Mojo - February 2011

Mubarak's Horrific Human Rights Legacy

| Tue Feb. 1, 2011 6:00 AM EST

Editor's note, 6/19/12: Hosni Mubarak, sentenced to life in prison this month and in deteriorating health, was reportedly put on life support in an Egyptian military hospital on Tuesday. (Reuters initially reported that Mubarak been declared "clinically dead" by Egyptian authorities.) Below is an overview of his brutal legacy, as Egyptians ousted him from power in spring 2011.

Cario has been ablaze for the past week. As the Egyptian people have faced expired tear gas (from cans stamped "Made in America"), army tanks, water hoses, bullets, and imprisonment, it is important to know just how bad this United States-supported dictator is. Below, some examples of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's misdeeds which illustrate nicely why so many Egyptians want him out for good.

Torture

Mubarak is most well-known among human rights advocates as a serious offender of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Convention against Torture [PDF], and Egypt's own constitution. The offenses are innumerable:

  • The Egyptian Organization of Human Rights reports that between 1993 and December 2008, 460 torture cases were reported, with 167 cases of death due to torture or ill-treatment.
  • The families of suspects are often tortured to extract information about suspects. One account from 2008 reports that after police officers burst into the home of an absent suspect, they attacked his pregnant sister instead—with a baseball bat. She fell over a flight of stairs and died.
  • Mubarak has a long and comfortable relationship with hosting and torturing detainees for the United States and the U.K., an arrangement  often overseen by Mubarak's newly-appointed Vice President Omar Suleimen.
 

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We're Still at War: Photo of the Day for February 1, 2011

Tue Feb. 1, 2011 5:30 AM EST

U.S. Army Sgt. Robert Smith, 2-502, 101st Airborne Division talks to Afghans before the Cash for Work Program starts outside Stronghold Dog, Afghanistan, Jan. 29, 2011. The program provides partnership with the local community by providing income for day labor and the turning in of unexploded ordinances. ISAF photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Joseph Swafford