Political MoJo

Angelic Jolie on Adoption - Always Low Prices!

| Mon Jan. 8, 2007 11:49 AM EST

Kate Kretz, a heretofore little-known North Carolina artist has a rendition of Angelina Jolie that's causing quite a stir. The acrylic on canvas work entitled Blessed Art Thou, is on display in Miami this week and seems to be the biggest deal in celebrity art since Daniel Edwards' rendition of Pro-Life Britney.

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Jolie, who has now adopted two children, one from Cambodia, the other Ethiopia, has been a high profile champion of adoption from third world nations. Apparently she sees herself as celebrity watchdog when it comes to the issue, calling out none other than Madonna, for her legally murky adoption of a baby in Malawi: "Madonna knew the situation in Malawi, where he was born. It's a country where there is no real legal framework for adoption. Personally, I prefer to stay on the right side of the law. I would never take a child away from a place where adoption is illegal." Didn't Spears mess with Madonna too? Not advised.

No word from Anderson Cooper on whether Jolie will shell out the $50,000 (and then donate it) for Kretz' painting.

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Pelosi and the War

| Mon Jan. 8, 2007 11:12 AM EST

As Nancy Pelosi made clear yesterday on Face the Nation, the Democrats in Congress will employ their oversight perogatives as their main tactic against Bush from now until the presidential election in 2008. As the majority party, they can call oversight hearings, place Bush officials under oath, and haul administration programs before the TV cameras.

That's what is likely to happen this week. Just as Bush announces mid-week his new surge strategy of boosting troop strength in Iraq, the Dems will be questioning Condi Rice, the Secretary of State before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Thursday. A House Armed Services Committee hearing will hear Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Marine General Peter Pace on that same day.

Democratic Cleveland congressman Dennis Kucinich, the most outspoken member of the House against the war, tells the Washington Post this morning, "Congress has to intervene right now." And even Rahm Emmanuel, the man who is credited with masterminding the Democratic victory in the House elections last fall and who often tends to echo the Clinton line, is now speaking out strongly on the war: "This is not a surge. This is an escalation," he said. "When the American people voted for change in November,this is not what they had in mind."

Pelosi indicated yesterday that the main Democratic tool for slowing or blocking Bush on the war will be his probable request for supplemental funds to finance the surge. Whether they have the votes to deny him the funds is problematic.

-- James Ridgeway

The Two Faces of Bill Gates: Or How to Kill Those You Love the Most

| Mon Jan. 8, 2007 3:02 AM EST

Great piece in the LA Times about the Gates Foundation's two-faced record in the developing world--saving uncounted lives with vaccines and AIDS-fighting campaigns on one hand, endangering those same lives by investing in the companies that help kill or poison them on the other. Part of what's fascinating is that it took so long for someone to ask the question: Every nonprofit invests, but how many actually bother to agonize over how to make those dollars reflect the same values the foundation espouses? Not the Gates Foundation, apparently: It has a "firewall" between the grantmaking and the investment side that is soon to be reinforced by a move of the assets into a trust with only one goal--maximizing profits, er, foundation resources--and only two trustees, Bill and Melinda Gates. Not that it probably will make that much difference. Already, the Times finds, recipients of the Gates Foundation's investment largesse include

• Companies ranked among the worst U.S. and Canadian polluters, including ConocoPhillips, Dow Chemical Co. and Tyco International Ltd.

• Many of the world's other major polluters, including companies that own an oil refinery and one that owns a paper mill, which a study shows sicken children while the foundation tries to save their parents from AIDS.

• Pharmaceutical companies that price drugs beyond the reach of AIDS patients the foundation is trying to treat.

Using the most recent data available, a Times tally showed that hundreds of Gates Foundation investments — totaling at least $8.7 billion, or 41% of its assets, not including U.S. and foreign government securities — have been in companies that countered the foundation's charitable goals or socially concerned philosophy.

This is "the dirty secret" of many large philanthropies, said Paul Hawken, an expert on socially beneficial investing who directs the Natural Capital Institute, an investment research group. "Foundations donate to groups trying to heal the future," Hawken said in an interview, "but with their investments, they steal from the future."

Moreover, investing in destructive or unethical companies is not what is most harmful, said Hawken and other experts, including Douglas Bauer, senior vice president of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, a nonprofit group that assists foundations on policy and ethical issues. Worse, they said, is investing purely for profit, without attempting to improve a company's way of operating.

Such blind-eye investing, they noted, rewards bad behavior.

Oceans-21: Congress Premiers Plan to Strengthen NOAA

| Fri Jan. 5, 2007 3:02 PM EST

Predictably, Congressional dems are moving eco-friendly bills, beginning with Oceans-21, introduced by Rep. Sam Farr (D-Calif.). Oceans-21 (and no, it is not starring George Clooney) has been sitting around since 2004, and would significantly strengthen the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The bill would give the caretaker agency more power, resources, research capabilities, and most importantly, would create a national database of oceanic and coastal research that all regional centers could access.

Given the precarious state of our precious oceans, a stronger NOAA seems long overdue.

—Jen Phillips

Is Iran's Supreme Leader Dead?

| Fri Jan. 5, 2007 2:51 PM EST

That's what prominent neocon and American Enterprise Institute scholar Michael Ledeen reported in a one line blog post yesterday afternoon. Today, however, he seems less than certain that Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has indeed passed, telling Regime Change Iran, a blog whose agenda you can guess at, that

The source still insists Khamenei is dead, but I cannot find any direct or indirect confirmation. To my knowledge only one person says Khamenei is dead. That said, the regime would have every reason to keep the fact secret, and Khamenei's physical condition has certainly been grave. In addition to the reports of his emergency hospitalization, his message to the Islamic Community on the Eid festival was released, not publicly read, as he had always done in the past. He has made no public appearances for several days, and Persian web sites have declared—several days ago now—that he cannot carry out his responsibilities and will have to be replaced. The struggle for succession is well under way.

Ledeen, who's long agitated for regime change in Iran, is known for maintaining close ties to the Iranian exile community, so perhaps his information is legit. But that certainly depends on who his lone source really is -- and whether or not it's Ledeen's close friend Manucher Ghorbanifar, the Iranian arms dealer, Iran-Contra figure, and alleged intelligence fabricator. Stay tuned.

Chuck Norris Kicks Darwin's Ass

| Fri Jan. 5, 2007 2:43 PM EST

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I had Chuck Norris pegged as a survival-of-the-fittest kind of guy. Guess I was wrong. Over at MovieGuide.org, a site that reviews movies based on biblical principles, the star of Walker: Texas Ranger weighs in on some of the wacky "Chuck Norris Facts" floating around the Internet. Like this one:

Alleged Chuck Norris Fact: "There is no theory of evolution. Just a list of creatures Chuck Norris has allowed to live." It's funny. It's cute. But here's what I really think about the theory of evolution: It's not real. It is not the way we got here. In fact, the life you see on this planet is really just a list of creatures God has allowed to live. We are not creations of random chance. We are not accidents. There is a God, a Creator, who made you and me. We were made in His image, which separates us from all other creatures.

Now while we're discussing the falacy of natural selection, let's talk about Hollywood projects God has allowed to live. (Image: publicity shot from Top Dog.)

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How Many Lawyers Does It Take to Defend Bush's Balance of Power?

| Fri Jan. 5, 2007 2:15 PM EST

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President Bush believes Harriet Miers is qualified for the Supreme Court, but not to defend his administration from the onslaught of investigations the new Democratic Congress will likely mount. The Washington Post reports today that "Bush advisers inside and outside the White House concluded that she is not equipped for such a battle and that the president needs someone who can strongly defend his prerogatives."

The article goes on to say that "Four other lawyers have been hired as associate counsels in recent weeks to fill vacancies, and White House officials have discussed expanding the office." The administration has not announced Miers' replacement but is said to have one lined up.

This is one sporting match I'm really looking forward to.

Iraq Diary

| Fri Jan. 5, 2007 1:20 PM EST

Juan Cole this morning links to a very upsetting document he found at the British Library. It is the diary of Saad Eskander, director of the Iraq National Library and Archive.

An entry:

It is another bad week for the NLA.

On Sunday, I learnt that Ahmed Salih, who was on leave, was murdered by a Death Squad in his own house. Ahmed came from a poor family. After his father's death, he raised his younger brothers and sisters. He worked very hard to educate them. I also learnt that Ahmed was engaged to a girl two weeks before his death.

On Monday, I received more bad news. The older brother of Maiadah, who works in the Periodical Department, was murdered by a group of terrorists.

I learnt that some sniper fired at a car in the Republican Street, killing the driver and all the passengers.

It was a Christmas period and the security situation was as bad as ever. We have four Christians in our institution. The first two, 'A' and 'B', work in the Archive, the third, 'C', in the Library, and the fourth, 'D', in my office. I gave them 5 day-break to celebrate Christmas. 'D' took just one day off. She continued to show up, even when the main roads were blocked. I advised her to cover her hair, when passing through dangerous areas (i.e. under the control of the militias and armed gangs). She said that she was wearing Hijab for some time to hide her identity (i.e. being Christian).

Ten Step Pelosi Reform Program for New Dems

| Fri Jan. 5, 2007 11:32 AM EST

It's too soon to tell just how far the Dems are willing to go with their reforms. If they want to be taken seriously, however, they will need to take the following 10 steps.

1) Put Vice President Cheney under oath and get his secret energy meeting documents. They may show how the oil companies colluded in the war and what Bush got from them.

2) Find out who initiated the torturing of prisoners in the Iraq and Afghan wars and see to it that they are prosecuted and put in jail. That includes officials — civilian and military — in the White House, Justice Department, Pentagon, and on the battlefields.

3) Fire the military commanders and civilian officials who turned Saddam over to a death squad for execution.

4) Put Al Gore in charge of a new Congressional office to implement measures to reduce global warming.

5) Place former FBI chief Louis Freeh and current FBI head Robert Mueller under oath and order them to explain why they obstructed Congress in refusing to turn over to former Senator Bob Graham's intelligence investigation their key San Diego informant who was renting rooms to 9/11 hijackers.

6) Summon the outgoing Saudi ambassador, Prince Turki Al-Faisal, and get the straight scoop on the Saudi spy network in the U.S. and its ties with Al Qaeda.

7) Subpoena former FAA chief Jane Garvey and order her to explain how come her agency got numerous warnings about an impending attack on 9/11 and did nothing about it.

8) Investigate and move to indict top FDA officials who approve drugs for one use and then go to work and allow Big Pharma to sell them untested for other uses.

9) Place a moratorium on all oil and gas leases on the public domain until an impartial investigation revises the crooked Interior Department leasing program and recovers the billions owed by the oil industry to the government.

10) Deny federal funds to any state or locality engaged in "privatizing," i.e selling off this country's public highway system.

And, finally, stop fooling around: Instead of "reforming" the earmark system, end it.

Scientists Accuse ExxonMobil Of Paying Groups To Mislead the Public About Global Warming

| Thu Jan. 4, 2007 9:12 PM EST

The Union of Concerned Scientists has announced that ExxonMobil Corp. paid $16 million to forty-three oganizations over a seven-year period in order to mislead the public about global warming.

"ExxonMobil has manufactured uncertainty about the human causes of global warming just as tobacco companies denied their product caused lung cancer," said Alden Meyer, the Union of Concerned Scientists' Director of Strategy & Policy. "A modest but effective investment has allowed the oil giant to fuel doubt about global warming to delay government action just as Big Tobacco did for over 40 years.

Sallie Baliunas, an astro-physicist affiliated with at least nine of the forty-three advocacy groups, raised eyebrows in 2003 when she presented a paper arguing that there had been no significant climate change in the last millennia. Thirteen scientists came forward to say that Baliunas had misrepresented their work, but ExxonMobil continued to promote the paper as factual.

In its report, "Smoke, Mirrors & Hot AIr: How ExxonMobil Uses Big Tobacco's Tactics to 'Manufacture Uncertainty' on Climate Change," UCS accuses ExxonMobil Corp. of the following:

* raised doubts about even the most indisputable scientific evidence
* funded an array of front organizations to create the appearance of a broad platform for a tight-knit group of vocal climate change contrarians who misrepresent peer-reviewed scientific findings
* attempted to portray its opposition to action as a positive quest for "sound science" rather than business self-interest
* used its access to the Bush administration to block federal policies and shape government communications on global warming.