Political MoJo

Don't Call It Civil War - OK, How About Chaos?

| Wed Nov. 1, 2006 12:14 PM EST

Just about everything you need to know about the horrendous state of Iraq is captured in this PowerPoint slide, obtained by the New York Times. Here it is in a nutshell:

iraqchart.gif

What bunch of freedom-hating doom-and-gloomers put this assessment out? None other than the U.S. Central Command.

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I Had My Bible and I Had My Gun

| Wed Nov. 1, 2006 11:21 AM EST

Conrad Burns, running behind in Montana's Senate race, is the beneficiary of an advertising campaign by the National Rifle Association -- 7 billboards; 4,143 radio ads on 88 stations; 1,824 cable tv ads; and inserts in 11 newspapers.

Nationwide, the NRA is all over this election. In a video ad running on Newsmax, the NRA describes how victims of hurricane Katrina had their guns forcefully yanked out of their hands by bullying cops. One elderly woman who was trying to protect her dogs says she was slammed against the wall and put in a headlock by the invading police when they saw she was clutching a pistol in one hand. Then there's the little old African-American minister woman who was plenty put out when the cops came to her house. "Why come and get my gun?'' she says in the ad. "I am a good citizen. What are you worried about me for? I am a widow.I am 65 and I am here by myself.''

But she wasn't scared: "I had my Bible and I had my gun.''

Michigan Proposition is Ward Connerly's Latest Assault on Affirmative Action

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 6:41 PM EST

Michigan's Proposition 2 (a dead ringer for California's Proposition 209 which passed in 1996) is in a tight spot in the polls with only a week to go.

The proposition would ban any affirmative action programs that "give preferential treatment to individuals or groups based on their race, gender, color, ethnicity, or national origin." Also known as the "Michigan Civil Rights Initiative" the proposition's campaign is funded by Ward Connerly, the same man responsible for the California proposal and is headed by Jennifer Gratz
plaintiff in the 2003 University of Michigan Supreme Court case, which upheld the school's use of race as a factor in admissions while also outlawing their formal points system in making such decisions.

Conservative students on the Michigan campus have been actively supporting the measure while the National Bar Association, the UAW, the ACLU and both the Republican and Democratic gubernatorial candidates oppose it.

Connerly, who is African American, has spent $500,000 on the Michigan campaign, and has been on a zealous crusade to end affirmative action programs for more than a decade. As he told the New York Times, "When my toes turn up, that's when I'll stop fighting this."

Poll numbers suggest many in Michigan haven't made up their minds yet. An October 18 Detroit Free Press poll showed 41% in favor, 44% opposed and 15% undecided.

Should the measure pass California could be a window into the future, where numbers of Latino and African students in the state's University of California system have dropped significantly since 1997 (the year after Prop 209 passed). At UC Berkeley this year only 3% of the entering freshman class was African American and at UCLA the number was 2%, the lowest in 30 years.

—Amaya Rivera

No Sex Please, We're Consenting Adults

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 5:55 PM EST

It's not news that the Bush administration doesn't want teenagers to think about sex, much less do the deed. (It's spent $1 billion on abstinence-only programs already—see "Virginity for Sale" in the current issue of Mother Jones.) But now it's encouraging grown adults not to go there, either. From today's USA Today:

Now the government is targeting unmarried adults up to age 29 as part of its abstinence-only programs, which include millions of dollars in federal money that will be available to the states under revised federal grant guidelines for 2007. [snip]

But Wade Horn, assistant secretary for children and families at the Department of Health and Human Services, said the revision is aimed at 19- to 29-year-olds because more unmarried women in that age group are having children. [snip]

"The message is 'It's better to wait until you're married to bear or father children,' " Horn said. "The only 100% effective way of getting there is abstinence."

Certainly, a 23-year-old can't be trusted to figure out contraception. And, let's not forget that avoiding sex before marriage will save you not just from premature parenthood but a host of other ills (to quote one federally-funded abstinence curriculum):

"Infertility, isolation, jealousy, poverty, heartbreak, substance abuse, AIDS, pregnancy, cervical cancer, genital herpes, unstable long-term commitments, depression, embarrassment, meaningless wedding, sexual violence, personal disappointment, suicide, feelings of being used, loss of honesty, loneliness, loss of personal goals, distrust of others, pelvic inflammatory disease, loss of reputation, fear of pregnancy, disappointed parents, loss of self-esteem..."

Can't wait to see the educational materials that will be coming out of the Don't Sleep With Anyone Before 30 campaign.

Happy Halloween: Scary Election Stories

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 5:24 PM EST

One week until the election and things are getting scary. Yesterday, the New York Times had a full-page ad featuring a creepy vampire peering over the shoulder of an unsuspecting woman at the voting booth. Maybe the creepiest part was that the poor woman looked like an innocent, naïve and vulnerable librarian-type.

The ad was warning voters to watch out for election fraud, report anything suspicious and not accept provisional ballots. But are voters really too naïve? How easy is it to actually rig an election? Well, one website lays it all out in a detailed list titled "How to: Do Election Fraud, Steal Elections or Fix a Vote." The document was posted on a site about database administration created by computer tech expert named Steven Hauser. It is a work in progress that makes some disturbing statements:

"A simple PC and a database program or spread sheet is enough technology to sort targets by vulnerability or effectiveness for attack. Public available data files such as public voting records from the Secretary of State, (about $45 for the data set from the State of Minnesota) and the US Census are enough data to fine tune a set of targets figure out vulnerabilities and organize subsets of targets by method of attack."

What method of attack, you ask? Well, they range from "Inserting Security Problems with Voting Rule Manipulation" (essentially consisting of challenging voters' identities and records), to the more traditional method of gerrymandering.

If you want something that will give you a good scare tonight, pause that Scream 3 DVD and check out this scary how to list.

--Caroline Dobuzinskis

Menendez in GOP Crosshairs

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 4:45 PM EST

New polls show Bob Menendez hanging on to a thin lead in the New Jersery senate race, but Tom Kean,Jr. is attacking non-stop, now with more backing from the National Republican Senatorial campaign in D.C. A new ad, sponsored by the committee, once again hammers Menendez on corruption. A CNN poll is giving the Democrat a 12 point lead among registered voters and 7 points among likely voters. Nevertheless, the GOP clearly sees the possibility of a win here. They have been diverting money from other key races, such as in the Ohio senate battle, where they have concluded a loss is inevitable. The new money is meant to enhance Kean's image in south Jersey.

Menendez insists he's not under investigation and that Kean is a Bush puppet. "I don't think the national Republican Party would spend $3½ million if it didn't believe at the end of the day that Tom Kean Jr. will be a vote for the president and his policies," Menendez is quoted as saying in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Meanwhile Kean is off on a new attack, ripping Menendez for giveaways to illegal aliens. In a hysterical ad, young Tom shrieks: "Stop Bob Menendez from giving billions in social security benefits to illegal aliens."

--James Ridgeway

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Global Warming Compared to Y2K, the "Killer African Bee Scare"

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 2:39 PM EST

WVII and WFVX, two local TV stations in Bangor, Maine, will no longer cover stories on global warming. The general manager of the station, Michael Palmer, declared that only when "Bar Harbor is underwater…" will they do stories on the subject. Sounds like a good philosophy, right? In an email to his staff, Palmer wrote that the stations will no longer cover global warming because:

"a) we do local news, b) the issue evolved from hard science into hard politics and c) despite what you may have heard from the mainstream media, this science is far from conclusive."

But won't it be local news when Bar Harbor is underwater? Maybe Palmer should read the latest issue of Mother Jones, where Julia Whitty talks about 12 tipping points in the global ecosystem triggered by global warming, all of which have local impacts. Plus, he can add to his reading list the Mother Jones article last year which broke the story on ExxonMobil's funding of climate change deniers, the ones who agree with him that the "science is far from conclusive." Palmer went on to write that "global warming stories [are] in the same category as 'the killer African bee scare' from the 1970s or, more recently, the Y2K scare when everyone's computer was going to self-destruct." A little extra reading defininitely can't hurt.

Scrabble Amateurs Post Record Score, Americans Obsess About Just About Everything

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 1:52 PM EST

Stefan Fatsis, author of Word Freak, reports in Slate about the latest in chapter in the country's Scrabble obsession. Earlier this month, in the basement of a Unitarian church in Lexington, Mass., a carpenter scored 830 points in a single game. His opponent, scored 490. The two men set three records for sanctioned Scrabble in North America: the most points in a game by one player (830), the most total points in a game (1,320), and the most points on a single turn: 365, for QUIXOTRY.

Read Fatsis' play-by-play of how the two amateurs, in a growing world of money-making pros, produced the Scrabble Shot Heard Round the World.

And speaking of amateurs using big words, check out the latest issue Mother Jones, on newstands now, which includes an inside look at the obsessive world of high school debate, "Revenge of the Nerds", where folks like Brad Pitt and Karl Rove got their start.

Poll: Arab Americans Increasingly Voting Democratic

| Tue Oct. 31, 2006 1:26 PM EST

The Arab-American voting bloc is having an increasing impact on the outcome of U.S. elections and is now shifting Democratic, according to a poll released last week by the Arab American Institute (AAI).

"There's clearly a trend in the Democratic direction and that shows up not only in head to head races, but also in the issues," said Dr. James Zogby, president and CEO of AAI, and brother of pollster John Zogby.

The poll, conducted by Zogby International in October, surveyed 701 Arab-American voters in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Florida — states that have close races in which the Arab-American vote is expected to play a "decisive role."

Just ten years ago, Arab-Americans were virtually split between both parties, according to a Zogby poll taken at the time. In the most recent poll, the split had shifted, with 45 percent of Arab-American respondents identifying themselves as Democrats, and 31 percent as Republicans.

Part of this could stem from the war in Iraq. Seventy-seven percent of those polled in October rated the war as crucial in determining their vote for members of Congress.

"Our numbers track the country, but writ large. We're kind of like canaries in the coal mine on some of these Middle East issues," Zogby told Mother Jones.

Initially more split on their opinion of U.S. involvement in the war in Iraq, the disapproval rate among Arab Americans has risen to over 90 per cent, Zogby said.

"If a Republican standard-bearer were to break dramatically with the Republicans' interests on Middle East issues, there would be a change," said Zogby. "But I don't see that happening."

--Caroline Dobuzinskis

Electronic Voting Gets Its Own Satire Site

| Mon Oct. 30, 2006 8:11 PM EST

When the Yes Men meet Diebold, the result is Fixavote.com. Purportedly the web home of an outfit called Elections Consultants, the site teases with promises such as "we overcome the challenges of competition and ensure election results for our clients." The site's pitch-perfect stock photography and annoying tinkling music are the hallmarks of a satire but sadly, not everybody has got the joke. Darius Parker, who claims to be the president of Elections Consultants, said that he had been contacted by representatives of about 30 political campaigns to date. "They're asking me the details of a specific geographic location and what I can do to enhance the election for them," he told PC World.

Those 30 eager campaign workers called the wrong number: everybody knows that if you want to rig an election, you call Hugo Chavez or Kenneth Blackwell.