Mother Jones' Josh Harkinson reported earlier today that the Trump campaign selected white nationalist leader William Johnson as a delegate in California.

Trump campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks just issued this statement about it to the Washington Post:

Yesterday the Trump campaign submitted its list of California delegates to be certified by the Secretary of State of California. A database error led to the inclusion of a potential delegate that had been rejected and removed from the campaign’s list in February 2016.

Read Harkinson's full story.

UPDATE, 5:48 p.m. ET: "Database error" was apparently the Trump campaign's second attempt at an explanation.

Today is Cinco de Mayo, and here's what presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump tweeted to celebrate the occasion:

 

Stop tweeting. 

Ted Cruz may be mathematically eliminated from clinching the Republican presidential nomination before the convention, but that didn't stop the Texas senator from announcing a running mate on Wednesday: Carly Fiorina, the former CEO of Hewlett-Packard. Fiorina, who dropped out of the Republican presidential race after the New Hampshire primary and previously lost a US Senate race in California, is a notable pick not just because she is a woman, or because she previously criticized Cruz for saying "whatever he needs to say to get elected," but because of her past experience—she would be the first vice president in 76 years to have ascended to the post without previously holding elected office.

The last time a major party picked a vice presidential nominee without legislative or gubernatorial experience was in 1972, when Democrat George McGovern chose Sargent Shriver, who had previously run the Peace Corps and worked on President Lyndon Johnson's "war on poverty." But you have to put an asterisk next to that, since Shriver was chosen only after McGovern's original running mate, Sen. Thomas Eagleton, resigned amid reports about his previous mental health treatments. Four years earlier, Alabama Gov. George Wallace selected as his running mate Air Force General Curtis LeMay, but Wallace, a longtime Democrat, had chosen to run (and lose) under the American Independent Party.

To find a running mate with no experience in elected office who actually won, you have to go back to 1940, when Franklin D. Roosevelt named Agriculture Secretary Henry Wallace as his second vice president, following eight years of John Nance Garner. Prior to that, Calvin Coolidge tapped Charles Dawes, President Warren Harding's budget director, to be on his victorious ticket in 1924. Dawes had lost a Senate race 23 years earlier and written a hit song in the interim, before being dragged into the executive branch. Dawes himself seemed to recognize his lack of qualifications. "I don't know anything about politics," he said after being selected as Coolidge's running mate. "I thought I knew something about politics once. I was taken up on the top of a 20-story building and showed the promised land—and then I was kicked off."

But okay, both of those vice presidents had some experience in the executive branch. The last true outsider to win was in the 19th century. Prior to becoming James A. Garfield's running mate in 1880, Chester A. Arthur had no political experience other than stints as port collector of New York City and chairman of the state Republican Party. In a nice bit of symmetry with Cruz's campaign, Arthur's future presidential campaign was marred by allegations that he was ineligible because he was born in Canada.

A day after losing to Hillary Clinton in four of five primaries in the Northeast, Bernie Sanders announced his campaign will soon start laying off "hundreds" of its staff members, the New York Times reports.

"We have had a very large staff, which was designed to deal with 50 states in this country," Sanders said in an interview with the Times. "Forty of the states are now behind us. So we have a great staff, great people."

The cuts to his staff, however, do not signal he is planning to bow out of the race anytime soon, the Vermont senator said. Instead, Sanders maintained he would remain in the race for the Democratic nomination at least until the end of the summer, and he hopes to rehire laid-off staff members eventually.

Five people familiar with the cuts also confirmed the news to Politico, hinting that Sanders was preparing to shift gears and potentially focus the rest of his campaign on influencing Clinton's platform.

In an announcement scheduled for later this afternoon, Sen. Ted Cruz will name former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina as his running mate if he secures the Republican nomination, multiple outlets are reporting.

This is a breaking news post. We will update with more as information becomes available.

State Sen. Jamie Raskin won Tuesday's Democratic primary in Maryland's eighth congressional district. But the bigger story is who lost—that would be David Trone, a wine retailer who spent $12.7 million of his own money in the hopes of winning the seat.

Trone, running in a district that includes the affluent Washington, DC, suburbs in Montgomery County, set a record for most money spent by a self-funding congressional candidate to win a House seat. (The previous record was $7.8 million, and that included both a primary and a general election; as of early April, Raskin's campaign had spent a little more than $1 million.)

The irony is that Trone was running as a campaign finance crusader. Much like Donald Trump, who cites his $35 million investment in his campaign as proof he can't be bought, Trone believed his enormous personal wealth would insulate him from charges of corruption. "I certainly could have raised enough money to fund a competitive campaign," he said in a full-page Washington Post ad two weeks ago, when he had only spent a pedestrian $9.1 million. "But the PACs, lobbyists and big dollar donors who give money would expect special attention. No matter how well-intentioned, those contributions and the candidates who take them are part of the reason Washington is broken."

That message carried him to the brink of success—or maybe it was just the deluge ads—but in the end, money alone didn't cut it. Trone won by large margins in the two counties that comprise a smaller portion of the district, but Raskin held a sizable edge in his home county, Montgomery. Trone's final receipt: a little more than $400 per vote.

Donald Trump dominated all five states in Tuesday's East Coast Republican primaries, a sweep that brought him at least 105 delegates and pushes him further along his path to securing the Republican presidential nomination and avoid a contested convention.

The Republican front-runner celebrated his impressive night from Trump Tower in New York, surrounded by his family and supporters including New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, where he declared the Republican primary race all but over. He also continued his recent calls for Gov. John Kasich and Sen. Ted Cruz to end their campaigns.

"I consider myself the presumptive nominee, absolutely," Trump told reporters. "Senator Cruz and Governor Kasich should really get out of the race."

The real estate magnate went on to ridicule his two rivals in light of their recent announcement that they were uniting to defeat Trump and force a brokered convention—a strategy that started to collapse a day after it was announced.

"Governor Kasich and Senator Cruz have really, really hurt themselves with a faulty deal," he said. "Politicians, all talk, no action."

When asked about reports he would soon be striking a more "presidential" tone, Trump hinted that although he might act differently, his "thought process" would remain the same.

"If you have a football team and you're winning, and you make it to the Super Bowl, you don't change your quarterback," Trump said.

Trump concluded his victory speech by suggesting the only factor driving Hillary Clinton's success is the "woman's card" and that if she were a man, she wouldn't be able to get even 5 percent of the vote. In her victory speech, Clinton referred to Trump's previous reference to her playing the "woman's card" and said that if that meant standing up for equal pay for equal work, and health care for women, "deal me in."

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback announced on Tuesday that Kansas is withdrawing from the federal government's refugee resettlement program over concerns that Syrian refugees could be security threats.

"Because the federal government has failed to provide adequate assurances regarding refugees it is settling in Kansas, we have no option but to end our cooperation with and participation in the federal refugee resettlement program," Brownback said in a press release.

Brownback had already issued an executive order in November stating that "no department, commission, board, or agency of the government of the State of Kansas shall aid, cooperate with, or assist in any way the relocation of refugees from Syria to the State of Kansas." Tuesday's announcement would apply to refugees from any country. But while the move sounds drastic, it's mostly a symbolic act that will have little on-the-ground impact for refugees or public safety.

For one, pulling out of the federal resettlement program doesn't mean refugees won't be allowed to live in Kansas. While Indiana and other states have tried to bar Syrians from entering their borders, they aren't actually able to do so. Like any other visa holders, refugees are able to go anywhere in the United States they'd like. It also doesn't mean that support for refugees who are currently living in Kansas or may move there will dry up. The funds that state agencies use for refugee aid are almost entirely federal money, and the Department of Health and Human Services retains control over the funds even if state employees or agencies don't take part. In those cases, Health and Human Services simply appoints another organization to administer the money. "This is the situation in some other states, usually because their resettlement program is very small," says Stacie Blake, the director of government and community relations at the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, one of the nonprofit groups that resettles refugees. "The money is not 'lost.'"

According to data from the State Department, only five Syrians have settled in Kansas since October last year.

Republicans in Congress are trying to end race and sex discrimination—in the womb. The Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act (PRENDA) would ban abortion on the basis of the race or sex of the fetus. Republicans say the measure is necessary to protect the civil rights of African Americans and women.

"It took the Civil War to make the state-sanctioned practice of human slavery come to an end," said Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.), the bill's author, during a recent hearing on the measure. "One glaring exception is life itself, the most foundational civil right of all."

According to Franks, who has introduced various versions PRENDA since 2008, ending race- and sex-selective abortions is the "civil rights struggle that will define our generation." During a hearing by an all-male committee earlier this month, Franks also noted that upward of 50 percent of African American babies are "killed before they're born," and that "a Hispanic child is three times more likely to be aborted than a white child."

The proposed measure would make it illegal for a physician to perform on abortion on a pregnant woman who wants the procedure because the fetus isn't her desired sex or race. Under the measure, the father of the unborn child and the pregnant woman's parents could sue a physician who performs such an abortion. Doctors would also be required to report suspected cases to law enforcement.

It's unclear where Franks is getting his numbers. A 2012 Guttmacher report found that evidence of sex- and race-based abortions in the United States is limited and inconclusive. According to the report, two studies using 2000 US census data found that although the sex ratio of first-born children was normal in families of Chinese, Indian, and Korean descent, those families did have a preference for sons in second and third births. The authors in that study were unable to conclude whether the imbalance was caused by abortion or fertility treatments.

But in a single 2011 study, commonly cited by PRENDA advocates, 65 Indian Americans who were interviewed had practiced sex selection, through either fertility treatments or abortion.

More recent data suggests that contrary to some stereotypes, Asian American communities are not biased in sex selecting for sons. A 2014 report by researchers at the University of Chicago Law School and two abortion rights groups analyzed population data from 2007 to 2011 and found that Chinese, Indian, and Korean Americans have more girls that white Americans.

Evidence to suggest that black and Hispanic communities are targeting their abortions is even less clear. According to Guttmacher, abortions are more common in black communities than white ones because unintended pregnancies are also more common. As a result, African American women get abortions at a rate five times higher than white women. "The truth is that behind virtually every abortion is an unintended pregnancy," wrote Susan A. Cohen in a 2008 article on abortion and women of color.

In a letter to the House, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, a coalition of 200 civil rights organizations, points out that health and economic disparities of black and Hispanic women are likely to blame for increased abortion. "African American women and Latina women have less access to contraception, prenatal care, and other critical reproductive health services, resulting in stark disparities across a number of sexual and reproductive health indicators," the Leadership Conference wrote.

Loretta Ross, the national coordinator of SisterSong, a reproductive justice organization for women of color, told Mother Jones in 2011, "It's kind of hard to find evidence that a black woman is going to have an abortion because she's surprised to find her baby is black. It just strains credulity to think that's a problem. I mean, she wakes up in the morning and says 'Oh my God! My baby's black!'?"

According to abortion rights advocates and Democratic legislators, the measure could increase discrimination against pregnant women, particularly women of color, by forcing doctors to speculate on the reasons their patients seek abortions, and then requiring the physicians to report suspected discriminatory abortions. Because of stereotypes that Asian communities prefer male children, advocates worry that Asian women would be especially vulnerable to profiling by their physicians. 

"This bill is so horrendous that I could not believe it when it was first brought up," said Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif.). "It is a nightmare. This is a piece of legislation that would impose criminal penalties on providers and limit the reproductive choices of women of color and all women."

Seven states already ban abortion based on sex selection. Only Arizona, which Franks represents, also bans race-selective abortions. 

Sen. Ted Cruz has dived into the controversy surrounding the growing number of anti-transgender bills popping up around the country, arguing that in the absence of such ordinances people are vulnerable to sexual "predators."

"There is no greater evil than predators," Cruz said at a campaign event on Saturday. "If the law says that any man, if he chooses, can enter a women's restroom, a little girl's restroom, and stay there, and he cannot be removed because he simply says at that moment he feels like a woman, you're opening the door for predators."

At the same event in Indiana, the Republican presidential candidate took aim at front-runner Donald Trump, who initially said North Carolina's version of the law was "problematic" and that transgender people should be able to use the bathroom of their choice. (The real estate magnate has since backtracked.)

"You know the most interesting thing about Donald Trump embracing the PC police is it shows who he really is," Cruz said. "It shows that Donald Trump is a creature of the elite New York liberals."

The issue over bathroom laws, which opponents say are enacted to force transgender people to use the bathroom assigned to their birth gender, has proved to be a contentious question for the three remaining Republican presidential candidates, with everyone from Fortune 500 company CEOs and celebrities publicly rebuking the measures as a form of discrimination.

Gov. John Kasich, who is reportedly aligning with Cruz to beat Trump out of winning the party's nomination outright, has said he would not have signed North Carolina's bill into law.