Ivins Accused FBI of Stalking; Investigation Details Forthcoming, Says FBI

| Wed Aug. 6, 2008 10:25 AM EDT

In the absence of specific evidence linking Bruce Ivins to the anthrax attacks, there is gathering speculation that the FBI's case against him might not be as strong as first thought. To be sure, the circumstantial case is there, but Steven Hatfill will tell you: circumstantial evidence doesn't always lead in the right direction. According to NPR, the Department of Justice could be preparing to put doubts to rest by releasing the details of its case against Ivins, perhaps as early as today.

In the meantime, reports are emerging that before his suicide Ivins had accused the FBI of stalking him and his family. This included, Ivins claimed, offering his son $2.5 million to give evidence against Ivins and attempting to turn his hospitalized daughter against him. From the Associated Press:

Ivins complained privately that FBI agents had offered his son, Andy, the money plus "the sports car of his choice" late last year if he would turn over evidence implicating his father in the 2001 anthrax attacks, according to a former U.S. scientist who described himself as a friend of Ivins.
Ivins also said the FBI confronted Ivins' daughter, Amanda, with photos of victims of the anthrax attacks and told her, "This is what your father did," according to the scientist, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
The scientist said Ivins was angered by the FBI's alleged actions, which he said included following Ivins' family on shopping trips.
The FBI declined to describe its investigative techniques of Ivins.

UPDATE: The Justice Department has released a file of court documents related to the investigation. Read them for yourself.

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