Mojo - May 2008

Obama Gets Hit By a Gravelanche

| Fri May 2, 2008 12:40 PM EDT

I don't know that Obama rebounds from this devastating attack.

Mike Gravel is the gift that keeps on giving. More Gravel-based video amusement here and here.

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Wow, Kentucky, I Don't Know What to Say...

| Fri May 2, 2008 12:30 PM EDT

George Packer takes a stroll down Kentucky way.

On Wednesday, I was in Inez, Kentucky, the Appalachian town where L.B.J. declared war on poverty forty-four years ago this month. John McCain was on a tour of "forgotten places," and had come to Inez to let the coal miners and town notables know that he will be the President of all Americans.... After his speech, I left the county courthouse and crossed the main street to talk to a small group of demonstrators holding signs next to McCain's campaign bus. J. K. Patrick, a retired state employee from a neighboring county, wore a button on his shirt that said "Hillary: Smart Choice."
"East of Lexington she'll carry seventy per cent of the primary vote," he said. Kentucky votes on May 20. "She could win the general election in Kentucky." I asked about Obama. "Obama couldn't win."
Why not?
"Race," Patrick said matter-of-factly. "I've talked to people—a woman who was chair of county elections last year, she said she wouldn't vote for a black man." Patrick said he would't vote for Obama either.
Why not?
"Race. I really don't want an African-American as President. Race."

That's a Democrat speaking! More after the jump...

Nelson Mandela on U.S. Terrorist Watch List

| Fri May 2, 2008 10:43 AM EDT

mandela.jpg A sign that perhaps things have gotten out of control.

Nobel Peace Prize winner and international symbol of freedom Nelson Mandela is flagged on U.S. terrorist watch lists and needs special permission to visit the USA. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice calls the situation "embarrassing," and some members of Congress vow to fix it.
The requirement applies to former South African leader Mandela and other members of South Africa's governing African National Congress (ANC), the once-banned anti-Apartheid organization. In the 1970s and '80s, the ANC was officially designated a terrorist group by the country's ruling white minority. Other countries, including the United States, followed suit.

The terrorist watch list has been, at times, a comedy of errors. Ted Kennedy was on it, as was civil rights hero and Georgia congressman John Lewis. A Marine returning from Iraq found his homecoming delayed because he was on the watch list. Babies have routinely had problems. The artist formerly known as Cat Stevens, now known as Yusuf Islam, is famously on the watch list, and Catherine ("Cat") Stevens, wife of Senator Ted Stevens, has had trouble when flying as a result. 60 Minutes once did a segment that featured a group interview with 12 Robert Johnsons, all of whom routinely had trouble boarding airplanes.

The DOJ reported in April 2007 that the terrorist watch list includes 700,000 names, and is growing by 20,000 a month. The ACLU is hosting a countdown to July, when it anticipates the one-millionth name will be added. "Small, focused watch lists," it points out, "are better for civil liberties and for security."

MoJo Wins National Magazine Award

| Thu May 1, 2008 10:48 PM EDT

ellie_NMA.jpg
Think Academy Awards, red carpet, black tie. In the magazine world, top honors come not as Oscars, but as Ellies, and they're awarded by the American Society of Magazine Editors. At tonight's National Magazine Awards in New York Mother Jones won the 2007 award for General Excellence (100,000 to 250,000 circulation). (Check out the year's issues here.)

We beat out the respectable company of Foreign Policy, Paste, Radar, and Philadelphia. More on the winners and nominees (Mother Jones was also nominated for Lana Slezic's photo essay on the women of Afghanistan) here.

And thanks to all our readers for your support. Expect more excellence to come!

Are Today's Student Activists Lazy?

| Thu May 1, 2008 7:41 PM EDT

We want the lowdown on student activism, past and present. Been arrested and regret it? Would your school win the prize for silliest student protest? Was student activism way better when you were in school? Is your cause unique?

Help us put together our best student activism roundup yet. It's our 15th annual! Check out last year's. Answer a few quick questions and you could win some cool prizes.

Click here to begin!

NYC's New Reefer Madness

| Thu May 1, 2008 7:04 PM EDT

A new study shows that New York is targeting youth of color for marijuana possession. This offensive is also designed to build a Big Brother database (Think: Counterterrorism, with inner city youth as the terrorists and objects of legitimate fear.) If you weren't already terminally suspicious of society's need to criminalize black and brown youth, read on.

"Marijuana Arrest Crusade," a study by Queens College sociology professor Harry Levine and drug-law-reform activist Deborah Peterson Small paints an ugly and fascist picture of life in George Bush's wiretapping, profiling, presumed guilty-by-association-if-swarthy 2008. From the Village Voice:

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George W. Bush: Most Disapproved of President in History

| Thu May 1, 2008 4:08 PM EDT

It's official: George W. Bush is the most unpopular president since pollsters have been able to track presidential popularity.

According to a CNN/Opinion Research poll, 71 percent of Americans disapprove of Bush's presidency. Harry Truman hit 66 percent in January 1952. But no president had cracked the 70-percent mark--until now.

The good news for Bush: he has a 28 percent approval rating. Truman fell as low as 22 percent, and Richard Nixon bottomed out at 24 percent. So though he's the most disapproved of president in history, Bush has a ways to go before he's the least approved of president in history. But that's not out of reach. There are nine months left in his presidency.

Obama: Is He Slipping?

| Thu May 1, 2008 3:36 PM EDT

Barack Obama has a lead in pledged delegates and in all likelihood will end the primaries with more voter-determined delegates than Hillary Clinton. He's picking up superdelegates at a quicker pace than Clinton. He's ahead in the popular vote. Yet.....If one looks at the recent media coverage and the latest polls, it's hard not to wonder if Obama is losing altitude--and doing so at a dangerous rate. The media narrative of the race in the past month has been dominated by Wright and Bittergate. Do voters care about this stuff? Pundits and analysts argue--and wonder--about this. It's hard to tell how much of a connection exists between what appears on cable news shows--which only a few million Americans watch each night--and how voters view politics and render decisions.

As for the polls, it's always perilous to pay too much attention to them. But the latest polling data from both North Carolina and Indiana all point in a direction troubling for Obama. In early April in North Carolina, he led Clinton by 10 to 23 points in various surveys. Now, he has a 7-point edge. In Indiana, three recent polls have Clinton ahead by 5, 8, and 9 points.

Could Obama be sinking? Does he need a game-changer after the Wright to-do and the bitter "bitter" fuss? For political analysts, it is always tempting to overreact. That's what pundits and commentators do. It makes for better columns and better TV. Perhaps he'll do fine in North Carolina and Indiana, with voters in these states embracing him for the same reasons millions of Democrats elsewhere have done. But what if Obama truly is slipping and manages only to limp across the finish line? That's obviously what Clinton and her crew are betting on. And such an end to the primaries could lead to protracted political warfare within the Democratic Party. One question is, what can she really do if he ends up with more pledged delegates? But the flip side is, can he keep hope alive if he closes weakly?

Gas Tax Follies: Obama and Clinton Camps Spar

| Thu May 1, 2008 3:25 PM EDT

On dueling conference calls from the Obama and Clinton campaigns today, the gas tax holiday that has gotten so much play (read: condemnation) in the press was the major topic.

The gas tax holiday would eliminate the 18-cent tax on each gallon of gas over the course of the summer; experts, economists, and editorialists have all pointed out that oil companies can simply add 18 cents to the price of each gallon, making savings for consumers nonexistent or nearly nonexistent. To prevent the oil companies from profiting, Senator Clinton has suggested accompanying the holiday with a tax on the oil companies. Even Clinton backers have admitted that this would simply mean cash would go into one of Exxon's pockets and out the other.

Simply put, the gas tax holiday is a pander to cash-strapped voters who want to hear a presidential candidate sound like he or she cares about their burdens. Obama campaign manager David Plouffe called it a "metaphor for the entire campaign." It's a short-term fix — even if oil companies don't negate the tax cut by raising prices, the estimated savings is under $100 for the summer — which Plouffe claimed would distract Americans from the long-term solutions that will constitute a legitimate energy policy. The whole situation, said Plouffe, is "emblematic of what we need to change."

Play the Veepstakes Game!

| Thu May 1, 2008 1:34 PM EDT

The good folks at CQ Politics have assembled a list of the 32 politicians most likely to be John McCain's VP choice and have put them in a bracket. You can vote on who advances from each round. If you have no problem with momentarily trivializing one of the most important choices we make as a country (and quite literally turning politics into a game), go try it out. I did.

By the way, the 32 candidates include four women, five people of color, and 24 white dudes. Considering the state of the modern GOP (no African-Americans in Congress), that's not bad. The fact that Condi is involved really boosts their diversity numbers.