Google to Set a Porn King Free, In Court?

| Tue Jun. 24, 2008 10:50 AM EDT

A novel defense in an obscenity case, down in Florida:

Judges and jurors who must decide whether sexually explicit material is obscene are asked to use a local yardstick: does the material violate community standards?
That is often a tricky question because there is no simple, concrete way to gauge a community's tastes and values.
The Internet may be changing that. In a novel approach, the defense in an obscenity trial in Florida plans to use publicly accessible Google search data to try to persuade jurors that their neighbors have broader interests than they might have thought.
In the trial of a pornographic Web site operator, the defense plans to show that residents of Pensacola are more likely to use Google to search for terms like "orgy" than for "apple pie" or "watermelon." The publicly accessible data is vague in that it does not specify how many people are searching for the terms, just their relative popularity over time. But the defense lawyer, Lawrence Walters, is arguing that the evidence is sufficient to demonstrate that interest in the sexual subjects exceeds that of more mainstream topics — and that by extension, the sexual material distributed by his client is not outside the norm.

The defense attorney isn't just freeing a porn king; he's holding up a mirror to our lives: "Time and time again you'll have jurors sitting on a jury panel who will condemn material that they routinely consume in private," he told the press. The Google data will expose "how people really think and feel and act in their own homes."

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