a film about the Silk Road investigation—without notifying his superiors.

Could this affect a potential appeal by Ulbricht? Yup. His defense attorney, Joshua Dratel, has indicated that the appeal will challenge the decision to ban any reference to the corruption from the courtroom. "We knew that the case agent who made the first contact with Dread Pirate Roberts was, in fact, entirely corrupt," Ulbricht's lawyer said following the sentencing. "We were prevented from using any of that at trial. That is going to be an issue." Dratel had previously called for a retrial after the corruption charges came to light, but the request was denied—in part because a second, concurrent investigative team based in New York was the one that ultimately busted Ulbricht, not the Baltimore team. The appeal, which has not yet been scheduled, will go before a panel of three judges in the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals.