Mojo - November 2007

Ron Paul: It's Slightly Less Real Than I Thought

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 11:19 AM PDT

ron_paul_elephant.jpgIllustration: Marc Burckhardt This is interesting. It appears that a portion of Ron Paul's online buzz is fake, and actually illegal. According to the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Spam Data Mining for Law Enforcement Applications project (quite a name, that), which looks at hundreds of thousands of spam emails a month and recently got its hands on some Ron Paul forwards, some of the email support for Paul is coming out of spambots.

The university project received Paul emails with subject headers like "Ron Paul Wins GOP Debate! HMzjoqO" and "Ron Paul Exposes Federal Reserve! SBHBcSO." According to Wired:

The e-mails had phony names attached to real-looking e-mail addresses. When lab researchers examined the IP addresses of the computers from which the messages had been sent, it turned out that they were sprinkled around the globe in countries as far away from each other as South Korea, Japan, the United Kingdom, Nigeria and Brazil."The interesting thing was that we had the same subject line from the same IP address, and it claimed to be from different users from within the United States," [project head Gary] Warner says.
One e-mail was designed to look as if it came from within a major Silicon Valley corporation, he notes. But when the researchers looked up the IP address, the computer from which the note was sent was actually in South Korea.

The emails, which actually include portions of Ron Paul's platform and recite many of the Paul talking points, apparently have been laundered through something called a botnet, which is illegal. The campaign has denied any knowledge of the phenomenon.

Okay. So here's the thing. The massive amount of support Ron Paul gets in the comments section of blogs across the internet can't be faked. (It was so extreme that Redstate.com went all Judge Dredd on its users and banned newbies from discussing Paul.) The money raised and the event turnout can't be faked.

So the well-intentioned Paul supporter who was trying to get his (or her) man's word out through this botnet operation probably did Paul more harm than good. The very real support Paul is getting can now be wrongfully dismissed as no more than internet shenanigans.

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Move Over Soldier of Fortune, Here's the New Mag for Mercs

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 9:53 AM PDT

serviam.gif

It was only a matter of time before an entrepreneurial publisher seized on the private military contracting boom—and all those untapped ad dollars—in order to give Soldier of Fortune, long the preeminent mag for hired guns, a run for its money. That time has arrived and the mag is called Serviam (Latin for "I will serve"). Edited by conservative author and think tanker J. Michael Waller and published by EEI Communications (whose president, James T. deGraffenreid, is a board member of Frank Gaffney's hawkish Center for Security Policy), the magazine bills itself as a provider of "accurate and actionable information about private sector solutions to promote global stability." Serviam is a sleeker, tamer version of SOF, which, like the companies it caters to, is seeking to soften the mercenary image, casting soldiers-for-hire as international peacekeepers.

Homies and Hospitals

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 9:40 AM PDT

Black people are so weird.

For some reason, which will no doubt take eons to figure out, blacks are those most likely to check themselves out of the hospital against medical advice:

In an analysis of more than 3 million discharges from U.S. hospitals in 2002, the researchers found that 1.4 percent were made against medical advice. Compared with white patients, African Americans were 35 percent more likely to opt for such a "self-discharge," the researchers report in the American Journal of Public Health.
In contrast, Hispanic patients were 10 percent less likely than whites to check out against medical advice...

It's unsurprising that men bolt more often than women and the young more than the old, but why blacks? The discrepancy holds true even when the researchers controlled for income (a brother can't lose his job) and Medicare/Medicaid receipt. Given that past studies (and common sense) indicate that going AWOL from the hospital is bad for your health, this is the kind of issue blacks should tackle as opposed to this one.

The Judge Gets Judged

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 9:31 AM PDT

Finally.

Philadelphia's Bar Association rebuked the judge who refused to punish a rapist since the victim was a prostitute. No comment from the judge but her lawyer put things nicely in perspective: ''The transcript doesn't necessarily tell the whole story,'' Bochetto said. He said Deni also considers a witness' tone of voice, demeanor and other factors in her rulings."

Can't imagine what those "other" factors were.

Just in Time For The Holidays, Blackwater's "Special Edition" Sig Sauer Handgun

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 8:25 AM PDT

226btcright_noband.jpg

Blackwater's recent troubles (the alleged indiscriminate killing of Iraqi civilians by the company's "independent contractors") have led to speculation that Erik Prince, Blackwater's founder and president, may seek to lead his company into new and perhaps less controversial lines of business. What better way to do that than by marketing a signature handgun? That's right, the embattled private military firm has apparently partnered with arms manufacturer Sig Sauer to offer a "Blackwater Special Edition P226," a 9mm handgun. According to the ad (posted to Wired's Danger Zone), "When personal protection of world leaders in high-risk environments is your job then you only want the best equipment." Run and get yours now while supplies last.

Ron Paul - It's Real, Get Over It

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 8:15 AM PDT

ron_paul_revolution.jpg

It's getting harder and harder for those fascists at Redstate to claim Ron Paul supporters are nothing more than "a bunch of liberals pretending to be Republicans." From Time:

Paul... is not only drawing impressive crowds (more than 2,000 at a postdebate rally at the University of Michigan last month) but also raising tons of cash. In the third quarter of 2007, Paul took in $5.3 million (just slightly less than GOP rival John McCain), mostly in small, individual donations. On Oct. 22, he aired his first TV ads, $1.1 million worth in New Hampshire.
The numbers are even more impressive considering that as of early October, 72% of GOP voters told Gallup pollsters they didn't know enough about Paul to form an opinion.

I'll say it again—insisting that Ron Paul supporters are liberals in disguise, as members of the right are doing, is a particularly pathetic blend of paranoia and denial, and it's only going come back to bite them in the rear. There is something real about Ron Paul (maybe it's the fact that Paul, as Frank Luntz says, is the candidate "the most likely to look at the camera during the debates and say, 'Hey, Washington, f____ you.'") that has tapped into the energy and enthusiasm of a bunch of voters that are internet-savvy, willing to donate, and politically educated. That's a group Republicans ought to be courting, not ostracizing.

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Just When We Thought We'd Heard the Last of Bernie Kerik

| Thu Nov. 1, 2007 7:38 AM PDT

Kerikmug.jpg
Remember Bernie Kerik, Rudy Giuliani's former business partner, driver, bodyguard and New York City police commissioner? Well, apparently Kerik incurred significant legal fees defending himself from charges that he he let a mob-connected company seeking city contracts renovate his New York City apartment for free. And now, reports the Wall Street Journal, the law firm Fulbright & Jaworski is suing Kerik for more than $200,000 in unpaid legal fees related to all the investigations.

Maybe Rudy's firm should quietly pick up the tab so Kerik can go back under a rock during the presidential election season. Much of the focus on Giuliani of late has been on his autocratic tendencies as mayor of New York, but his close relationship with Kerik remains one of his biggest vulnerabilities, right up there with the fact that he once married his cousin.