Mojo - March 2008

Petraeus: Iraq "Surge" Not Yielding Political Progress

| Fri Mar. 14, 2008 2:18 PM EDT

petraeus_med.jpg

When David Petraeus and Ryan Crocker, respectively the top U.S. commander and diplomat in Iraq, testified before Congress last September, they effectively defused what at the time were rising Democratic calls for an immediate withdrawal from Iraq. The men spent days on the Hill, responding deftly to loaded questions from hostile members of Congress about the progress of the "surge" and whether last year's increase in troop levels was giving way to political reconciliation in Baghdad—the stated of goal of putting more U.S. troops on Iraqi streets. The witnesses did their best to put a positive spin on things, rightly pointing out that, for the moment, violence in Iraq had plunged to levels not seen since shortly after the 2003 invasion. Together, they urged patience in the hope that the decline in killings might soon translate into political progress.

Petraeus is set to testify again next month, and if his recent comments to the Washington Post are any indication, this time he may bring a different message. "No one feels that there has been sufficient progress by any means in the area of national reconciliation," the general told reporters during an interview in Baghdad's protected International Zone.

From the Post:

The Shiite-led government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has won passage of some legislation that aids the cause of reconciliation, drawing praise from President Bush and his supporters. But the Iraqi government also has deferred action on some of its most important legislative goals, including laws governing the exploitation of Iraq's oil resources, that the Bush administration had identified as necessary benchmarks of progress toward reconciliation.

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McCain's Support for Honest Contracting Costs Jobs

| Fri Mar. 14, 2008 1:17 PM EDT

boeing_tanker.jpg The story of how John McCain backed a European-based plane maker named EADS over American-based Boeing for a $35 billion Pentagon contract to make air tankers is swirling around the internet. Additional juice for the story comes from the fact that McCain was richly rewarded by EADS for his actions in the form of campaign contributions, and the fact that a handful of McCain campaign staffers are current or former EADS lobbyists ("They never lobbied him related to the issues," said a spokesperson).

The appearance of favoritism obviously isn't good for the man who made his career crusading against Washington's politics as usual. But let's focus for a second on the fact that McCain sent $35 billion overseas while the American economy is struggling and jobs are in short supply.

If McCain feels that the federal government should select the bidder who offers the best product at the best value (and shun the bidder who just four or five years ago tried to game the federal government out of billions of dollars, as Boeing did), I understand that. In fact, I think I agree with it. The federal government spends wisely and though an American company didn't get the gig, its failure this time around will urge it to become more competitive in the future. And the whole thing certainly beats the no-bid contracts that have become so common during the Bush Administration.

But McCain has to be honest about the fact that his decision to push business to EADS instead of Boeing comes at a price here at home. At a campaign stop in early March, McCain said of the deal, "I think the bulk of that manufacturing and those jobs will be here in the United States of America." He wasn't being straightforward with his listeners. According to a Business Week analysis done by speaking to EADS and Boeing about their proposals, the Boeing contract would have created 17,000 more domestic jobs. And though the EADS contract does create some jobs in America, it does so in 2010 and later, as opposed to immediate job creation under Boeing.

Here's a comparison:

EADS Boeing
Jobs Created or Supported in U.S. Roughly 27,000 44,000
Locations Mobile, AL 300 suppliers in 40 states
When In U.S. starting in 2010 or 2011; starting immediately in France Starting immediately in U.S.

In the Democratic race, this is the sort of thing that would get a candidate killed in Ohio or Pennsylvania, where America's industrial infrastructure is rusting to the screws. But McCain is coasting along uncontested while the Democrats beat on each other, meaning that stories like this one don't get noticed. But McCain better hope that there aren't other examples like this that pop up in September and October, or Bush's failing economy, which is already a burden to McCain's electoral chances, will haunt him further.

John McCain Vote Skipping Leads to Laughable Hypocrisy

| Fri Mar. 14, 2008 12:29 PM EDT

Everyone knows that John McCain skips more votes in the Senate than just about anyone, once going five straight weeks without voting.

The media doesn't make that big of a deal out of McCain's habit of skipping out on his day job, but this newest development can't be ignored. McCain went before a Philadelphia town hall today and called for action on law enforcement, worker education, and VA health care. But just yesterday he missed votes in the Senate that remedied problems in these three areas. See the details, after the jump:

More Bad News For Bush's Judicial Nominee

| Fri Mar. 14, 2008 11:53 AM EDT

What with his deep connections to Dick Cheney and the endorsement of lots of home-state Republicans, Gus Puryear IV should have been a shoe-in for his nomination to a federal trial court in Tennessee. But not only has Puryear run into trouble over his membership in an exclusive country club, but this week, Time magazine and the Tennessean have both published critical stories about him alleging that he abused the attorney-client privilege to prevent the release of damaging information about his employer, the Corrections Corporation of America, the nation's largest private prison company.

A former CCA employee has written to the Senate Judiciary Committee outlining his allegations that Puryear tried to prevent employees from giving other government entities the full details about prison riots, unexplained deaths and other negative events to which they were entitled, for fear that the information could be used in lawsuits or that it might threaten the company's government contracts. If true, it's not a pretty picture, and it might be damaging enough to make Puryear one of the rare trial court nominees to face a bona fide confirmation fight.

Day Three: No Straight Talk from McCain on Parsley's Call for Destroying Islam

| Fri Mar. 14, 2008 11:14 AM EDT

mccain-rod-parsley250x200.jpg No call back from the McCain camp yet.

For the third day in a row, I've called Jill Hazelbaker, the communications director for the McCain campaign, seeking a comment on televangelist Rod Parsley's call for destroying Islam. McCain, as I reported on Wednesday, has campaigned with this politically influential megachurch pastor, has accepted his endorsement, and has praised him as a "spiritual guide." And I've been told--once again--she is unavailable.

McCain and his campaign will not say anything about Parsley's advocacy of a Christian war against Islam that seeks to eradicate what Parsley dubs a "false religion."

Where's the straight talk now?

Tier 1, Tier 3, and the Perp Walk Between

| Thu Mar. 13, 2008 4:50 PM EDT

Spitzer is teaching us a lot about the habits of men who pay for sex, the savvy of the tech-age women who provide it, and about the super-rich and their...hangers-on. Who knew Econ 101 would come in so handy?

According to Slate, when Giuliani drove hookers off the streets, he just drove them inside. There, the savvy ones, the ones who'd never populate street corners, saw their prices skyrocket; middle class men could cruise the personals and escort ads, rather than stroll in vice squad territory. Though figures are obviously difficult to come by, Bob from Accounting seems to be venturing online for sex a hell of a lot more often than he was willing to go down by the docks, and today's computer-savvy working girls are making him pay through the nose for greater invisibility. Did any of Giuliani's whiz kids see this coming?

Of course, once the average guy started ponying up for call girls, the super-rich had to up the ante. Now, it's not unusual for men to put their favorites on $10,000 per month retainers, or pay $10K per "session." Apparently, paying a year's worth of private school tuition for an hour of sex is the new diamond-encrusted yacht. Let's see Joe Average get one of these! According to the Wall Street Journal:

"...a sizable percentage of the super wealthy use escorts. [Researchers] surveyed 661 people who owned private jets, and found that 34% of males and 20% of females had paid for sex."

"The most popular reason was "unique experiences" (71%), followed by "higher quality experiences" (57%). Conventional wisdom says that the rich visit escorts to avoid messy break-ups or extra demands for cash. But the study shows otherwise: "No strings attached," ranked last as a reason."

"With the wealthy," Mr. Prince says, "it's all about power and control and new experiences."

Or maybe it's just about conspicuous consumption, since sex seems to be an afterthought. Writes the Slate sociologist, who's studying high-end prostitutes in New York:

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Confirmation Battle Brewing Over Nominee's Country Club Membership

| Thu Mar. 13, 2008 3:49 PM EDT

Most ambitious lawyers know that if they want to become a federal judge, they have to fulfill several key requirements. First, they must schmooze the right people, sit on the right bar committees, and make the requisite political contributions. Then, above all, they must 1) pay nanny taxes, and 2) wait until after securing a lifetime appointment to join an exclusive, discriminatory country club.

Gustavus Adolphus Puryear IV, Bush's choice for a trial court seat in the middle district of Tennessee, had ticked off most of the items on the list by the time he was nominated last summer. He'd given money, befriended Dick Cheney's son-in-law, and even prepped Cheney for the vice-presidential debates in 2000 and 2004. But he forgot about rule number 2, an oversight that might be his undoing.

As a prison company lawyer with virtually no litigation experience, Puryear's resume offers any number of reasons why he shouldn't be confirmed. But inexperience has never stopped the politically connected from ascending to the bench. Country club memberships, however, are a different matter. And Puryear happens to be a member of the exclusive Belle Meade Country Club in Nashville, a club whose racist history is so well known that even former Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist had the good sense to quit the club before running for office.

Interesting Numbers From New Poll: Lookin' Good for Dems

| Thu Mar. 13, 2008 1:54 PM EDT

There's a new NBC/WSJ poll out today that has lots of interesting numbers. A stunning 76% of respondents say they want a president who brings a different approach than Bush. Democrats lead by double digits in a generic presidential contests. Confusingly, McCain only trails Obama by 3 points and Clinton by two, but that's likely because, according to the poll, many independents and Democrats have bought the spoon-fed Maverick myth. A little reeducating by the Democrats in the fall should drive McCain closer to the results of a "generic Republican."

Half of respondents think leadership style and trustworthiness are the most important attributes in a candidate, while just one-third prioritize ideas and policies. That's good news for Obama, because on almost every issue polled, Clinton is seen as the better candidate.

Bill Clinton's favorability/unfavorability ratings have plummeted to a net negative: 42%/45%. It's pretty undeniable that this election has tarnished his legacy.

And finally, there is evidence Obama is not making progress in his fight to clear up confusion about his faith. Here's MSNBC:

The percentage of respondents who correctly identified Obama as a Christian increased from 18% to 37%. But those identifying him as a Muslim also increased five points (from 8% to 13%).

Hate Your Boss? So Does This Reporter

| Thu Mar. 13, 2008 12:27 PM EDT

If you can stomach one minute and thirty seconds of a tenant/landlord dispute over an elevator in New York City, you're in for a treat. Because this video ends with a hilarious 15 second on-air argument between a reporter and an anchor that is very personal. Poor Ollie. He's not the boss of anyone anymore.


http://view.break.com/467869 - Watch more free videos

Why is this a news story anyway? And did the landlord's representative throw in a fist pump at the end of the interview? (H/T The Plank)

Obama Campaign Tries Sarcasm

| Thu Mar. 13, 2008 11:52 AM EDT

In all of its recent interactions with reporters, the Obama campaign has had a certain attitude: "We've won the most votes, the most delegates, and the most states! It's almost mathematically impossible for Clinton to come back. How can you continue to portray this as a close race??"

But the Clinton campaign isn't backing down an inch, and it's in the media's interest to keep reporting this thing like it's a dogfight, so the Obama staffers aren't getting the response they want. They're trying a new approach: making fun of the Clinton campaign. They took a recent Clinton campaign memo to reporters and added their own comments in bold, then shot it out to everyone on their media email list. See it, after the jump. Parts of it are funny, parts of it are just snarky and mean. I wonder if BHO himself signed off on this. Somehow I doubt it.