WikiLeaks Gets A Facelift

| Wed May 19, 2010 4:58 PM EDT

There's a lot of people who'd like to shut down WikiLeaks, the now-famous whistleblower site that recently posted video of two journalists being gunned down by a US helicopter in Iraq. But so far, the only group that's ever taken down WikiLeaks is WikiLeaks itself. Earlier this year, the site's giant repository of leaked documents (and most of its mirror sites) went dark as part of a $600,000 fundraising drive. It was a bit ironic, considering that one of WikiLeaks' claims to fame is that once it posts a document, "it is essentially impossible to censor." For more than five months, if you wanted to peruse its exclusive stash of Scientology tracts, Sarah Palin's hacked emails, or Guantanamo detainee manuals, you were out of luck.  

Now the fundraiser is over and WikiLeaks' main site has emerged from hibernation. All the old documents appear to be there. But there are some notable changes. When MoJo contributor David Kushner was profiling WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, he contacted some of the people named as advisors on the previous version of the WikiLeaks site; they said they didn't know why they'd been listed there. The new site does not list any advisors.

Get Mother Jones by Email - Free. Like what you're reading? Get the best of MoJo three times a week.