Donald Trump refused to rule out using nuclear weapons in Europe during a town hall in Wisconsin on Wednesday. The Republican presidential front-runner was asked about his recent contradictory statements about nuclear proliferation—in which he said he was concerned about the spread of nukes while also suggesting that more countries, including Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia, should be allowed to acquire them.

MSNBC's Chris Matthews, the host of the town hall, tried to pin Trump down on what circumstances might compel President Trump to deploy the United States' nuclear arsenal.

"Look, nuclear should be off the table, but would there a time when it could be used? Possibly," Trump said.

Matthews asked Trump to tell the Middle East and Europe that he would never use nuclear weapons, but Trump continued to evade. Asked again if he'd use nuclear weapons in Europe, Trump held firm. "I am not—I am not taking cards off the table," Trump responded.

Watch:

Watch Samantha Bee's Depressing Twist on March Madness

Samantha Bee has come up with a new kind of March Madness this week, for those of you who can't stand to watch any more basketball because your brackets have been wrecked. But be warned: The late-night host's version is also difficult to stomach.

On her show, Full Frontal, on Monday night, Bee awarded an MVP of private probation corporations—companies that earn huge profits by contracting with court systems to monitor probationers. These probationers, Bee explains, are often low-income people charged with minor offenses like traffic violations, and when they can't afford to pay the fines imposed by the for-profit probation companies, they're jailed.

"Which firm managed to distinguish itself from the shit pile of other predatory companies," she asked, to earn the MVPPC, or the Most Valuable Private Probation Corporation? It was Georgia-based Sentinel Offender Services, which, according to Bee, set up its own "March Madness" bonus program, in which its employees earn cash prizes if they meet or exceed their office's monthly revenue forecast. "As if levying fines and surcharges on people too poor to pay tickets isn't its own reward," Bee said. And how do they bring in more money? Sometimes they lobby judges to release probationers they helped put in jail, Bee learned, or they allegedly force probationers to pay fees for drug tests that were never ordered by courts.

"Any March Madness fan knows that offense is key, and when it comes to how they treat the people of Georgia, nobody is more offensive than Sentinel," Bee said. "Their ethics are offensive, their policies are offensive, their whole company is offensive. Unfortunately, they lack defense: Seriously, there's no defense for incentivizing probation collection, and that could really hurt them on the court—I'm sorry, in the court—because, oh yeah, Sentinel is currently in court being sued for illegally forcing middle-aged ladies to squeeze out urine and $15 dollars for the privilege."

Watch the full clip above, and check out Mother Jones' investigation into "the wild, shadowy, and highly lucrative bail industry" while you're at it.

After previously pledging to support whoever becomes the Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump said Tuesday that promise no longer stands. Instead, Trump said during CNN's town hall in Wisconsin, "we'll see who it is."

Trump repeatedly noted in Tuesday that he does not need the support of Ted Cruz or of any of the GOP contenders who have dropped out, including Jeb Bush and Scott Walker, saying he doesn't want to make anyone "uncomfortable."

"I don't want his support, I don't need his support, I want him to be comfortable," Trump said of Cruz.

Cruz, who appeared first during the town hall, was also asked whether he would support Trump if he is the nominee. Cruz refused to explicitly answer the question.

The first question Donald Trump was asked during CNN's town hall in Wisconsin on Tuesday was whether he would fire his campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, who was charged with misdemeanor battery on Tuesday for allegedly manhandling a reporter at an event earlier this month. Trump, noting that he is "a loyal person" who defends people who are "unjustly accused," said Lewandowski would continue to serve on his campaign team.

Watch the whole exchangebelow.

Ted Cruz stood by his proposal to patrol "Muslim neighborhoods" during CNN's town hall in Wisconsin on Tuesday night, repeating his assertion that this strategy worked in New York City.

Host Anderson Cooper pressed Cruz repeatedly on his stance, noting that New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton had criticized Cruz's proposal. "It is clear from his comments that Sen. Cruz knows absolutely nothing about counterterrorism in New York City," Bratton wrote in an op-ed in the New York Daily News. But Cruz stood firm, describing Bratton as a member of the administration of "left-wing radical" New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Watch the exchange, starting around the eight-minute mark.

This Law Just Took Abortion Pseudoscience to a New Low

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert on Monday signed a bill that makes the state the first in the nation to require doctors to anesthetize fetuses before performing abortions after 20 weeks of gestation. Previously, fetal anesthesia for abortion after 20 weeks was optional in Utah.

Supporters of the new law, called the Protecting Unborn Children Amendments, say fetuses can feel pain starting at about 20 weeks, so anesthesia or analgesic should be administered to "eliminate or alleviate organic pain to the unborn child." But scientists have rejected the fetal pain claim, saying there is no conclusive evidence to back up such legislation.

Still, 12 states ban abortion after 20 weeks post-fertilization on the grounds that the fetus can feel pain. The 20-week mark is several weeks before the point at which the fetus is considered viable and abortion is no longer legally protected by Roe v. Wade. Utah already bans abortion after viability.

Republican State Sen. Curt Bramble initially planned to introduce a 20-week ban, but attorneys in the state advised him the law would not pass constitutional muster, according to the Salt Lake Tribune.

"The process of a child being born is a natural process. There's nothing natural [about abortion]. In fact, it's barbaric," Bramble said, adding, "In this quote 'medical procedure,' let's call it what it is: It's killing babies. And if we're going to kill that baby, we ought to protect it from pain."

Dr. Sean Esplin, a Utah-based physician, told the Associated Press that in order to comply with the law, the anesthesia will have to go through the woman to reach the fetus. Doctors can give the woman general anesthesia, which would make her unconscious, or a heavy dose of narcotics, neither of which were previously necessary for the procedure.

According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, side effects of anesthesia include nausea, confusion, chills, and rarely more serious symptoms like delirium or long-term memory loss. "You never give those medicines if you don't have to," David Turok of the University of Utah's obstetrics and gynecology department told NBC.

Utah is the only state in the country with an anesthesia requirement during abortion. The Montana Legislature passed a similar law in 2015, but it was vetoed by the governor.

Donald Trump is defending his campaign manager to the very end, despite mounting evidence against him.

On Tuesday morning, Trump's campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, was charged with misdemeanor battery for forcibly grabbing reporter Michelle Fields at an event in Jupiter, Florida, on March 8. A video released Tuesday clearly shows Lewandowski grabbing Fields. But on Tuesday afternoon, Trump took to Twitter to defend the man running his campaign for president—and claim the new footage proves nothing.

This is not the first time the Trump team has denied the incident—indeed, there is a long list of denials and smears targeted at Fields. Lewandowski intends to plead not guilty.

Update 3:15 p.m. ET: Trump suggested later on Tuesday that Fields should be the one facing charges for grabbing him and "shout[ing] questions."

Pro-union activists rally in front of the Supreme Court on January 11.

The Supreme Court deadlocked on Tuesday for the second time since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last month—and this time, public sector unions were the winner.

The 4-4 split underscores the immediate impact of Scalia's death and the new reality of a divided eight-member court. Senate Republicans have so far refused to consider President Barack Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland to replace Scalia.

Before Scalia's death, the conservative majority on the Supreme Court was poised to strike a "mortal blow" to public sector unions, long a target of the conservative movement. A conservative legal group brought Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association to stop unions from collecting compulsory fees from nonunion employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. The case aimed to weaken unions' political sway by driving down union membership and decimating union coffers.

The conservative group behind the case brought it knowing that it likely had a 5-4 majority on its side. After oral arguments in January, the Supreme Court appeared ready to rule against unions. But Scalia's death changed that. As Mother Jones' Stephanie Mencimer predicted after the justice's passing, "Perhaps the biggest beneficiaries of Scalia's death are public sector unions."

The split leaves in place a lower court ruling in favor of the labor unions and demonstrates how the union opponents' strategy has backfired. When they still had a likely 5-4 majority on their side, the union opponents had rushed the case to the Supreme Court by asking the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to rule against them quickly in 2013. The 9th Circuit complied—but the Supreme Court's ruling came a month and a half too late.

Republicans have long rallied supporters by emphasizing the importance of selecting Supreme Court justices and warning what might happen if a Democratic president picks the next one. In a speech Monday afternoon at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Hillary Clinton will make the same case to Democrats.

Clinton will discuss the blockbuster cases before the court this term, according to a Clinton campaign aide familiar with the speech, to hammer home the importance of electing a Democratic president in order to protect the party's top priorities. Those cases include one about abortion access and another on President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration.

"Given the range of cases currently before the Court—on everything from immigration to a women's right to choose, affirmative action to voting rights—Clinton will say that the core pillars of the progressive movement are at risk of being upended by the Court in a single term," the aide said in an email. She will remind voters that the next president will likely make additional nominations to the court, beyond filling the seat of the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Clinton will also discuss the current confirmation battle surrounding Merrick Garland, Obama's nominee to replace Scalia. Clinton plans to argue that "it is critically important that Senate Republicans not be allowed to succeed in their strategy of refusing to consider the President’s nominee," according to the aide.

The speech, which will also address Donald Trump and the dangers his hypothetical Supreme Court nominees could pose to progressive causes, will likely be seen as a pivot to the general election. Clinton's Democratic primary opponent, Bernie Sanders, swept three races over the weekend and is hoping to score an upset against Clinton in Wisconsin on April 5. But Clinton still holds a substantial lead over Sanders in the pledged delegate count, 1,243 to 975, with 2,383 delegates needed to clinch the Democratic nomination.

Update, April 1: California's State Assembly approved the measure. Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to sign the bill into law on Monday.

California lawmakers and labor unions have reached a historic deal to raise the state's minimum wage to $15, the LA Times reports.

The plan will boost the minimum wage from $10 to $10.50 by January 2017, gradually increasing it to $15 over the following six years. Smaller businesses, those with less than 25 employees, will have one extra year to comply with the new changes.

If the deal passes in the state legislature, California will become the first state in the country to adopt a $15 minimum wage—a goal that activists and lawmakers around the country have pushed in recent years as one way to combat income inequality. According to the Times, state legislators could vote on the issue by the end of next week.

The movement to boost the $7.25 federal minimum wage has been an important campaign issue for Sen. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton. While both Democratic rivals support raising the minimum wage, only Sanders has endorsed hiking it to $15. Clinton supports raising it to $12.

California Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to announce the deal as early as today. For a deeper look at the issues surrounding the minimum wage debate, check out our analysis here.